Jump to content

2022 Application Thread


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 380
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I agree. Wait and drink heavily.

Accepted at Berkeley! Anybody else? 

Just wait until you go on the job market and are asked to upload your CV, and then the form auto-populates the field data from your CV except it gets it totally wrong and you have to delete every fiel

Hi, a question to the veterans. When citing foreign languages, is it possible to have segments of the original text in the footnotes or should it be in the body or not mentioned at all (only translation?)? I wanted to display my language prowess but I am not sure what to do with the original text. Thank you in advance. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/24/2021 at 9:03 AM, sayf said:

Hi, a question to the veterans. When citing foreign languages, is it possible to have segments of the original text in the footnotes or should it be in the body or not mentioned at all (only translation?)? I wanted to display my language prowess but I am not sure what to do with the original text. Thank you in advance. 

I've seen both in articles. I tend to prefer putting the original text in the footnotes, so that the reader look at it for him/herself and possibly understand nuances that the translation failed to capture.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/19/2021 at 8:31 AM, geschichte_2022 said:

Research Interest: Modern Korean history, Transnational history of East Asia, Decolonizing world, postcolonialism and the Cold War 

 
2. What is your recommendation for my application? 
3. Any advice to strengthen my profile at this point?
 

Hi, @geschichte_2022

I recommend that you develop a cohesive argument on how your research interests fit into your (provisional) vision of your career as a professional academic history. Do you have in mind existing historiographical debates that you'd like to advance? How do your secondary and tertiary research interests advance our understanding of modern Korean history? How does an understanding of the decolonization of Korea help us to understand similar processes on the other side of the world? 

Please work on your command of academic American English. I understand that the transition for native speakers of Asian languages to American English can be challenging. I personally think it would be churlish for members of admissions committees to not be sensitive to these challenges. And at the same time, it's likely that you'll be competing against applicants who have polished their writing skills.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/23/2021 at 3:43 PM, sonnybunny said:

I am about in the same place. Potential advisors locked down, now SOP writing. We have this!

A late October update - professors contacted, SOP drafted and reviewed, and I've started some of the actual apps. The biggest task I have on my plate is finishing the thesis chapter that I'm using as my writing sample before December 1st. No pressure, right? 😅

Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Go Weast Young Man said:

For SOPs does anyone have advice for how they should start? Not how to start writing them, but what's an appropriate kind of opening line. I'm pretty much done drafting but keep going back and forth on the organization.

I’ve been thinking about this too. I think attempting to start with an anecdote or quote is just too corny in my case. Maybe if someone has an actual relevant and interesting personal anecdote that would be good to start with, but I think I’m going to begin pretty straightforwardly. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Go Weast Young Man said:

For SOPs does anyone have advice for how they should start? Not how to start writing them, but what's an appropriate kind of opening line. I'm pretty much done drafting but keep going back and forth on the organization.

I liked using the free guide on WriteIvy. The big takeaway was NOT to start with "ive always wanted to study X" or anything else along those lines. If youre going to do an opening narrative, make it short and to the point. I just started mine by focusing on when I realized what I wanted to focus on and why a phd is necessary for that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fawkesbox said:

I liked using the free guide on WriteIvy. The big takeaway was NOT to start with "ive always wanted to study X" or anything else along those lines. If youre going to do an opening narrative, make it short and to the point. I just started mine by focusing on when I realized what I wanted to focus on and why a phd is necessary for that.

"Throughout history.... " or anything like that will elicit groans. Make a bold, declarative opening sentence.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, CoffeeCatsCorgis said:

A late October update - professors contacted, SOP drafted and reviewed, and I've started some of the actual apps. The biggest task I have on my plate is finishing the thesis chapter that I'm using as my writing sample before December 1st. No pressure, right? 😅

The SoP may be more important than your writing sample. Potential readers may decide that reading the former is less labor intensive -- and more revealing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Sigaba said:

The SoP may be more important than your writing sample. Potential readers may decide that reading the former is less labor intensive -- and more revealing.

Good to know, I really appreciate that! At this point, for my writing sample, I'm just trying to make sure I have something polished and cohesive that demonstrates original research. I began my SOP-writing process in June so I'm already on my third (depending on the school, fourth) draft of that -- but it would certainly not hurt to give it another edit.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/27/2021 at 12:12 PM, jpc34 said:

I’ve been thinking about this too. I think attempting to start with an anecdote or quote is just too corny in my case. Maybe if someone has an actual relevant and interesting personal anecdote that would be good to start with, but I think I’m going to begin pretty straightforwardly. 

For my SoP, I jumped right into the content to set up the questions I had. Nothing fancy. My opening line began "In the 1970s, yada yada...." 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/25/2021 at 4:46 PM, Sigaba said:

Hi, @geschichte_2022

I recommend that you develop a cohesive argument on how your research interests fit into your (provisional) vision of your career as a professional academic history. Do you have in mind existing historiographical debates that you'd like to advance? How do your secondary and tertiary research interests advance our understanding of modern Korean history? How does an understanding of the decolonization of Korea help us to understand similar processes on the other side of the world? 

Please work on your command of academic American English. I understand that the transition for native speakers of Asian languages to American English can be challenging. I personally think it would be churlish for members of admissions committees to not be sensitive to these challenges. And at the same time, it's likely that you'll be competing against applicants who have polished their writing skills.

Aside from everything Sigaba said, you may also want to check the specific second language requirements of different programs. Some PhD programs, for instance, support (and/or require) their Korean studies folks to have a few years of training in modern Japanese, etc, which you can do after you start the program. This means if you are also applying for MA programs and eventually decide to do an MA first, whether or not that program allows you to get trained in another language (you know, just to save time in the future) might be something to think about. 

