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Yeah I also think the 10-12 is much more feasible in the US since they have so many programs. It would be a stretch to find 10+ Canadian programs that are a good fit unless you have super common research interests or multiple areas of focus. 

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Hi all! I am a current clinical psych student at Queen's - I thought I would post here in case anybody was looking to get some advice. I recognize that this year is a bit weird with the pandemic

Good luck to everyone applying to year ☺️ I went through this process three times and got in on my third try. I'm currently at OISE in the Counselling & Clinical Psychology program - if anyone has

This is an updated Canadian thread (and American in the other tab) of schools in clin psych that have removed the GRE. With proof/links to website. https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1f6ZyVGn

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8 hours ago, freudianslipintogradschool said:

Likewise I’m only applying to 5 schools.. I really don’t want to settle for research that I’m not super passionate about since I hope to pursue a career in academia 

This might be the key detail - I aim to use the PhD to work as a clinician rather than in academia so the research fit aspect is something I'm willing to be flexible with somewhat (within reason obviously)

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59 minutes ago, shubeydubeydoo said:

This might be the key detail - I aim to use the PhD to work as a clinician rather than in academia so the research fit aspect is something I'm willing to be flexible with somewhat (within reason obviously)

On a seperate note: Is this something people are open about in their applications (i.e. not wanting to go into academia)? My understanding was that it was a major faux pas to admit this. This is what I've heard from other grad students and was warned against for my own interviews (I'm an incoming clinical student for 2020). It wasn't something I had to personally worry about as I think I do want to go into a career with both research and clinical work, but I know people who lied about their interests in their interviews to get in. I once also had a clinical supervisor at one of the most competitive schools in Toronto tell me that the committee found it to be a "failure" if their clinical students ended up wanting to go into a sole clinical career. Literally her words!! Not sure if every school frowns upon this though.

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10 minutes ago, Chebben said:

On a seperate note: Is this something people are open about in their applications (i.e. not wanting to go into academia)? My understanding was that it was a major faux pas to admit this. This is what I've heard from other grad students and was warned against for my own interviews (I'm an incoming clinical student for 2020). It wasn't something I had to personally worry about as I think I do want to go into a career with both research and clinical work, but I know people who lied about their interests in their interviews to get in. I once also had a clinical supervisor at one of the most competitive schools in Toronto tell me that the committee found it to be a "failure" if their clinical students ended up wanting to go into a sole clinical career. Literally her words!! Not sure if every school frowns upon this though.

I've heard the same thing and that's why I will not be talking about it in applications. Another thing to keep in mind is that these programs are long (6-7 years is the norm) so everyone changes a lot as a person over that time period. Who knows, someone like me might do a full 180 and end up solely in academia. But as of rn I'm defo leaning heavy towards clinical only, I'm even applying to med school alongside all these PhD's i.e. that's my level of commitment to clinical things as of today.

But yeah sadly you can't be open about it unless you're applying to like a PsyD probably. And only one of those in Canada is accredited

Edited by shubeydubeydoo
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37 minutes ago, shubeydubeydoo said:

I've heard the same thing and that's why I will not be talking about it in applications. Another thing to keep in mind is that these programs are long (6-7 years is the norm) so everyone changes a lot as a person over that time period. Who knows, someone like me might do a full 180 and end up solely in academia. But as of rn I'm defo leaning heavy towards clinical only, I'm even applying to med school alongside all these PhD's i.e. that's my level of commitment to clinical things as of today.

But yeah sadly you can't be open about it unless you're applying to like a PsyD probably. And only of those in Canada is accredited

Yeah, I wish there was more of a well-accepted avenue for those who wanted to be just clinicians. I understand the importance of having science inform your practice but I can't see how forcing people to suffer through 7 years (because I feel like if you really don't like research it will be SUFFERING lol) of research makes sense. And with med school, it's not really the same, because while therapy is integrated into their training, the majority of psychiatrists have to spend a lot of their time prescribing medication, so the blueprint for being a clinician largely focused on therapeutic intervention is just not really there...

