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15 minutes ago, ballostress said:

I have been doing the same thing for the same program! I am hoping it is really conversational but my imposter syndrome has been in full flare.

Wait, are we interviewing at the same program?! It would be nice to see a friendly face lol. 

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Hey, that's exceedingly unfair and unkind.    Honestly, if a school decided against me for my use of a perfectly valid word...that seems like a place that would be way too high stress and ju

It was just a piece of advice but the way you responded to this kind of proves my point of immaturity. Best of luck in this process! 

I was invited to participate in this cycle's Clinical Psychology PhD interviews. Here's some basic insight on being interviewed by current PhD students in a group setting: We were looking for p

2 hours ago, psychologygeek said:

Hey, y'all

I'm having problems coming up with some questions based off of my PI's research (the place I'm interviewing at doesn't adhere to a strict mentorship model, but I want to at least show that I read their stuff). I am interested in the research they have put out, but I'm having problems coming up with specific questions.

My interview is on Saturday. Does anyone have any advice for this? I want to make sure that I make a good impression.

Thanks!

 

2 hours ago, ballostress said:

I have been doing the same thing for the same program! I am hoping it is really conversational but my imposter syndrome has been in full flare.

At my recent interview, here are a couple research-related questions I asked:

1. I noticed in this paper, you chose to utilize "x" measure over "y" measure, despite utilizing "x" in your other papers. Why is that? (Basically, I showed that I noticed a pattern in my POI's methods and noticed they deviated from this pattern in a particular paper. These 2 measures are very similar so I was curious as to why he chose one over the other)

2. I noticed you collected "this data" while examining "this research topic". Have you considered examining "this data" in relation to "this research topic"? (showing that their research inspired you to ask questions shows that you care about their line of research and have ideas of your own to contribute. For example, a faculty member I interviewed with collected racial-ethnic data while examining her topic of interest. I asked her if she considered seeing if race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between "x" and "y." I think she was impressed by this question)

Also, I skimmed most of these papers for the main ideas and went back to whatever I especially found interesting. I didn't spend a crazy amount of time reading every little detail (although it was tempting at times lol). Hope this helps!

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11 hours ago, MadiB said:

 

At my recent interview, here are a couple research-related questions I asked:

1. I noticed in this paper, you chose to utilize "x" measure over "y" measure, despite utilizing "x" in your other papers. Why is that? (Basically, I showed that I noticed a pattern in my POI's methods and noticed they deviated from this pattern in a particular paper. These 2 measures are very similar so I was curious as to why he chose one over the other)

2. I noticed you collected "this data" while examining "this research topic". Have you considered examining "this data" in relation to "this research topic"? (showing that their research inspired you to ask questions shows that you care about their line of research and have ideas of your own to contribute. For example, a faculty member I interviewed with collected racial-ethnic data while examining her topic of interest. I asked her if she considered seeing if race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between "x" and "y." I think she was impressed by this question)

Also, I skimmed most of these papers for the main ideas and went back to whatever I especially found interesting. I didn't spend a crazy amount of time reading every little detail (although it was tempting at times lol). Hope this helps!

This is super helpful, thanks! I think that I was getting sucked in to the temptation to read every little detail

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I suppose this is more for PsyD programs than PhD programs: is anyone else getting questions about your "theoretical approach"? I've been hesitant to answer, given that I don't specifically adhere to behaviorism, humanism, etc but I get the feeling that they want you to say *something* other than "I don't have one but I'm willing to learn." 

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2 hours ago, thelonelypuppet said:

I suppose this is more for PsyD programs than PhD programs: is anyone else getting questions about your "theoretical approach"? I've been hesitant to answer, given that I don't specifically adhere to behaviorism, humanism, etc but I get the feeling that they want you to say *something* other than "I don't have one but I'm willing to learn." 

I was asked this at a recent interview and I told them the approach I was most drawn to and the one that I felt would be most effective given the population I am interested in. You can look up articles with good evidence that a certain approach works well with your intended population and use this to shape your answer as well. Hope this helps!

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6 hours ago, thelonelypuppet said:

I suppose this is more for PsyD programs than PhD programs: is anyone else getting questions about your "theoretical approach"? I've been hesitant to answer, given that I don't specifically adhere to behaviorism, humanism, etc but I get the feeling that they want you to say *something* other than "I don't have one but I'm willing to learn." 

One way to go about is to steer into the orientation of the program (most will have a preference for something). What I did when I applied was say I am interested in becoming an evidence-based practitioner and I am not yet familiar enough with the intricacies to be able to confidently say I have a theoretical orientation. The program I am attending Bill's itself on evidence based practice and skews a little more towards CBT than psychodynamic and third-wave. This question will follow you by the way. I get asked at almost every externship interview, and one of the internship essays asks this question. It is basically the basis of your identity as a psychologist. 

