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PhD Applicants: Fall 2020

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9 hours ago, smoothieman said:

Hi I was wondering if anyone knows what the "typical" funding package for a PhD student in a public health field is like. I know it varies by school and I know what schools say online or when they talk to me...but based on your own/friend's/family member's experience what funding situation can I sorta expect? Is it more common to only be partially funded for a year or fully funded for 4 years? Is funding typically from the school or from a mentor pulling from grants? Should I be looking for part time work/at external funding more seriously? Some folks at different schools have straight up told me that funding in public health is a issue at many schools currently.

I am just genuinely curious, and I hope I'm not asking for anything too sensitive.

Just some approximate numbers and points: (Hey friends, please edit or complete this list, it can be really time-saving and helpful for the next year applicants)

Yale : 36k guaranteed for 5 years with a responsibility of 2 semester TAship
Harvard: 36k guaranteed for 4 years with 1 semester TA responsibility (Hopeful2020PhD please correct me)
Brown: 36K guaranteed for 5 years, but all semesters should be RA or TA from the first semester
UCSF: almost 40k stipend for 4 years
Hopkins: Just tuition is guaranteed for 4 years, if get funded, almost 24k per year
Penn State Uni: 31k stipend (not sure about duration)
Tulane: 25k per year (not sure about duration)
UPenn: 34k per year (not sure about duration)
Emory: >30k (not sure about duration)
BU: >30k (not sure about duration)
UofMinnesota: 24-25k (not sure about duration)


Some top-ranked places in which it's possible to get admitted but without funding at least in the first semester(s): JHU - Columbia - Uni of Washington - Pittsburgh - UNC(?)


In my viewpoint--regardless of ranking, reputation, fit, and etc--just based on living expenses, years of guarantee, stipend, and responsibility: Yale and Brown are offering the best funding package among top 15 public health schools.


 

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I have to say that JHU's funding package is enormously disappointing, for a university that frequently refers to itself as the pre-eminent school of public health in the US (and globally). Being a graduate student is hard enough from an academic viewpoint, but having to be responsible for your living expenses during that time? 

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21 hours ago, leafypoet said:

Dear friends, I have some just wonderful news for you. I got into the Harvard School of Public Health Master of Science (Epidemiology) program, and will be taking it in addition to continuing my post-doc fellowship here at the medical school. I didn't get into the doctorate program, but this will give me an opportunity to finish my projects here and to fulfill my dream of being a physician-scientist. Whether I re-apply for the PhD remains to be seen, but my application for the next cycle might be more competitive. I am indebted to my professors here for pulling strings so that the financial burden won't be too great. 

Thank you all so much for your support. I really appreciate it, and hope I was able to support you also during this very stressful time. ❤️

CONGRATULATIONS!!!! 

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2 hours ago, leafypoet said:

I have to say that JHU's funding package is enormously disappointing, for a university that frequently refers to itself as the pre-eminent school of public health in the US (and globally). Being a graduate student is hard enough from an academic viewpoint, but having to be responsible for your living expenses during that time? 

I went there for my master's degree and wasn't impressed with the effort put into the students for being the #1 school in the country. Obviously this may be different for PhD programs, but I felt that professors were so busy chasing grants that they didn't have time to prepare for classes properly. I don't think they fund their faculty particularly well either, and kind of get the impression that they put a lot of emphasis on the name value on your CV in terms of compensation. Granted, the COL in Baltimore is way cheaper than in Boston,NYC, SF etc.  Just my 2 cents. 

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8 hours ago, MDMS2020 said:

Just some approximate numbers and points: (Hey friends, please edit or complete this list, it can be really time-saving and helpful for the next year applicants)

Yale : 36k guaranteed for 5 years with a responsibility of 2 semester TAship
Harvard: 36k guaranteed for 4 years with 1 semester TA responsibility (Hopeful2020PhD please correct me)
Brown: 36K guaranteed for 5 years, but all semesters should be RA or TA from the first semester
UCSF: almost 40k stipend for 4 years
Hopkins: Just tuition is guaranteed for 4 years, if get funded, almost 24k per year
Penn State Uni: 31k stipend (not sure about duration)
Tulane: 25k per year (not sure about duration)
UPenn: 34k per year (not sure about duration)
Emory: >30k (not sure about duration)
BU: >30k (not sure about duration)
UofMinnesota: 24-25k (not sure about duration)


Some top-ranked places in which it's possible to get admitted but without funding at least in the first semester(s): JHU - Columbia - Uni of Washington - Pittsburgh - UNC(?)


