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I meant to reply a few days ago.

No need to worry about any band-width issues.

Don't need a car in Montreal.

Re: accounting jobs. I don't know anything about accounting, so I'm not much help. I imagine there are a lot jobs available.

I am from Ottawa, where bilingualism is an issue, but that may be because a lot of jobs are government, and it's the Capitol.

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I meant to reply a few days ago.

No need to worry about any band-width issues.

Don't need a car in Montreal.

Re: accounting jobs. I don't know anything about accounting, so I'm not much help. I imagine there are a lot jobs available.

I am from Ottawa, where bilingualism is an issue, but that may be because a lot of jobs are government, and it's the Capitol.

What is bilingualism in Ottawa like? Is it mostly anglophone with some francophones? (like Texas/California in terms of Spanish) or is it a 50/50 or something different?

Also, about public transport. I lived in Germany for a while and there were - in Düsseldorf at least - month passes you could buy and ride any form of public transit within the city. Does something like that exist in Montréal as well or do you have to pay per ride. I apologize in advance if that is a stupid question, but outside of Düsseldorf I've never lived in a city with good public transit.

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What is bilingualism in Ottawa like? Is it mostly anglophone with some francophones? (like Texas/California in terms of Spanish) or is it a 50/50 or something different?

Also, about public transport. I lived in Germany for a while and there were - in Düsseldorf at least - month passes you could buy and ride any form of public transit within the city. Does something like that exist in Montréal as well or do you have to pay per ride. I apologize in advance if that is a stupid question, but outside of Düsseldorf I've never lived in a city with good public transit.

I just found this looking up another city! Ottawa is a very politically correct bilingual. If you want to work in the public service, you must be bilingual. I work for the service. I'm bilingual, not fluent. I can talk to anyone, but my writing is adequate, at best.

All of the signs, in this part of Ontario, are bilingual. Drive across the river to Quebec, all the signs are French, no English, thanks to language laws. Language very sensitive issue, here. Ottawa probably 50/50. West Ottawa, more English. East Ottawa, more French.

Montreal is mixed English-French, but, of course, French trumps English. If you go towards east Quebec and Quebec City, it's mostly francophone. That area is primarily separatist, too. Lots of people who don't speak any English. If you go to Quebec City (Highly recommend) you'll find them quite snotty and kind of Parisian about their French. The city is gorgeous, very European, so worth putting up with them!

Public transit is very good in Montreal. I haven't been to that part of Germany, but I can say that most European cities I've been to the transit system is superior to anywhere in North America.

You can get a pass in Montreal, or pay per ride.

Montreal is also right on the border, as you know, so if you have or rent a car you can get to Vermont, New Hampshire, Mass, and NY in no time at all.

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Public transport is excellent in Montreal. A monthly pass for subway and buses will set you back around 50$. Never been to Düsseldorf, but I'd rate the public transport system on par with Berlin or Stuttgart. You won't need a car and taxis are fairly cheap, though parking won't be much of an issue.

Language will not be too much of a problem though your partner really should make an effort to learn French. English is not the language of choice for most Monrealers even though everyone speaks excellent English (you'll find the odd person who flatly refuses to speak English though). It's accepted but not encouraged; and if your partner wants to immerse in Quebec culture then French is an absolute must.

sD.

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Thank you for all of the feedback, I appreciate it.

I grew up in Montreal and did my undergrad at McGill. It's an amazing city. Cheap as dirt to live and play and also really beautiful. The campus is right in the middle of the city, bars, major shoping. Sometimes I wish I'd never left.

Here is some info for you.

Public transport is very easy as is hailing a cab but if you live near the university you most likely wont need it. You can walk everywhere. A lot of students live in the McGill Ghetto area or the plateau. The more east you go the more french the city becomes.

Cell phone plans with data are expensive. Rogers and Telus are good. Bell is ok. That's the one draw back. Videotron is the biggest TV, Internet provider in Quebec. Be careful though because they charge you per kilobite after a certain amount of downloading/uploading.

Good luck!

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A lot of students live in the McGill Ghetto area or the plateau. The more east you go the more french the city becomes.

