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SIPA vs SAIS vs SFS vs Hertie


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Hey all,

I'm currently struggling to decide between the 4. Financially got: 25% from every school except SFS which gave me nothing :(

I started a relatively high paying job in tech recently but have always wanted to make the pivot into international econ policy work (but in the private sector) and thought this could be the perfect opportunity... until I saw my financial aid packages. Trying to ask for more money but no luck so far (any advice is greatly appreciated). Hertie is by far the most financially stable option and while I know their standard of education is high, I'm a bit worried about work opportunities in EU as a US citizen. With all of the US ones I was planning on studying abroad for at least a semester for more experience outside of the US (I made that a requirement for myself). Would love any insights as to which to pick or how to negotiate or even whether I should defer (with risk of losing all funding) so I'm in better financial standing before heading in.

 

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My 2 cents: don't go to any of them. Stay at your high-paid tech career, get involved with your community, do volunteer work, write for a blog or online magazine, go to conferences, learn the lay of the land. Then in a few more years, you might consider doing a part time or executive degree. Your prospects coming out of an expensive grad school may not be any better than working a couple more years and you'll have a lot less money. Or delay going by a couple years and get yourself better established beforehand to enhance your exit opps (employers will care most about your pre-grad school experience).

If you absolutely must go, go wherever is cheapest, but don't go to a European school or plan to work in the EU.

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Just curious why not European schools or the EU?

On 3/30/2021 at 12:08 PM, went_away said:

My 2 cents: don't go to any of them. Stay at your high-paid tech career, get involved with your community, do volunteer work, write for a blog or online magazine, go to conferences, learn the lay of the land. Then in a few more years, you might consider doing a part time or executive degree. Your prospects coming out of an expensive grad school may not be any better than working a couple more years and you'll have a lot less money. Or delay going by a couple years and get yourself better established beforehand to enhance your exit opps (employers will care most about your pre-grad school experience).

If you absolutely must go, go wherever is cheapest, but don't go to a European school or plan to work in the EU.

 

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On 4/2/2021 at 1:48 PM, dmm13 said:

Just curious why not European schools or the EU?

 

IMHO, no other region can hold a candle to the quality, drive, and sheer resources of a U.S. professional graduate school. +other countries, including/especially Europe, don't have the tradition of letting people reinvent themselves like we do in the U.S. +trying to get a work permit or build a career in the EU is a fool's errand, IMHO.

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3 hours ago, went_away said:

IMHO, no other region can hold a candle to the quality, drive, and sheer resources of a U.S. professional graduate school. +other countries, including/especially Europe, don't have the tradition of letting people reinvent themselves like we do in the U.S. +trying to get a work permit or build a career in the EU is a fool's errand, IMHO.

That sounds like little more than blind nationalism to me. 

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