In my viewpoint--regardless of ranking, reputation, fit, and etc--just based on living expenses, years of guarantee, stipend, and responsibility: Yale and Brown are offering the best funding package among top 15 public health schools.


 

Agreed with you - I can't believe Yale and Harvard offer the same for how different the COL is in Boston vs. Yale! Granted Harvard offers 20x the number of places. 

Edited by Soychorizo
Edit to add: I'll update with info when I have some to offer for west coast schools.

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3 minutes ago, Soychorizo said:

I went there for my master's degree and wasn't impressed with the effort put into the students for being the #1 school in the country. Obviously this may be different for PhD programs, but I felt that professors were so busy chasing grants that they didn't have time to prepare for classes properly. I don't think they fund their faculty particularly well either, and kind of get the impression that they put a lot of emphasis on the name value on your CV in terms of compensation. Granted, the COL in Baltimore is way cheaper than in Boston,NYC, SF etc.  Just my 2 cents. 

Thanks for sharing! Just out of curiosity, would you or other students think the name value of the school/program worth the smaller funding package?

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3 minutes ago, Soychorizo said:

I went there for my master's degree and wasn't impressed with the effort put into the students for being the #1 school in the country. Obviously this may be different for PhD programs, but I felt that professors were so busy chasing grants that they didn't have time to prepare for classes properly. I don't think they fund their faculty particularly well either, and kind of get the impression that they put a lot of emphasis on the name value on your CV in terms of compensation. Granted, the COL in Baltimore is way cheaper than in Boston,NYC, SF etc.  Just my 2 cents. 

That's interesting, thank you for sharing your experience. A few friends of mine had a similar experience to what you described and for that reason, chose not to apply to JH for PhD after completion of masters programs.

Additionally, almost everyone I talked to about JH had some sort of "be careful" or "make sure you really spend time there and get a feel for the environment" type of warning.

Of course, when you are numero uno, you are always subject to higher scrutiny....something to think about none the less.

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42 minutes ago, LisaNucar said:

That's interesting, thank you for sharing your experience. A few friends of mine had a similar experience to what you described and for that reason, chose not to apply to JH for PhD after completion of masters programs.

Additionally, almost everyone I talked to about JH had some sort of "be careful" or "make sure you really spend time there and get a feel for the environment" type of warning.

Of course, when you are numero uno, you are always subject to higher scrutiny....something to think about none the less.

Yes, this was one of a few reasons I also chose not to apply to PhD program there (the major one being they didn't offer exactly what I was looking for in terms of coursework). But yeah... East Baltimore (where JHMI is) is very very very different from the Midwestern city I grew up in, so it was a huge shock for me when I moved there. The crime in that area is bad, and one of the main reasons I moved away. There are definitely places to live that are more safe than East Baltimore (Mt. Vernon, Charles village near homewood) and the area around JHMI is gentrifying rather quickly, so it might not be the case in a few years. But for a 5+ year program, you should 100% ensure that you could live there. 

44 minutes ago, meatbao said:

Thanks for sharing! Just out of curiosity, would you or other students think the name value of the school/program worth the smaller funding package?

I have to say I got a great job graduating with a Master's but I also have an interesting skillset that is in high demand right now. On the whole most of my friends from Hopkins are still doing research assistant type jobs. I'm not sure how much the value would change with a doctorate but maybe take a look at LinkedIn and see what graduates of the program are doing? Also COL in Baltimore is relatively cheap. You could buy a huge house a little north of the city for 300K. 

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I'll chime into this conversation about Hopkins. I just got back from visiting the HPM department, and I think the above thoughts resonate with my expectations and experience.

My main concerns were funding, safety in Baltimore, academic quarter system, and feeling overwhelmed and lost in a large school of public health and not very clearly seeing how I and my research interests might plug in right away. Overall, I left with a positive impression and most of my concerns were addressed (to varying degrees of satisfaction).

