Jump to content
statgirl_96

Profile Evaluation: 2020 Statistics Phd

Recommended Posts

I'm honestly just curious to see if you think that with my credentials I could get into any PhD program. I'm at an odd point in my career--the original plan was to go for an Econ PhD, but I realized pretty quickly into my current job that I'm not interested enough in Economics for that. I still want to learn enough math to be able to answer interesting questions about the world, though. My current plan is to enter a statistics masters program with the hope to later apply for PhD spots, though if it's possible to just enter a statistics MS/PhD program now that would be great to know. I am NOT looking into schools in the top 20-30--I have somewhat realistic expectations, and also for me what matters more is location/what the professors specialize in. My interests lean towards environmental or applied statistics.

Undergrad: Top 50 Public University

Majors: Economics and Statistics  

GPA: 3.62

Student Type: Domestic, White Female

Math Courses: Calc 1 (B+), Calc 2 (A-), Calc 3 (B+), Differential Equations (A), Probability Theory (A), Math Stats (B), C++ Programming (A), Linear Algebra (B+), Stochastic Modelling (B+), Applied Regression Analysis (B), Time Series Analysis (A-)

GRE General: Haven't taken it yet, but I anticipate very good writing/reading scores and ~163 quant.

Math GRE: NA

Research: Undergraduate research for an Econ professor. I'm in my second year of a 2-3 year Research Assistant position at a government agency. I work daily with PhD economists. Most of my work is more data management/low-level statistics; I'm essentially on R playing with huge datasets all day. I am not on track to get my name on a paper during my time here, though I am involved in multiple projects. The work I do is not related to the field I want to go into (it's basically all finance-related).

Letters of Recommendation: One will probably be an Econ professor I was close to in undergrad. Another will be my chief, who I've worked with on small projects and have a great relationship with. A final one will be the economist I do most the most research with.

Concerns: My math grades are not great due to a mix of me being lazy/thinking that Econ was the most important thing to focus on in undergrad. I haven't taken Real Analysis, though I am doing so this Fall and intend to work harder in it than I did in my undergrad classes. I don't have any actual research papers to my name. Also, I don't have a clear vision for higher education (e.g. "I want to study the migration patterns of X animal since 2005 to prove that...") so I feel like I'd come off as someone who has no idea what they're doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From your background and profile, it seems like applying to stats Masters programs may be your best bet, instead of applying straight to PhD programs. Then, after your Masters, it should certainly be easier to get into a PhD program. Clearly explain in all your personal statements your reason for transitioning from econ to stats, and why.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oregon State is known for environmental stats, but I think that is a reach as I seem to remember them having pretty strict math requirements. But I'd say start looking around rank 60 and below for PhD programs.  Lower ranked biostat programs might be a good choice for you with your math background and interest in applied stats. If you could get an A in real analysis and a 165+ on your GRE, I think that would help ease some concerns about your math ability.  As the above poster said, I would apply to some master programs too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to apply straight to a Ph.D. program, I think it would be okay as long as you apply to mid level schools. 

I would take a look at: Florida State (chance of being unfunded), Virginia Tech, UVA and South Carolina. U of SC is a really great and friendly department

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.