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On 2/10/2020 at 2:19 PM, hopefulgrad2019 said:

I would be wary of using the word “love” to describe your emotions to interviewers. It can come off as immature during my experience of interviewing potential new students for our program. 

I used the term 'love' repeatedly in my recent interview. 

I guess I'm not getting in! Drat 

Edited by tomatotomahto
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4 hours ago, clinicalpsych.2020 said:

I was asked this at a recent interview and I told them the approach I was most drawn to and the one that I felt would be most effective given the population I am interested in. You can look up articles with good evidence that a certain approach works well with your intended population and use this to shape your answer as well. Hope this helps!

I got asked this at every interview and I just answered honestly. I'm already in a clinical masters and had to develop both my clinical theoretical approach for therapy and research theoretical approach for thesis, so it wasn't that bad. This is a good follow up question point, "Generally I am very postmodernist and clinically I fall back on narrative therapy most of the time, while research wise I have been using an intersectionalist and minority stress lens... You are postmodernist too, right?" Or "Oh but you said you use x model of therapy and while I haven't gotten to work with that a lot such and such about it makes a lot of sense to me because..."

Edited by PsyZei
*intersectionalist not internationalist
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On 1/13/2020 at 11:22 PM, andhowdoesthatmakeyoufeel said:

You're gonna be asked way less than you expect. Prepare yourself to ask a LOT of questions of the people you talk to. Don't run out of questions. 

I'm going to be the odd out and say that it's okay to run out of questions. I only asked the questions I couldn't get answers to otherwise. In one case 3 of my professors got their PhDs from the school and I literally just said "I would have a lot of questions but I've been talking to Dr. X and Dr. Z so much, I think I've had them all answered and then some," the response was "Knowing Dr. Z I'm sure that's true" and then the conversation continued). Once they and I ran out of questions it would just progress to a normal conversation topic relevant to research, the program, what living in the area is like, or something else.

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On 2/4/2020 at 1:23 PM, springxsummer said:

Throwing this out there one more time: does anyone have experience with/ tips for group interviews? I have a group skype interview and have no idea what to expect. I wasn't given the option of an in-person interview. 

I had a zoom interview that was me as the only interviewee but with a couple professors in on it. It wasn't that weird. They asked me what they wanted to know, there was only one part that was weird in that one of the professors asked me what to pretend the other one wasn't there and then tell them what I would want in the other one as a mentor. I just laughed a little and then answered honestly (which turned out really well, because what I like in a mentor turned out to be something that the professor's students either like or get frustrated about- so that I specifically said it was what I knew I was looking for in a mentor was pretty neat). We just talked and it was actually pretty short and sweet compared to interview days (was maybe half an hour). I was accepted to the program, so that wasn't indicative of a bad interview that was cut short, either. I'm not sure if that helps you any, though?

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On 2/4/2020 at 3:34 PM, Psychintraining said:

 

I hate group interviews, because you do not have the ability to build rapport. It's more of a rapid fire question and answer period. I would suggest attempting to speak first once or twice, but don't try and dominate by answering first every time. Try to use other students name if you have an answer similar to them (i.e. "Similar to ____, I also find cognitive behavioral therapy to be the most intriguing"). Helps to make you look more sociable. This should be obvious, but never try to one-up the other people. From what I've heard, group interviews are more about how you interact with the others rather than your actual answers. Don't take this time to brag about your achievements, rather just try to give thoughtful answers. Hope this helps!

Good advice! Be collaborative. Especially if you are looking at going for counseling or clinical- I looked at the group interviews as that they were evaluating us to see how we would do in group/systemic therapy settings and on how well we would be able to integrate into a cohort group. So I used a lot of reflection and collaborative language to talk or answer questions, "My answer is related to what Interviewee B was saying in response to Dr. X's question earlier in that...." 

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On 1/31/2020 at 5:23 PM, sparrow123 said:

I have a fear that because I am a married woman in my late 20s, it may be assumed that I want children soon and that that will make me a less attractive candidate. I'm 100000% not saying that folks with kids or those who want them are less attractive/capable, but I've heard soooo many stories about women being discriminated against in the workforce because they plan to have children or are pregnant, etc. Anyone have any thoughts about this? Is this a stupid thing to worry about? Has anyone received any questions related to family planning/relationships during their interviews? I'm guessing they're wildly inappropriate if not outright illegal, right? 

(Relatedly, I actually don't want children and don't plan on having them ever. But I also believe that is no one's business except for mine and my husband's.)