Personally I would steer clear of the Ghetto. There're some nice places, but prices have gone up in the last years, and some landlords charge ridiculous sums for shitty places. Plateau is awesome. Anyway.. I wouldn't worry about apartments at all. On your PhD salary alone you can afford a lovely apartment.

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Personally I would steer clear of the Ghetto. There're some nice places, but prices have gone up in the last years, and some landlords charge ridiculous sums for shitty places. Plateau is awesome. Anyway.. I wouldn't worry about apartments at all. On your PhD salary alone you can afford a lovely apartment.

What is entailed in 'lovely' apartment? 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom? Loft?

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What is entailed in 'lovely' apartment? 1 bedroom, 2 bedroom? Loft?

Two bedrooms, good state repair, no rat infestation.

sD.

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I'm a US citizen recently admitted to McGill (and seriously considering attending). I have a lot of possibly-stupid questions about Montreal/Canada in general and the logistics of moving from the US to Canada.

How difficult is it to get and maintain a student visa?

What is a living wage in Montreal? For that matter, what is income tax like in Canada? Any one know if I will owe Canadian income tax or US income tax or both?

How much does a decent apartment go for typically?

What's the health care situation for non-Canadians (I imagine if I maintained my US insurance it would offer only minimal coverage outside of the US, but I imagine that as a non-canadian citizen, I am not eligible for most of the benefits of the Canadian public health system, so where does that leave me?)

I know (from the posts above) that Montreal has good public transportation, but is it useful at all to have a car? What is the parking situation? Would I be better off getting rid of my car before moving there?

In what parts of town do (graduate) students typically live?

Anything else you think I should know?

(I'm sure I'll think of more questions, but that's a pretty good list for now)

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I'm a US citizen recently admitted to McGill (and seriously considering attending). I have a lot of possibly-stupid questions about Montreal/Canada in general and the logistics of moving from the US to Canada.

How difficult is it to get and maintain a student visa? For Quebec you need an acceptance from the province of Quebec. Get that beforehand. I believe US citizens can get a visa at the border, but I'm not sure if it works that way for Quebec because you need that extra form. I'm from Europe, so it was a bit different for me.

What is a living wage in Montreal? For that matter, what is income tax like in Canada? Any one know if I will owe Canadian income tax or US income tax or both? Don't know about this

How much does a decent apartment go for typically? Cheap. Montreal is the cheapest city I've ever lived in. My room was 400 CAD incl and I shared with 2 people. I lived in the center. There is plenty of housing, very easy to find. You can always sublet something and find another place from there. Check craigslist for an indication for apts. I only have experience with shared housing.

What's the health care situation for non-Canadians (I imagine if I maintained my US insurance it would offer only minimal coverage outside of the US, but I imagine that as a non-canadian citizen, I am not eligible for most of the benefits of the Canadian public health system, so where does that leave me?) I'm not from the States, but it seems ridiculous to keep US insurance (that must be ridiculously expensive). As far as I know, US students can get insurance through McGill for a reasonable price (probably written on the website how much it is). Health care in Canada is much better in the States and health care is for free for Canadians. I didn't need insurance, because still had the (cheap) insurance from my country.

I know (from the posts above) that Montreal has good public transportation, but is it useful at all to have a car? No, maybe if you live on the south shore (but you don't want that, you want to live on the island), but otherwise not What is the parking situation? Not enough parking spots in the center. You have to pay on certain streets Would I be better off getting rid of my car before moving there? Yes, useless to have one if you'll stay in town mostly. I just rented a car if I wanted to go somewhere, that is very cheap for 1 day (at least in comparison with Western Europe). The center is very walkable and Montreal has bicycle roads!

In what parts of town do (graduate) students typically live? You have the McGill ghetto, but I wouldn't live there (mostly undergrads I think). Try to live in the Plateau. I love that area. Montreal is small, so you can walk or cycle. I love the neighborhood around St. Denis and Duluth.

Anything else you think I should know? It's very nice! You'll love it!

(I'm sure I'll think of more questions, but that's a pretty good list for now)

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I'm a US citizen recently admitted to McGill (and seriously considering attending). I have a lot of possibly-stupid questions about Montreal/Canada in general and the logistics of moving from the US to Canada.