1. Funding. This irked me the most, as my stipend is 24k for 3 years guaranteed, which is cut in half during the 4th year. I brought this up with every professor I met with (maybe 7/8?) and each person seemed to have a very "don't worry about it" mentality. Talking to students, funding ultimately doesn't seem like a problem because of COL and research opportunities, but I had wish that professors had been more sympathetic and understanding that 12k is likely not a living wage and thus ridiculous. A lot of professors said that you would almost certainly augment that base stipend by doing research and get paid $20-$25/hr, but I still feel like that very much undervalues our time (maybe I have been too spoiled in the past...is this just phd life?). So overall, not thrilled with the funding package.

2. Safety in Baltimore. I am from the area so knew what I was getting into. It's very much a block-by-block situation. But by and large I was really impressed with the safety in areas that Hopkins grad students tend to live (which inherently makes me slightly ashamed. Segregation and the division of class/race is a huge issue in this city, and gentrification is also very real). Canton, Fells, Mt. Vernon all seemed really great and safe. If I do go to Hopkins, I'd love to spend some time working in the community in some way and trying to improve life for others less fortunate...cause it's right there. every block.

3. Academic quarter system. Nothing much I can do about it. The pros are that you can take a lot of different classes. The cons are they move fast and every 3 weekends you prepping for midterms or finals, which does not sound fun.

4. feeling overwhelmed and lost. It's a 4 year program so don't have much time to navigate the school and the department before I feel that I should be diving in. But all the professors were really great and could immediately identify 1-2 handfuls of people whose research matched my own interests and outlined ways I could build a team, one that included my assigned adviser or otherwise. I feel a lot of support and they assured me it was natural to feel overwhelmed (even the professors shared the sentiment), but there are ways to navigate strategically.

Finally, @Soychorizo's point about professors chasing grants. I was explicitly told that Hopkins operates under this mentality where they want junior faculty to chase grants and do their own thing and they want senior faculty to mentor PhD students. So that's kind of the model they pursued and I can definitely see how the hundreds of Masters students might feel neglected under such a system.

The current students I met were all great and seemed happy about quality of life -- which is a huge plus for me!

Woo!! Unable to keep it short and sweet, but here's my 2 cents, for what it's worth!

Edited by HealthPolicy2020

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@healthpolicy2020 Amazing overview!!! I agree with pretty much every point you brought up but my perspective definitely tends towards the negative. I know many, many people who lived there for years and continue to live there though and enjoy it! It's all what you make of it, but I do think you need to know a full picture before making a 5+ year commitment. For anyone considering JHU: 

1) Thanks for bringing up the academic calendar - I came from a school that did 10 week quarters (rather than Hopkin's 8 weeks) but still found the 8 week program very stressful compared to my undergraduate experience. Just a heads  up that sometimes they don't even put a weekend in between two grading periods, you may end exams on a Wednesday and start the new term on a Thursday. There's no such thing as a reading period there. 

2) Location: You should definitely try to have a car. Bmore is a food desert and it's not easy to get to the grocery store from any of the student living areas listed above. Safety is definitely a huge issue. The block-by-block changes means you're never truly insulated from crime (which agreed with @HealthPolicy2020, made me really sad to face because it's very racially segregated). I lived in Canton/Fells, and my neighbor had a gun pointed in his face and the iPhone stolen out of his hand and was not fazed as he had lived there for 20 years. My neighbor across the street had the wheels stolen off his car, while another had her car stolen when she was taking her groceries into her house. It becomes a part of your life to be careful, but I don't personally know anyone who was physically harmed, if that helps. Again, there are plenty of people who live there without a problem, but everyone knows someone who was a victim of at least petty theft - on that note, please, for the love of god, do not get packages delivered to your door. 

3) For funding - you can definitely live in Baltimore on 20-25 an hour (with roommates) don't worry about that unless you have dependents. I had a similar experience asking about funding at Harvard - the program I applied to said that the middle years of your dissertation writing are not funded, but no one really worries about getting funding for those. I would take them at their word for that. I'm sure there is plenty of grant money floating around for graduate students! 