I am married and I have children, it's something I brought up in every interview I had. Point blank, I don't want to be at a program that is going to make it hard for me to live my life in a healthy and balanced way. Also, they do want to know who you are as a person, so while I received many questions about my family, it was not from the point of view of them screening me out. It was from the point of view of them wanting to know who I was. I spent 20 minutes talking/listening to one professor about the indoor and outdoor water parks in the area and how awesome they were and how much fun they are to go to as a family activity and what a great selling point they are for living in the area (and I was accepted to that program). Just be yourself and if they ask about your family just say it's just you and your husband and move on. You don't owe anyone any explanations as to why it's just you and your husband or if it will ever be any different from being you and your husband (in fact, over-sharing and explaining that might be worse than just making the statement and moving on, because  could be implicitly identified as defensiveness &/or reaction rather than response). That's been my experience with it, anyways- I'm sure you are right and there are many many who have had the types of experiences you are concerned about.

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What would you all say are the best questions to ask a potential mentor that will help you figure out fit? I've already looked at the questions on Mitch Prinstein's interview guide, but does anyone have any other questions that have helped them make a decision on choosing a program?

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10 minutes ago, 192020 said:

What would you all say are the best questions to ask a potential mentor that will help you figure out fit? I've already looked at the questions on Mitch Prinstein's interview guide, but does anyone have any other questions that have helped them make a decision on choosing a program?

Something I didn't think to ask in any of mine, but I would if I could go back, is if the mentor and their students (or the program as a whole) seems to foster/thrive best with a competitive or collaborative spirit. I am extremely not competitive. I like doing well and getting recognition, but I am collaborative by nature and am often uncomfortable when put in a situation or discussed in a way that is competitive in comparison to a cohort-mate or friend. One of the things that my supervisors repeatedly note about my therapy style is how collaborative I am with anyone in the room with me, and it's a running joke in both my family of orientation and procreation how not competitive I am when it comes to sports, games or really anything. I am happy when everyone is doing well, and I want everyone to do well.

That said, some people and programs really thrive on competition and there are some amazing programs out there with competitive culture.... and they would not be a good fit for me.

I never thought to ask about, though, until a professor brought it up at a group interview at my last one (he was describing the program culture and said something along the lines of if you are someone who knows they thrive and do well when competition is involved this may not be the best fit program for you, as their culture is on the other end of the spectrum towards collaboration). The sense of relief I got hearing that was profound, and I still wonder why I hadn't even thought about it as one of my criteria for programs before- since it is something that I've internalized as part of my identity.

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hi all :~) for those of you who have had interviews already, I'm wondering how in depth you were expected to go for the typical if you had to design your masters thesis etc/or just related questions on what kind of research you want to do..... I definitely can talk about my interests but I'm worried I'll come up short on details and seem ill informed or under prepared 😓I've been doing some reading just trying to formulate something concrete to talk about, but I'm just wondering how much detail professors expected from others regarding like specifics of study design for the research you want to do. thanks in advance!!!!!! 

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13 hours ago, tomatotomahto said:

I used the term 'love' repeatedly in my recent interview. 

I guess I'm not getting in! Drat 

It was just a piece of advice but the way you responded to this kind of proves my point of immaturity. Best of luck in this process! 

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1 hour ago, hopefulgrad2019 said:

It was just a piece of advice but the way you responded to this kind of proves my point of immaturity. Best of luck in this process! 

Hey, that's exceedingly unfair and unkind. 

 

Honestly, if a school decided against me for my use of a perfectly valid word...that seems like a place that would be way too high stress and judgment for me. 

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2 hours ago, hopefulgrad2019 said:

It was just a piece of advice but the way you responded to this kind of proves my point of immaturity. Best of luck in this process! 

I read the response as a bit of a joke or a nod to the realization that they probably did overuse the word- not as an emotional response at all (since drat is not an emotionally charged word or a word with an significant emotional connotation).

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2 hours ago, hopefulgrad2019 said:

It was just a piece of advice but the way you responded to this kind of proves my point of immaturity. Best of luck in this process! 

Truly sorry to have offended you by making a joke! This was really disappointing to wake up to. 

Edited by tomatotomahto
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12 hours ago, k0909 said:

hi all :~) for those of you who have had interviews already, I'm wondering how in depth you were expected to go for the typical if you had to design your masters thesis etc/or just related questions on what kind of research you want to do..... I definitely can talk about my interests but I'm worried I'll come up short on details and seem ill informed or under prepared 😓I've been doing some reading just trying to formulate something concrete to talk about, but I'm just wondering how much detail professors expected from others regarding like specifics of study design for the research you want to do. thanks in advance!!!!!! 

Hi! Most of the times I've been asked that question, it seems like they want an example of a specific research question that takes into account what opportunities the program/lab offers. For example, I would not propose a research question using an adolescent sample if the program does not have any faculty that have experience with that population. I would also have an idea of what you would expect to find in the results (based off of a few background readings). Overall, I think most people use this question to see if you are able to generate research questions and think a bit about their feasibility in a graduate program. 

I've also heard of some professors asking for a bunch of specifics regarding study design, but I never experienced it. Does not hurt to be prepared, but also if you don't know the answer, it's better to be honest! I think the majority don't expect you don't have a full study proposal ready to go since that's part of graduate school training anyways. 

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