How difficult is it to get and maintain a student visa? For Quebec you need an acceptance from the province of Quebec. Get that beforehand. I believe US citizens can get a visa at the border, but I'm not sure if it works that way for Quebec because you need that extra form. I'm from Europe, so it was a bit different for me.

What is a living wage in Montreal? For that matter, what is income tax like in Canada? Any one know if I will owe Canadian income tax or US income tax or both? Don't know about this

How much does a decent apartment go for typically? Cheap. Montreal is the cheapest city I've ever lived in, but I don't know where you compare it with? My room was 400 CAD incl and I shared with 2 people. I lived in the center. There is plenty of housing, very easy to find. You can always sublet something and find another place from there. Check craigslist for an indication for apts. I only have experience with shared housing.

What's the health care situation for non-Canadians (I imagine if I maintained my US insurance it would offer only minimal coverage outside of the US, but I imagine that as a non-canadian citizen, I am not eligible for most of the benefits of the Canadian public health system, so where does that leave me?) I'm not from the States, but it seems ridiculous to keep US insurance (that must be ridiculously expensive). As far as I know, US students can get insurance through McGill for a reasonable price (probably written on the website how much it is). Health care in Canada is much better in the States and health care is for free for Canadians. I didn't need insurance, because still had the (cheap) insurance from my country.

I know (from the posts above) that Montreal has good public transportation, but is it useful at all to have a car? No, maybe if you live on the south shore (but you don't want that, you want to live on the island), but otherwise not What is the parking situation? Not enough parking spots in the center. You have to pay on certain streets Would I be better off getting rid of my car before moving there? Yes, useless to have one if you'll stay in town mostly. I just rented a car if I wanted to go somewhere, that is very cheap for 1 day (at least in comparison with Western Europe). The center is very walkable and Montreal has bicycle roads!

In what parts of town do (graduate) students typically live? You have the McGill ghetto, but I wouldn't live there (mostly undergrads I think). Try to live in the Plateau. I love that area. Montreal is small, so you can walk or cycle. I love the neighborhood around St. Denis and Duluth.

Anything else you think I should know? It's very nice! You'll love it!

(I'm sure I'll think of more questions, but that's a pretty good list for now)

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I'm heading to Greenville, NC in the fall. Has anyone been there? I'm going to visit in a few weeks, so I'd love some restaurant suggestions, apartment ideas, etc.

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I'm finishing up my BA there right now.

Apartment ideas: Don't live at University Manor. The newest complex, the Bellamy, is nice, but is going to be filled with undergrads. It's on the bus route, though. There are a lot of houses/townhouses around campus. You don't want to rent anything beyond 3rd street or you may end up in the hood.

Restaurants: Greenville, NC is affectionately known as 'the arm-pit of North Carolina'. You won't find a wide variety of good restaurants. Parker's BBQ is a staple. Ham's is a good place to go. They brew their own beer and have trivia on Wednesday nights. Boli's downtown is good for a late-night slice of pizza on the weekend, and Cook Out is the best 'fast food' burger ever (I have to say that as a native North Carolinian).

The good news: You're an hour and a half away from Raleigh, NC, which has a lot of cool stuff. It's a quick drive straight up highway 264.

PM me if you want any other info.

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Hey fellow grad students,

Im headed to McGill starting this fall and I am in the middle of looking for some potential off-campus housing around the campus. I know about the ghetto but it seems that for a small studio apartment 1.5, I can probably get more value for my money if I live a bit farther away from the ghetto. I am considering the Plateau area (near Metro Sherbrooke) but at the same time I would like to be near around other students (social life) as well as groceries, nightlife, etc. If I consider moving a bit farther away from campus. how much is the monthly fare for the metro. Also, are there any recommended areas around Montreal that fellow McGill students can refer me too. Not too far from campus (walking distance or 1 stop metro). Thanks!

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Just wondering if anyone else is headed to Montreal in the Fall? Ill be new to the city and would appreciate any feedback you could provide re: where grad students usually settle, what are reasonable rent prices (for shared apts and for living alone), and what streets are well connected by metro to UdeM. Thanks!

