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1 minute ago, mmmmcoffee said:

Hi guys! I have two interviews/visit days coming up on the same weekend and both of these programs are my top choices. I'm so stressed about having to make a decision between them bc I know both of the POIs pretty well already!

For those of you that interviewed already, what are your favorite questions that you asked? What questions do you think produced the most insightful answers that will help you make a decision when deciding where to attend?

I always asked some variation of “what is your favourite thing about the program/department?” I thought it was interesting because sometimes I got wildly different answers, while other times all the faculty gave the same answer (unintentionally). 
 

Similarly, I like asking why I should choose that program. Faculty seem to like that question and I’ve always gotten good responses.

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Hey, that's exceedingly unfair and unkind.    Honestly, if a school decided against me for my use of a perfectly valid word...that seems like a place that would be way too high stress and ju

It was just a piece of advice but the way you responded to this kind of proves my point of immaturity. Best of luck in this process! 

I was invited to participate in this cycle's Clinical Psychology PhD interviews. Here's some basic insight on being interviewed by current PhD students in a group setting: We were looking for p

2 minutes ago, springxsummer said:

Throwing this out there one more time: does anyone have experience with/ tips for group interviews? I have a group skype interview and have no idea what to expect. I wasn't given the option of an in-person interview. 

I would also be interested in hearing any experience people have had. I have an in-person group interview coming up!

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2 hours ago, springxsummer said:

Throwing this out there one more time: does anyone have experience with/ tips for group interviews? I have a group skype interview and have no idea what to expect. I wasn't given the option of an in-person interview. 

 

2 hours ago, Cascadia said:

I would also be interested in hearing any experience people have had. I have an in-person group interview coming up!

I hate group interviews, because you do not have the ability to build rapport. It's more of a rapid fire question and answer period. I would suggest attempting to speak first once or twice, but don't try and dominate by answering first every time. Try to use other students name if you have an answer similar to them (i.e. "Similar to ____, I also find cognitive behavioral therapy to be the most intriguing"). Helps to make you look more sociable. This should be obvious, but never try to one-up the other people. From what I've heard, group interviews are more about how you interact with the others rather than your actual answers. Don't take this time to brag about your achievements, rather just try to give thoughtful answers. Hope this helps!

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31 minutes ago, Psychintraining said:

 

I hate group interviews, because you do not have the ability to build rapport. It's more of a rapid fire question and answer period. I would suggest attempting to speak first once or twice, but don't try and dominate by answering first every time. Try to use other students name if you have an answer similar to them (i.e. "Similar to ____, I also find cognitive behavioral therapy to be the most intriguing"). Helps to make you look more sociable. This should be obvious, but never try to one-up the other people. From what I've heard, group interviews are more about how you interact with the others rather than your actual answers. Don't take this time to brag about your achievements, rather just try to give thoughtful answers. Hope this helps!

Thank you! Would you happen to remember any specific questions that were asked?

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4 hours ago, Psychintraining said:

 

I hate group interviews, because you do not have the ability to build rapport. It's more of a rapid fire question and answer period. I would suggest attempting to speak first once or twice, but don't try and dominate by answering first every time. Try to use other students name if you have an answer similar to them (i.e. "Similar to ____, I also find cognitive behavioral therapy to be the most intriguing"). Helps to make you look more sociable. This should be obvious, but never try to one-up the other people. From what I've heard, group interviews are more about how you interact with the others rather than your actual answers. Don't take this time to brag about your achievements, rather just try to give thoughtful answers. Hope this helps!

That sounds super weird, but it makes sense that they’d be looking to see how you interact with others... the school I’m applying to has done a lot already to try to get a sense of personality/ counselling qualities.  These are good tips, thank you!

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Some insight after my first interview (this was for a research-intensive Counseling Psych program):

-Definitely have a specific idea for a study you would like to propose. They don't expect you to actually follow through with it, but they will definitely ask. I was a little thrown by how much detail they wanted - measures, hypotheses, etc. However I don't think asking for that degree of detail is super common; I was told these were a pretty intense pair of faculty members who interrogated me about this. But it doesn't hurt to have the details nailed down should it come up. They want to see you have realistic ideas and can form hypotheses.