Edited by AnUglyBoringNerd
elaboration
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm having SERIOUS issues with the amount of ads on this page. They are making the loading speed slower and they "cover" the "quote posts" button, making it near impossible to quote folks. Additionally, the @ option seldom works.

So, here are my responses.

Re: translations/original text @Go Weast Young Man: As a rule of thumb, I always include them, until I have to delete them due to word count. The main reason why they don't appear in journal articles/books is because of word count. In your WS you want to show mastery of research skills, including translations. I would welcome the original citation. 

Re: How to start a SOP, also @Go Weast Young Man, start strong. A brief (one/two sentence) vignette might work, or simply a statement. Here, I must stress how important it is to pay attention to @TMP and @Sigaba's advice. 

  1. Do not, absolutely not, give grandiose statements such as "throughout history" or, my pet peeve, "historians [do this or haven't done that]..." I can assure you I could find at least three objections by the time I get to the end of that sentence. And that's how we, historians, think; focused on the uniqueness of our case studies. Bring us a generalization and we will find the exception. 
  2. Do not, absolutely not, say things like "I'm passionate about history." Oh, yeah? We all are, sweetie, that's why we are here. Being passionate about something won't get you into a program. Furthermore, being passionate about history shows the AdComm that you have no idea what you are getting yourself into. Programs are trying to diversify what their PhDs do, so you have to be passionate about something else other than history. Personally, I cringe when someone says they are passionate about something. YMMV.

@Sigaba mentioned the importance of the SOP vs WS. Let me provide some context. We are teaching, advising, writing our books, revising our articles, reviewing other people's articles, sitting in some committee, writing letters for our students, grading... You see why your SOP should make me want to read your WS? If the SOP is not strong, the WS won't tell me anything that it isn't in your other materials. 

My $0.02.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey everyone - I've had mixed feedback on this so I was wondering if I could get your two cents. After I submit applications, is it a good idea to email faculty I've had positive contact/informal meetings with to thank them once again for their time and let them know that I've applied? My contacts were all in the late summer and I'd like to remind people about our discussions, but I do not want to come across as annoying/disrespectful of faculty time.

Edited by CoffeeCatsCorgis
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CoffeeCatsCorgis said:

Hey everyone - I've had mixed feedback on this so I was wondering if I could get your two cents. After I submit applications, is it a good idea to email faculty I've had positive contact/informal meetings with to thank them once again for their time and let them know that I've applied? My contacts were all in the late summer and I'd like to remind people about our discussions, but I do not want to come across as annoying/disrespectful of faculty time.

I'll defer to experienced posters on the forum, but in my experience communicating with professors, one has specifically asked that I notify him upon my application. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, CoffeeCatsCorgis said:

Hey everyone - I've had mixed feedback on this so I was wondering if I could get your two cents. After I submit applications, is it a good idea to email faculty I've had positive contact/informal meetings with to thank them once again for their time and let them know that I've applied? My contacts were all in the late summer and I'd like to remind people about our discussions, but I do not want to come across as annoying/disrespectful of faculty time.

I’ve similarly been asked to let one professor know when I submit my application. I can’t imagine it would hurt to send an email thanking them for their time talking/Zooming/emailing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, CoffeeCatsCorgis said:

Hey everyone - I've had mixed feedback on this so I was wondering if I could get your two cents. After I submit applications, is it a good idea to email faculty I've had positive contact/informal meetings with to thank them once again for their time and let them know that I've applied? My contacts were all in the late summer and I'd like to remind people about our discussions, but I do not want to come across as annoying/disrespectful of faculty time.

As long as you are not expecting a reply, it doesn't matter.

Also, a thank you email will never be annoying/disrespectful. But it won't be responded. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/10/2021 at 6:16 PM, AP said:

As long as you are not expecting a reply, it doesn't matter.

Also, a thank you email will never be annoying/disrespectful. But it won't be responded. 

Even if you get a response something like "Thanks for letting me know. I look forward to reading your application" or "Thanks for your note, it was delightful to speak with you as well." or any version of that.... keep your expectations low. You don't know what the application pool looks like and a lot of  times it's beyond, beyond your control.

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, TMP said:

Even if you get a response something like "Thanks for letting me know. I look forward to reading your application" or "Thanks for your note, it was delightful to speak with you as well." or any version of that.... keep your expectations low. You don't know what the application pool looks like and a lot of  times it's beyond, beyond your control.

Thanks, guys! Really appreciate the advice.

I'm getting ready to submit my apps in the next week or so -- I'm an MA student with a teaching position and a lot of extracurriculars, and I'm just getting them all done at once since my earliest deadlines are approaching. My attitude right now is "hope for the best and definitely prepare for the worst". I have really appreciated having this forum as a resource, wish I knew about it the first time! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, 

I've got a question mainly about LORs. So, one of the few good things about covid was that I managed to participate in a graduate seminar at one of the schools I am planning to apply for a PHD programme. One of the professors who taught the seminar who also gave me extended feedback on the paper I submitted, has agreed to write an LOR for me. However, I was also considering applying to the school where he would be on the adcomm(though in quite a different sub-field. I am a south asianist, he is an Americanist) and I wasn't sure of the protocol about asking him to write an LOR for this school. He has shown interest in my work but I wasn't sure of what the boundaries are. I do have 3 referees in hand in case he feels like it might be over-stepping.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.