Edited to add: Sorry for being so negative BUT if this is all okay with you, you get to work with some of the coolest faculty and do work on the most amazing projects in the world!! I loved the faculty and also met some of my best friends there. Your peers will have done really amazing things and you will def get opportunities that you wouldn't at a smaller school so take advantage of the wealth of knowledge there :) Also take Stata programming, the guy who teaches it is hilarious. 

Edited by Soychorizo

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13 hours ago, MDMS2020 said:

Just some approximate numbers and points: (Hey friends, please edit or complete this list, it can be really time-saving and helpful for the next year applicants)

Yale : 36k guaranteed for 5 years with a responsibility of 2 semester TAship
Harvard: 36k guaranteed for 4 years with 1 semester TA responsibility (Hopeful2020PhD please correct me)
Brown: 36K guaranteed for 5 years, but all semesters should be RA or TA from the first semester
UCSF: almost 40k stipend for 4 years
Hopkins: Just tuition is guaranteed for 4 years, if get funded, almost 24k per year
Penn State Uni: 31k stipend (not sure about duration)
Tulane: 25k per year (not sure about duration)
UPenn: 34k per year (not sure about duration)
Emory: >30k (not sure about duration)
BU: >30k (not sure about duration)
UofMinnesota: 24-25k (not sure about duration)


Some top-ranked places in which it's possible to get admitted but without funding at least in the first semester(s): JHU - Columbia - Uni of Washington - Pittsburgh - UNC(?)


In my viewpoint--regardless of ranking, reputation, fit, and etc--just based on living expenses, years of guarantee, stipend, and responsibility: Yale and Brown are offering the best funding package among top 15 public health schools.


 

Thank you for doing this! I wish I had this knowledge *before* I applied the first time. And this is pretty accurate for UW, UCSF, and Harvard. It is so disappointing that some PhD programs would make unfunded offers at this level. 

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13 hours ago, MDMS2020 said:

Just some approximate numbers and points: (Hey friends, please edit or complete this list, it can be really time-saving and helpful for the next year applicants)

Yale : 36k guaranteed for 5 years with a responsibility of 2 semester TAship
Harvard: 36k guaranteed for 4 years with 1 semester TA responsibility (Hopeful2020PhD please correct me)
Brown: 36K guaranteed for 5 years, but all semesters should be RA or TA from the first semester
UCSF: almost 40k stipend for 4 years
Hopkins: Just tuition is guaranteed for 4 years, if get funded, almost 24k per year
Penn State Uni: 31k stipend (not sure about duration)
Tulane: 25k per year (not sure about duration)
UPenn: 34k per year (not sure about duration)
Emory: >30k (not sure about duration)
BU: >30k (not sure about duration)
UofMinnesota: 24-25k (not sure about duration)


Some top-ranked places in which it's possible to get admitted but without funding at least in the first semester(s): JHU - Columbia - Uni of Washington - Pittsburgh - UNC(?)


In my viewpoint--regardless of ranking, reputation, fit, and etc--just based on living expenses, years of guarantee, stipend, and responsibility: Yale and Brown are offering the best funding package among top 15 public health schools.


 

Emory is $31,775 per year, tuition waiver, and health insurance fully covered. Guaranteed for five years, with the expectation that you RA 12-15 hours a week your first year, and TAing both semesters your second year. Also, significantly lower COL than many other cities. I've been surprised how few people are talking about Emory on here based on ranking and support offered!

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13 hours ago, MDMS2020 said:

Just some approximate numbers and points: (Hey friends, please edit or complete this list, it can be really time-saving and helpful for the next year applicants)

Yale : 36k guaranteed for 5 years with a responsibility of 2 semester TAship
Harvard: 36k guaranteed for 4 years with 1 semester TA responsibility (Hopeful2020PhD please correct me)
Brown: 36K guaranteed for 5 years, but all semesters should be RA or TA from the first semester
UCSF: almost 40k stipend for 4 years
Hopkins: Just tuition is guaranteed for 4 years, if get funded, almost 24k per year
Penn State Uni: 31k stipend (not sure about duration)
Tulane: 25k per year (not sure about duration)
UPenn: 34k per year (not sure about duration)
Emory: >30k (not sure about duration)
BU: >30k (not sure about duration)
UofMinnesota: 24-25k (not sure about duration)


Some top-ranked places in which it's possible to get admitted but without funding at least in the first semester(s): JHU - Columbia - Uni of Washington - Pittsburgh - UNC(?)