I work with many psychiatrists now and even if I had the opportunity to go to med school over a clinical psych program, I think I would honestly choose another specialty lol.

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30 minutes ago, Chebben said:

Yeah, I wish there was more of a well-accepted avenue for those who wanted to be just clinicians. I understand the importance of having science inform your practice but I can't see how forcing people to suffer through 7 years (because I feel like if you really don't like research it will be SUFFERING lol) of research makes sense. And with med school, it's not really the same, because while therapy is integrated into their training, the majority of psychiatrists have to spend a lot of their time prescribing medication, so the blueprint for being a clinician largely focused on therapeutic intervention is just not really there...

I work with many psychiatrists now and even if I had the opportunity to go to med school over a clinical psych program, I think I would honestly choose another specialty lol.

Yeah that's true. I hope I'm faced with the conundrum of actually choosing which type of schooling to accept the offer from in 12ish months' time - not a bad dilemma to have by any standards. Medicine was what I thought I was going to pursue for the past 10 years of my life but this past year really opened my eyes up to how cooler clinical psyc is in terms of that integrated therapeutic perspective and not a purely biomedical one

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UPDATED GRE PRE-REQ LIST FOR 2020-2021 CYCLE:

USask - Not accepting GRE OR applications

Ryerson - Not accepting GRE + Not considering scores as part of application (https://www.ryerson.ca/psychology/programs/graduate/how-to-apply/gre-scores/)

UofT SG - https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/psych/admissions-how-apply

Calgary - Not required (need proof)

Queens - Not required (need proof)

Guelph - Not required (need proof)

York - Not required (need proof)

Keep the thread updated and lmk if I made any mistakes

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16 minutes ago, HopefulPsych2020 said:

UPDATED GRE PRE-REQ LIST FOR 2020-2021 CYCLE:

USask - Not accepting GRE OR applications

Ryerson - Not accepting GRE + Not considering scores as part of application (https://www.ryerson.ca/psychology/programs/graduate/how-to-apply/gre-scores/)

UofT SG - https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/psych/admissions-how-apply

Calgary - Not required (need proof)

Queens - Not required (need proof)

Guelph - Not required (need proof)

York - Not required (need proof)

Keep the thread updated and lmk if I made any mistakes

Thank you for compiling this! Can I ask what "need proof" means?

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1 hour ago, HopefulPsych2020 said:

UPDATED GRE PRE-REQ LIST FOR 2020-2021 CYCLE:

USask - Not accepting GRE OR applications

Ryerson - Not accepting GRE + Not considering scores as part of application (https://www.ryerson.ca/psychology/programs/graduate/how-to-apply/gre-scores/)

UofT SG - https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/psych/admissions-how-apply

Calgary - Not required (need proof)

Queens - Not required (need proof)

Guelph - Not required (need proof)

York - Not required (need proof)

Keep the thread updated and lmk if I made any mistakes

I attached an image of a list I was keeping track of - for every program that says yes that GRE is required right now, I emailed them to make sure, and the ones who have replied I include extra info in the brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?". Every program that I listed as No = they don't require it confirmed

Edit: the ones where I have no brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?" means they didnt reply to my email yet, and when I say "GRE Required?" is "No" it means their website says it or their email reply to me said it

Untitled.jpg

Edited by shubeydubeydoo
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7 hours ago, shubeydubeydoo said:

I attached an image of a list I was keeping track of - for every program that says yes that GRE is required right now, I emailed them to make sure, and the ones who have replied I include extra info in the brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?". Every program that I listed as No = they don't require it confirmed

Edit: the ones where I have no brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?" means they didnt reply to my email yet, and when I say "GRE Required?" is "No" it means their website says it or their email reply to me said it

Untitled.jpg

God's work! Can I hire you to keep track of my POI and graduate schools?