-Know your own research!! I can't stress this enough. In the same interview I was just discussing previously, I was telling them about my senior thesis which used mediational/moderational statistical analyses. One of the faculty member then asked "Could you please explain to me what mediation and moderation really mean?" I was able to explain it, but this was research I had done 3 years ago...so know your stuff.

-In my clinical/practice-focused interview I was given a case study and asked to assess the case/make diagnoses. It wasn't hard, but still, something to be aware of.

- Overall it's really not that bad. 20 minutes feels like 5 minutes when you enjoy talking about your research. You should seem passionate and excited - I got a lot of really positive facial feedback when they saw how passionate I was (or maybe they thought I was crazy - who knows). And it makes time go that much faster.

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I leave for an in-person Open House tomorrow. I am printing off my CV just in case anyone asks for it. I want to print it double sided for enviro-friendly reasons. Google says it's a no go, but I'm really passionate about eco-friendly initiatives so I am leaning towards double-sided despite the warnings not to. Thoughts?

Thanks!

Edit: my CV is 6 pages 😬

Edited by Cascadia
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7 minutes ago, Cascadia said:

I leave for an in-person Open House tomorrow. I am printing off my CV just in case anyone asks for it. I want to print it double sided for enviro-friendly reasons. Google says it's a no go, but I'm really passionate about eco-friendly initiatives so I am leaning towards double-sided despite the warnings not to. Thoughts?

Thanks!

Edit: my CV is 6 pages 😬

That should be totally fine. In fact, I've not brought along any copies during my interviews. If asked I will offer to e-mail it to them, but I've been on 7 interviews and have not been asked once.

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9 minutes ago, Cascadia said:

I leave for an in-person Open House tomorrow. I am printing off my CV just in case anyone asks for it. I want to print it double sided for enviro-friendly reasons. Google says it's a no go, but I'm really passionate about eco-friendly initiatives so I am leaning towards double-sided despite the warnings not to. Thoughts?

Thanks!

Edit: my CV is 6 pages 😬

I have never heard of double-sided being a no go. And honestly, if that's what the interviewer gets irked by, then I can only imagine how horrible they would be to work with on a regular basis. 

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Some things I saw people do that gave of bad vibes:

- Not talk with anybody (creep vibes) or only talk with people who are in their prospective lab. We are ALL going to give feedback on you as grad students if we can. NEVER say things like oh 'I don't want to talk with X/X's prospectives/X's grad student because I'm not going to go to their lab anyway' - that is just rude). It doesn't mean that you have to talk with EVERY person in the room, but try to just talk with people and just ask where they're from and what their research is about. Probably ask what they like about their current school and what the school could do better.
- Generally don't say things as oh I don't have an research questions, I just like analyzing data or things like that. Know what you want to do - even if it's just a broad topic that you feel comfortable talking about. Like what are you interested in?
- Try to avoid making negative comments about your current institute. It's fine to ask about work-life balance and mentoring style. But don't frame ti as 'is PI easily available, because my current one is never there'.

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I was invited to participate in this cycle's Clinical Psychology PhD interviews. Here's some basic insight on being interviewed by current PhD students in a group setting:

  • We were looking for people who were open and insightful, as evidenced by some level of self-reflection. I asked students which population they'd have the most personal difficulty working with. Many answers demonstrated a lack of empathy, "I can't imagine why someone would ever do X." The best responses indicated meaningful introspection, offering a personal reaction to something specific.
  • If you're asked strengths and weaknesses, the same applies. By now, everyone should know NOT to humble brag by stating their weakness is taking on 50 different projects because they like to stay busy. We were looking for honest vulnerability over a superficial assessment of deficit. Perfectionism, procrastination, and over-work is par for the course for most students applying for doctoral programmes. You can always offer a genuine weakness first and then illustrate how you use a strength to compensate.
  • Be yourself. Relax. Obviously, be a professional and appropriate version of yourself, but we want to know if you'll fit in as a person. You've already met the academic standard. We want to know if we'll like being around you and working with you. This is a chance to know if you want to be around us.
  • On that note, own who you are. Some people presented as disinterested and unsure of themselves. During the interview, they offered snippets of information that indicated they felt they didn't fit in an academic environment. It was off-putting.
  • The students interviewers came from different years, 1-4. We had to complete a ratings scale that focused on our assessment of applicant personal qualities. We briefly discussed each student and agreed upon the scores. Make sure you present to us what makes you stand out as a person and not just a student, at least for clinical programmes.
  • It's your chance to make a great impression. Don't be forgettable. Out of approximately 20 students, about 8 had very similar research interests. Don't be afraid to get granular in order to differentiate yourself.
  • Be mindful of how you non-verbally react to other applicants responses. We can see if you're annoyed or think something is stupid.
  • Don't be late and don't sit where the other applicants can't really see you, i.e. in the row behind everyone. 
  • Think about attending the pre-interview mixer, if there is one. You may end up talking to someone who interviews you the next day, which certainly makes things more comfortable.
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22 hours ago, Psyche007 said:

I was invited to participate in this cycle's Clinical Psychology PhD interviews. Here's some basic insight on being interviewed by current PhD students in a group setting:

  • We were looking for people who were open and insightful, as evidenced by some level of self-reflection. I asked students which population they'd have the most personal difficulty working with. Many answers demonstrated a lack of empathy, "I can't imagine why someone would ever do X." The best responses indicated meaningful introspection, offering a personal reaction to something specific.
  • If you're asked strengths and weaknesses, the same applies. By now, everyone should know NOT to humble brag by stating their weakness is taking on 50 different projects because they like to stay busy. We were looking for honest vulnerability over a superficial assessment of deficit. Perfectionism, procrastination, and over-work is par for the course for most students applying for doctoral programmes. You can always offer a genuine weakness first and then illustrate how you use a strength to compensate.
  • Be yourself. Relax. Obviously, be a professional and appropriate version of yourself, but we want to know if you'll fit in as a person. You've already met the academic standard. We want to know if we'll like being around you and working with you. This is a chance to know if you want to be around us.
  • On that note, own who you are. Some people presented as disinterested and unsure of themselves. During the interview, they offered snippets of information that indicated they felt they didn't fit in an academic environment. It was off-putting.
  • The students interviewers came from different years, 1-4. We had to complete a ratings scale that focused on our assessment of applicant personal qualities. We briefly discussed each student and agreed upon the scores. Make sure you present to us what makes you stand out as a person and not just a student, at least for clinical programmes.
  • It's your chance to make a great impression. Don't be forgettable. Out of approximately 20 students, about 8 had very similar research interests. Don't be afraid to get granular in order to differentiate yourself.
  • Be mindful of how you non-verbally react to other applicants responses. We can see if you're annoyed or think something is stupid.
  • Don't be late and don't sit where the other applicants can't really see you, i.e. in the row behind everyone. 
  • Think about attending the pre-interview mixer, if there is one. You may end up talking to someone who interviews you the next day, which certainly makes things more comfortable.

This was so incredibly helpful! You are a godsend

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5 hours ago, Oluwachristabel said:

Hey guys,

How do you respond to scenarios where the PI or interviewer has explained things about the department or their style of mentorship that you really like.

I usually just tend to say. "Yeah, I really like that" but it feels hella inadequate.

 

You could try and tie it back to a mentor relationship that you enjoyed

 

For example, I have a very communicative and interactive relationship with my research mentor in undergrad. If a prof said they have a similar style, you could say something like "I really enjoy that mentoring style. I have a similar relationship with my current research mentor, and I really feel like I do my best work in an environment such as the one you described"

I also really love to say that I LOVE learning (which I do!). This also highlights the fact that you would take critical feedback well, etc.

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44 minutes ago, psychologygeek said:

You could try and tie it back to a mentor relationship that you enjoyed

 

For example, I have a very communicative and interactive relationship with my research mentor in undergrad. If a prof said they have a similar style, you could say something like "I really enjoy that mentoring style. I have a similar relationship with my current research mentor, and I really feel like I do my best work in an environment such as the one you described"

I also really love to say that I LOVE learning (which I do!). This also highlights the fact that you would take critical feedback well, etc.

I would be wary of using the word “love” to describe your emotions to interviewers. It can come off as immature during my experience of interviewing potential new students for our program. 

