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Accepted a school but still receiving interview requests


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I say write them a nice email thanking them for considering you and explain that you've already made a decision and won't be moving forward with the interview. It'll give them a chance to interview someone else who might've gotten a no, or been waitlisted. Congratulations and good luck!

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  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎1‎/‎21‎/‎2020 at 6:52 PM, blueberrymuffin said:

Hey everyone,

I was accepted at my top school and have committed to them. What is the best way to let the other schools know you will not be moving forward with the interview process?

 

Thank you!

Dear Dr. (Graduate Studies Director), 

Thank you so much for considering me for your program. Unfortunately, I have already accepted an offer from another school, and will, therefore, forego the interview. I wanted to let you know as soon as possible so that you can make adjustments.

Again, thank you so much for your consideration. 

Best, 

BlueBerryMuffin

Edited by StormChild
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19 minutes ago, StormChild said:

Dear Dr. (Graduate Studies Director), 

Thank you so much for considering me for your program. Unfortunately, I have already accepted an offer from another school, and will, therefore, forego the interview. I wanted to let you know as soon as possible so that you can make adjustments.

Again, thank you so much for your consideration. 

Best, 

BlueBerryMuffin

I would strike the word "unfortunately" because it suggests that your next stop isn't your first choice. Even if such is the case, it's the kind of information one keeps to oneself. You never know if the DGS at school B knows professors at your destination. "Yeah, BlueBerryMuffin told me that you weren't his/her first choice. How about that."

Also, in some disciplines and at some institutions, referring to a professor as doctor can be taken as a jab. A safer way to go is to address the recipient as "Professor Grey" unless you have ample evidence that Grey signs correspondence as Dr. Grey. A notable exception to this rule of thumb would be professors who attended HBCUs as undergraduates or graduate students. In which case, addressing doctors as doctors is likely appropriate.

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On ‎2‎/‎7‎/‎2020 at 12:14 PM, Sigaba said:

I would strike the word "unfortunately" because it suggests that your next stop isn't your first choice. Even if such is the case, it's the kind of information one keeps to oneself. You never know if the DGS at school B knows professors at your destination. "Yeah, BlueBerryMuffin told me that you weren't his/her first choice. How about that."

Also, in some disciplines and at some institutions, referring to a professor as doctor can be taken as a jab. A safer way to go is to address the recipient as "Professor Grey" unless you have ample evidence that Grey signs correspondence as Dr. Grey. A notable exception to this rule of thumb would be professors who attended HBCUs as undergraduates or graduate students. In which case, addressing doctors as doctors is likely appropriate.

Striking "unfortunately" seems fair. The logic behind it removing it seems sound. I can say, I've never met a PhD who was offended by being called "Doctor," but the easiest way to settle this would be to look at the letter that you received from the Grad Director and reply to match their correspondence.

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4 hours ago, Yas-man said:

There really doesn't need to be much thought put into this.

[...]

You don't need to provide a reason. They'll appreciate the timely response and brevity more than anything else.

IME, academic institutions and programs benchmark themselves against peers. Providing specific information as to why one declines offers of admissions (and jobs) may not help a specific individual, but the practice can lead to increased offers of assistance/compensation for future applicants/candidates.

And also, it's never too soon to start building one's professional reputation--there's a vast difference between brevity and curtness.

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