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This is an updated Canadian thread (and American in the other tab) of schools in clin psych that have removed the GRE. With proof/links to website.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1f6ZyVGn-opa_ijRyntHxfJJkaSNya4h-bwEDeDGInv4/edit#gid=1109387584

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On 7/10/2020 at 5:15 PM, Chebben said:

On a seperate note: Is this something people are open about in their applications (i.e. not wanting to go into academia)? My understanding was that it was a major faux pas to admit this. This is what I've heard from other grad students and was warned against for my own interviews (I'm an incoming clinical student for 2020). It wasn't something I had to personally worry about as I think I do want to go into a career with both research and clinical work, but I know people who lied about their interests in their interviews to get in. I once also had a clinical supervisor at one of the most competitive schools in Toronto tell me that the committee found it to be a "failure" if their clinical students ended up wanting to go into a sole clinical career. Literally her words!! Not sure if every school frowns upon this though.

I read a few Twitter and Reddit threads (yes I know...very legit) and the consensus is that there's a relatively lower supply of academic/research positions compared to other positions (e.g., just doing therapy, consulting, industry, etc.). An academic career is competitive to enter + thrive in due to the low supply of positions, less good positions (there are a lot of contract jobs that aren't stable or paid very great), and the academic environment itself. So, the stigma against getting a PhD and mostly doing clinical work seems like it's not based on reality. I've personally seen many PhD grads go into private practice or similar. 

But most Canadian Clinical Psych PhDs are based on a scientist-practitioner model. You're gonna do research, you're gonna learn how to do research, and you're gonna make a deal with some dude w/ red skin just so your results are significant. I think because of all these factors, it's pretty normal to say you're gonna focus on research and then do something different. I mean, so many STEM PhD grads go into industry every year. 

Edited by broski
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15 hours ago, broski said:

I read a few Twitter and Reddit threads (yes I know...very legit) and the consensus is that there's a relatively lower supply of academic/research positions compared to other positions (e.g., just doing therapy, consulting, industry, etc.). An academic career is competitive to enter + thrive in due to the low supply of positions, less good positions (there are a lot of contract jobs that aren't stable or paid very great), and the academic environment itself. So, the stigma against getting a PhD and mostly doing clinical work seems like it's not based on reality. I've personally seen many PhD grads go into private practice or similar. 

But most Canadian Clinical Psych PhDs are based on a scientist-practitioner model. You're gonna do research, you're gonna learn how to do research, and you're gonna make a deal with some dude w/ red skin just so your results are significant. I think because of all these factors, it's pretty normal to say you're gonna focus on research and then do something different. I mean, so many STEM PhD grads go into industry every year. 

Yeah exactly. Anecdotally, (though I won't give too many details to still have my real identity hidden), my dad is a professor at uni, and he often comments that he wishes he had a PhD that allowed him to work in industry more and not be stuck with academia only. I think I'd feel the same, having seen what being a professor is like behind the scenes and everything like it just doesn't spark my interest at all

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On 7/10/2020 at 11:23 PM, shubeydubeydoo said:

I attached an image of a list I was keeping track of - for every program that says yes that GRE is required right now, I emailed them to make sure, and the ones who have replied I include extra info in the brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?". Every program that I listed as No = they don't require it confirmed

Edit: the ones where I have no brackets beside the "yes" to "Emailed?" means they didnt reply to my email yet, and when I say "GRE Required?" is "No" it means their website says it or their email reply to me said it

Untitled.jpg

Little update - I believe Western is waiving the GRE as well! https://psychology.uwo.ca/graduate/future_students/application_process.html#application

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Hi everyone!

So excited this thread was started. This will be my first cycle applying (for reference, I'm applying across the country-- UCalgary, Ryerson, UVic, UManitoba, Concordia, URegina, Mac, etc.). In other words I'm really just concerned with getting in this round and finding a supervisor that matches my interests perfectly, no matter where that might be (not that I really had a choice, my research interests aren't that popular lol). 