In my viewpoint--regardless of ranking, reputation, fit, and etc--just based on living expenses, years of guarantee, stipend, and responsibility: Yale and Brown are offering the best funding package among top 15 public health schools.


 

Wow thank you so much for making this, it will be so helpful for people applying next year especially! 😊

 

My only contribution is that you’re right that UNC does only guarantee funding for the first year (unsure stipend amount), after that you’re on own I believe to find your own funding unfortunately ☹️

Edited by GlobalHealthPhD2020

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7 minutes ago, kmande said:

Emory is $31,775 per year, tuition waiver, and health insurance fully covered. Guaranteed for five years, with the expectation that you RA 12-15 hours a week your first year, and TAing both semesters your second year. Also, significantly lower COL than many other cities. I've been surprised how few people are talking about Emory on here based on ranking and support offered!

When I tried to apply Emory, I noticed the strict requirement of maths. Although I learned a lot about statistics, I still missed some basic maths. I just give up applying. So disappointing.😕

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9 minutes ago, kmande said:

Emory is $31,775 per year, tuition waiver, and health insurance fully covered. Guaranteed for five years, with the expectation that you RA 12-15 hours a week your first year, and TAing both semesters your second year. Also, significantly lower COL than many other cities. I've been surprised how few people are talking about Emory on here based on ranking and support offered!

Wow that’s amazing! I didn’t apply because of how competitive the program is/fear of rejection (lol), but definitely wishing I had 😊

 

I hope this is one of your options, it’s such a phenomenal program!!!

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On 2/11/2020 at 11:34 PM, ad527 said:

Also - hello everyone! I'm new to this forum, but have enjoyed reading about all of your journeys. Would definitely like to reiterate that everything happens for a reason - rejections are not a reflection of you being a "bad" applicant, just a reflection of the department not being the best fit at that time. 

Is there anyone else still waiting to hear from UNC MCH? I have seen acceptance/rejections, but I have yet to hear anything. For those accepted - did you interview?

Also did anyone else interview with Hopkins' Population, Family and Reproductive Health department? I asked the interviewers many questions, but neglected to ask about next steps/timeline of when we would hear back. 

Any insight appreciated - good luck to everyone as this roller coaster of a process continues! :) 

PopFam emails sent out today, btw! Fingers crossed you get wonderful news! 

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16 hours ago, Soychorizo said:

I went there for my master's degree and wasn't impressed with the effort put into the students for being the #1 school in the country. Obviously this may be different for PhD programs, but I felt that professors were so busy chasing grants that they didn't have time to prepare for classes properly. I don't think they fund their faculty particularly well either, and kind of get the impression that they put a lot of emphasis on the name value on your CV in terms of compensation. Granted, the COL in Baltimore is way cheaper than in Boston,NYC, SF etc.  Just my 2 cents. 

Hi. I am an international student.   I was offered MHS mental health at jh. I am looking for a way to fund my education , and look after a pre school kid. I was wondering what options do I  have ? Is it worth taking an education loan?  

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17 hours ago, GlobalHealthPhD2020 said:

Wow thank you so much for making this, it will be so helpful for people applying next year especially! 😊

 

My only contribution is that you’re right that UNC does only guarantee funding for the first year (unsure stipend amount), after that you’re on own I believe to find your own funding unfortunately ☹️

I don’t believe that’s accurate. Gillings School of Global Public Health only accepts students if there is funding available, although it comes from a faculty member, meaning you’re assigned an advisor from the start. I was offered about $26k/year, as well as full tuition and health insurance, guaranteed for at least four years. 

I was impressed with Emory’s and Harvard’s offers, but as mentioned by others, wholly underwhelmed with JHU’s. 