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1 hour ago, psychologygeek said:

You could try and tie it back to a mentor relationship that you enjoyed

 

For example, I have a very communicative and interactive relationship with my research mentor in undergrad. If a prof said they have a similar style, you could say something like "I really enjoy that mentoring style. I have a similar relationship with my current research mentor, and I really feel like I do my best work in an environment such as the one you described"

I also really love to say that I LOVE learning (which I do!). This also highlights the fact that you would take critical feedback well, etc.

Thank you! This helps

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1 hour ago, hopefulgrad2019 said:

I would be wary of using the word “love” to describe your emotions to interviewers. It can come off as immature during my experience of interviewing potential new students for our program. 

Thanks for this! I almost always say that I "really enjoy" or "am passionate about" in an interview setting. However, I say "love" a lot in day to day life which is why I typed it, lol

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Hi everyone!

I am interviewing at Rutgers next week for their clinical psych PsyD program. Does anyone have any insight into Rutgers' specific interview today? What types of questions should I prepare for, in general, going into a PsyD interview? Should I spend a great deal of prep time on my PI of interest or spend more time prepping for clinical topics of discussion? Any tips would be greatly appreciated!!! 

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Hi all! I had my interview recently and I'm looking for some insight!

The interview I had with my POI felt SUPER casual. To the point where I'm not sure if they really got to know me and my research interests well. I mean, I talked briefly about my experiences and how I got interested in the field, but other than that, we had a conversation that was tangential to my interests. I wasn't able to ask them many questions. It felt like a positive conversation but I left the interview wondering if I was able to sell myself enough. Does anyone else have experience with this? I mean, I figure they have my CV and personal statement & maybe it was just an interpersonal skills/personality check?

Additionally, I really felt like I hit it off with the grad students and was able to articulate my research interests & have intellectual discussions with them (as well as fun discussions, too!). They pretty much told me they'd love to have me in the lab, I'm their favorite applicant, the POI really likes me, etc. Of course, I feel like I should take it with a grain of salt & not get my hopes up too much, but is this a good sign? Is this common for grad students to say?

I do hope I get in because I really loved the program! Just want some objective opinions on all of this!

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1 minute ago, Aghhhhh said:

Hi all! I had my interview recently and I'm looking for some insight!

The interview I had with my POI felt SUPER casual. To the point where I'm not sure if they really got to know me and my research interests well. I mean, I talked briefly about my experiences and how I got interested in the field, but other than that, we had a conversation that was tangential to my interests. I wasn't able to ask them many questions. It felt like a positive conversation but I left the interview wondering if I was able to sell myself enough. Does anyone else have experience with this? I mean, I figure they have my CV and personal statement & maybe it was just an interpersonal skills/personality check?

Additionally, I really felt like I hit it off with the grad students and was able to articulate my research interests & have intellectual discussions with them (as well as fun discussions, too!). They pretty much told me they'd love to have me in the lab, I'm their favorite applicant, the POI really likes me, etc. Of course, I feel like I should take it with a grain of salt & not get my hopes up too much, but is this a good sign? Is this common for grad students to say?

I do hope I get in because I really loved the program! Just want some objective opinions on all of this!

I think this is a good sign! Honestly interviews often are just that, personality checks.

So much of this process is a black box and there are so many bureaucratic reasons that one may or may not receive an offer, but it sounds to me like you should feel good about your chances.

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Hey, y'all

I'm having problems coming up with some questions based off of my PI's research (the place I'm interviewing at doesn't adhere to a strict mentorship model, but I want to at least show that I read their stuff). I am interested in the research they have put out, but I'm having problems coming up with specific questions.

My interview is on Saturday. Does anyone have any advice for this? I want to make sure that I make a good impression.

Thanks!

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23 minutes ago, psychologygeek said:

Hey, y'all

I'm having problems coming up with some questions based off of my PI's research (the place I'm interviewing at doesn't adhere to a strict mentorship model, but I want to at least show that I read their stuff). I am interested in the research they have put out, but I'm having problems coming up with specific questions.

My interview is on Saturday. Does anyone have any advice for this? I want to make sure that I make a good impression.

Thanks!

I have been doing the same thing for the same program! I am hoping it is really conversational but my imposter syndrome has been in full flare.

Edited by ballostress
Realized I asked a dumb question!
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