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Just wondering if anyone else is headed to Montreal in the Fall? Ill be new to the city and would appreciate any feedback you could provide re: where grad students usually settle, what are reasonable rent prices (for shared apts and for living alone), and what streets are well connected by metro to UdeM. Thanks!

Hi BabyHelga,

All the blue line is well connected to l'UdeM, the stations that surround the campus are on Edouard Montpetit, Jean Brillant and Cote-des-Neiges, from where you can also take several buses. You might wanna check if your program is going to move to the new facilities though... there are some programs that are now offered in Laval, which is already outside Montreal. I remember having to go there for a semester and it was really annoying traveling for one hour by subway! Unfortunately, everything else took place around the large campus so it didn't make sense to move to Laval.

If you already know that you'll have most of your seminars downtown (not really downtown but that's how they refer to this campus), there are a lot of cheap places to live around. Notre-Dame-de-Grace and Cote-des-Neiges are the closest neighborhoods, and they are both nice and safe to walk by night (going North on the blue line is not very safe). NDG is a bit more expensive but if you prefer to be amongst anglophones, that would be the right choice. CDN is very francophone but also very immigrant oriented.

As for where are grad students settling, I don't know but CDN is a very quiet neighborhood and you can easily find concrete buildings with a terrific soundproof structure.

Cheap rent if you want to share a room in a 3 -or more- bedroom apartment would be max. 400$ all inclusive. If you want to share a small 2 bedroom apartment, it's higher, probably 500$ all inclusive.

Good luck!

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Just wondering if anyone else is headed to Montreal in the Fall? Ill be new to the city and would appreciate any feedback you could provide re: where grad students usually settle, what are reasonable rent prices (for shared apts and for living alone), and what streets are well connected by metro to UdeM. Thanks!

Hi! I'm also moving to Montreal for the Fall semester. I'll be moving there in June to start some French courses before my PhD at McGill begins in the Fall. If you are interested in meeting new grad students in the city just let me know! :-)

Kathryn

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Hi Kathryn. Congrats on McGill. I will be attending there, also for epidemiology. See you in the fall.

Hi! I'm also moving to Montreal for the Fall semester. I'll be moving there in June to start some French courses before my PhD at McGill begins in the Fall. If you are interested in meeting new grad students in the city just let me know! :-)

Kathryn

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I think the topic title should be changed because there are other universities in Montreal. ;o)

I'll be going to Concordia for my PhD and I'm moving for September 1 as I have to finish my MA thesis before I get to there..... (nervous laughter)

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I think the topic title should be changed because there are other universities in Montreal. ;o)

I'll be going to Concordia for my PhD and I'm moving for September 1 as I have to finish my MA thesis before I get to there..... (nervous laughter)

I'm totally in the same boat as you raise cain, I'm fiendishly trying to write my MA Thesis right now, in hopes that I can defend in time (by Mid August) to be in Montreal by the First week of September. The angst is killing me, but the excitement/anticipation of being able to be in Montreal is keeping me going.

I've been accepted to McGill's East Asian Studies PhD program, but you're right of course, this thread should be about all schools in Montreal and not just McGill!

Has anyone started looking/researching for housing options? Anyone from the West/Vancouver like me too? If anything I'm most anxious about the cold, Vancouver's the coldest climate I've ever lived in, which doesn't really say much.

-Allen

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Hi! I'm also moving to Montreal for the Fall semester. I'll be moving there in June to start some French courses before my PhD at McGill begins in the Fall. If you are interested in meeting new grad students in the city just let me know! :-)

Kathryn

Hey there! I've been in Montreal for a year now, doing my PhD at Concordia. Would also love to meet grad students!

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Anyone else considering McGill for grad school this fall? I haven't yet officially accepted, though I am about 95% certain I will. I'm hoping to learn more about where grad students live, hang out, study, and any other relevant information anyone can provide! I heard the McGill ghetto is much more undergraduate than graduate student. I'd like to stay as close as possible to the MNI while still keeping in a relatively cheap/safe/friendly area. Suggestions for helpful websites to find housing? Also, any input on views of Montreal residents of Americans would be nice to hear more about. Essentially, I'd like to get as much information as I can before I commit to the school.

Thanks!!!

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