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Thoughts on WUSTL AM Statistics?


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Hi everyone:

I recently got accepted to WUSTL AM Statistics program, and I'm struggling to find any discussion about the program. All that I've seen during my searches on this forum and google are some rate my chances threads. I assume it's because of the small size of the class plus the fact that statistics is still part of the Department of Mathematics in WUSTL. Just wondering if anyone can add some information on the lack of information issue.

Here's a little bit of my background: graduated with BS in math/econ and statistics, worked in industry for two years as a data analyst (mainly writing machine learning analysis code. unsupervised, supervised, classification, nlp, etc.) After working in industry for a while I really feel that I want to do more advanced-level work.

Anyways here are some info that I've been able to gather about the program:

1. 7 faculty, 13 phds, 10 masters students in total (part of the Math Department)

2. Required courses: 5, including:

                                      a series of two classes (two series to choose from, one 400 level on mathematical statistics and one 500+level that's more proof based. 400 series might be taught by postgrad lecturers; 500+ by faculty)

                                      one out of two classes (one 400 level and one 500+ level on linear models. I couldn't find any meaningful difference in course description. Both taught by faculty)

                                      two 400 level classes on bayesian and statistical computation. Both taught by faculty.

3. Optional thesis

4. Two year program assumed by a line that says 'two semesters (or 18 units)' in the description and the program requires 36 units to graduate.

 

I do have three concerns for the program: 

1. It seems like this program is a 'cash cow' since it says no financial support. Does this necessarily imply lower quality for and attention given to masters students?

2. Even though there's a full phd outcome page, there is no mentioning of masters outcome.

3. Some classes (including required) are 400 level. Does this necessarily mean they are undergraduate level courses, or just being 400 due to administrative reasons? Some supporting info: the phd program also requires the two 400 level classes on bayesian and statistical computation.

Does anyone have any thoughts on the program? Or is there anything that can be inferred about the program based on the info that I found? Would really appreciate any help.

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