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On 2/21/2020 at 12:59 AM, MDMS2020 said:

Just some approximate numbers and points: (Hey friends, please edit or complete this list, it can be really time-saving and helpful for the next year applicants)

Yale : 36k guaranteed for 5 years with a responsibility of 2 semester TAship
Harvard: 36k guaranteed for 4 years with 1 semester TA responsibility (Hopeful2020PhD please correct me)
Brown: 36K guaranteed for 5 years, but all semesters should be RA or TA from the first semester
UCSF: almost 40k stipend for 4 years
Hopkins: Just tuition is guaranteed for 4 years, if get funded, almost 24k per year
Penn State Uni: 31k stipend (not sure about duration)
Tulane: 25k per year (not sure about duration)
UPenn: 34k per year (not sure about duration)
Emory: >30k (not sure about duration)
BU: >30k (not sure about duration)
UofMinnesota: 24-25k (not sure about duration)


Some top-ranked places in which it's possible to get admitted but without funding at least in the first semester(s): JHU - Columbia - Uni of Washington - Pittsburgh - UNC(?)


In my viewpoint--regardless of ranking, reputation, fit, and etc--just based on living expenses, years of guarantee, stipend, and responsibility: Yale and Brown are offering the best funding package among top 15 public health schools.


 

My offer from JHU was 30.5k fully funded for 5 years with health insurance and a responsibility of TAship once a year. 

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6 hours ago, GradApp2020 said:

I don’t believe that’s accurate. Gillings School of Global Public Health only accepts students if there is funding available, although it comes from a faculty member, meaning you’re assigned an advisor from the start. I was offered about $26k/year, as well as full tuition and health insurance, guaranteed for at least four years. 

I was impressed with Emory’s and Harvard’s offers, but as mentioned by others, wholly underwhelmed with JHU’s. 

When I interviewed and asked about funding, the health behavior admissions member said that they only guarantee funding for the first year as they are a state school with not enough private funding! I’m not sure what program you interviewed with but maybe the funding is different? 😊

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1 minute ago, GlobalHealthPhD2020 said:

When I interviewed and asked about funding, the health behavior admissions member said that they only guarantee funding for the first year as they are a state school with not enough private funding! I’m not sure what program you interviewed with but maybe the funding is different? 😊

 

6 hours ago, ehs20app said:

My offer from JHU was 30.5k fully funded for 5 years with health insurance and a responsibility of TAship once a year. 

Also worth noting that all departments within the same school can have different funding available! All of my funding is related to health behavior, but I know it can be totally different for nutrition/EHS 😊

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13 hours ago, Shiree said:

Hi. I am an international student.   I was offered MHS mental health at jh. I am looking for a way to fund my education , and look after a pre school kid. I was wondering what options do I  have ? Is it worth taking an education loan?  

I would contact the school about this! I’m american so had access to federal loans, but I’m not sure what you would be able to apply for. The administrative staff at the school are very kind and can point you in the right direction ❤️ 

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Hello, anyone get any response from Rutgers (PhD biostatistics) or UofI Chicago (PhD Biostatistics)?? Haven't heard anything and i'm dying inside. 

Thanks and good luck to everyone still waiting!

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On 2/21/2020 at 9:40 AM, Soychorizo said:

I went there for my master's degree and wasn't impressed with the effort put into the students for being the #1 school in the country. Obviously this may be different for PhD programs, but I felt that professors were so busy chasing grants that they didn't have time to prepare for classes properly. I don't think they fund their faculty particularly well either, and kind of get the impression that they put a lot of emphasis on the name value on your CV in terms of compensation. Granted, the COL in Baltimore is way cheaper than in Boston,NYC, SF etc.  Just my 2 cents. 

Living in Baltimore, I have heard this multiple times. My coworkers husband works for JH (not SPH), and she says everyone is there for the name, not the pay and benefits. And I actually disliked their doctors when I tried to go there for a cancer second opinion. I’ve switched almost all my healthcare to the University of MD system. I’ve had several doctors who have ties to JH (fellowship, wives there, etc), and none of them stayed. I find it kind of fascinating. 

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Hi guys, just want to check if anyone applied to Wharton Health Econ or UC Berkeley Health Policy. Thanks! 

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