Anyway, my main question is-- do we think that because the GRE was waived for the majority of Canadian schools, that the application pools will be much larger than usual? Seems pretty logical to me, and it's been kind of a terrifying thought. I know that most of us applying to clinical are in it for the long haul, but the idea that the program is way more accessible without the GRE has def crossed my mind. Maybe they'll be harsher with GPA qualifications? Thoughts?

Good luck to everyone!

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19 minutes ago, LMoll said:

Hi everyone!

So excited this thread was started. This will be my first cycle applying (for reference, I'm applying across the country-- UCalgary, Ryerson, UVic, UManitoba, Concordia, URegina, Mac, etc.). In other words I'm really just concerned with getting in this round and finding a supervisor that matches my interests perfectly, no matter where that might be (not that I really had a choice, my research interests aren't that popular lol). 

Anyway, my main question is-- do we think that because the GRE was waived for the majority of Canadian schools, that the application pools will be much larger than usual? Seems pretty logical to me, and it's been kind of a terrifying thought. I know that most of us applying to clinical are in it for the long haul, but the idea that the program is way more accessible without the GRE has def crossed my mind. Maybe they'll be harsher with GPA qualifications? Thoughts?

Good luck to everyone!

Also wondering about this question. I think research fit is still gonna be super important, as well as the other admission requirements. If you're a strong candidate already, then that would at least be better than people who apply just because the GRE was waived. 

What are your research interests? I'm curious what everyone's interests are 😃

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12 minutes ago, broski said:

Also wondering about this question. I think research fit is still gonna be super important, as well as the other admission requirements. If you're a strong candidate already, then that would at least be better than people who apply just because the GRE was waived. 

What are your research interests? I'm curious what everyone's interests are 😃

Hoping to match with a PI doing work with the geriatric clinical population-- so basically anything from biomarkers of dementia to caregiving interventions in the aging pop. (specifically those with age-related cognitive deficits!) I really can't be picky since there's maybe 10 PIs total that focus mainly on the elderly comm. and many of them aren't accepting students this year (ugh) Hbu?

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1 hour ago, LMoll said:

Hoping to match with a PI doing work with the geriatric clinical population-- so basically anything from biomarkers of dementia to caregiving interventions in the aging pop. (specifically those with age-related cognitive deficits!) I really can't be picky since there's maybe 10 PIs total that focus mainly on the elderly comm. and many of them aren't accepting students this year (ugh) Hbu?

Can definitely recall seeing a few PIs with geriatric psych interests, that's awesome! If that line of research is less popular, you might have a higher chance of being accepted by someone tbh, though I can't seem to determine what's a popular vs. less popular line of research. I'm into applied research with psychotherapy and analyzing the mechanisms through which therapy is effective. Also therapy with different cultures and ethnicities, optimizing intervention delivery/accessibility too. 

I'm having a similar issue with lots of cool PIs not accepting students this year ... really got me feeling some type of way but guess we can't control whether or not PIs accept students 😂   Anyways good luck 

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1 hour ago, broski said:

Also wondering about this question. I think research fit is still gonna be super important, as well as the other admission requirements. If you're a strong candidate already, then that would at least be better than people who apply just because the GRE was waived. 

What are your research interests? I'm curious what everyone's interests are 😃

My research background is definitely my biggest strength application-wise. I'm hoping a strong match with PIs will be a saving grace (my cGPA isn't the strongest) so I've been working really hard to gain research and clinical experience in somewhat overlapping but distinct fields:

1. Neurocognitive outcomes of mood and memory disorders

2. Mood disorders in forensic clinical populations

3. Improving clinical outcomes in youth with neurodevelopmental disorders

On one hand I feel like I have a broader range of PIs to chose from, but a part of me is worried that fewer PIs will be accepting students this year because of slow-down in research activities due to covid. Does anyone else feel this way? I hope this year doesn't turn out to be one of the most competitive cycles due to less funding/research opportunities post-pandemic...

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