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MLS versus MLIS

  

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  1. 1. Do you think there's a big difference between MLS programs and MLIS programs?

  2. 2. If unsure of career path after degree, would an MLS or MLIS be more useful/flexible?



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Hi Everybody!

I'm new to the forum and just starting to apply to programs. I'd like to hear opinions on whether you think there is a difference between MLS programs and MLIS programs. Also, what the reputations of different schools are. I am looking at CUNY Queens because I could commute and obviously the tuition is much more affordable then, say, Simmons. However, Queens offers an MLS instead of an MLIS.

I'd appreciate any thoughts, thanks!!

-Laura

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MLIS programs tend to have more technology based courses. These classes are beyond just how to use a database and simple web design which are pretty standard across the board. MLIS programs tend to have things like interface design, metadata, digital library building and other more in depth tech based classes.

The technology component is really important. If you take a look at job ads, there's a heavy tech component in a lot of positions and there seems to be a bit more demand for tech oriented librarians. There's a growing demand for technology in libraries, so there need to be librarians to meet it. I also think that the tech skills are something that can help a new grad get a position over a more experienced candidate without the tech background.

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Thanks for the response Phyl!

This was probably the answer I was expecting but also fearing - time to find an affordable, accessible, MLIS program

MLIS programs tend to have more technology based courses. These classes are beyond just how to use a database and simple web design which are pretty standard across the board. MLIS programs tend to have things like interface design, metadata, digital library building and other more in depth tech based classes.

The technology component is really important. If you take a look at job ads, there's a heavy tech component in a lot of positions and there seems to be a bit more demand for tech oriented librarians. There's a growing demand for technology in libraries, so there need to be librarians to meet it. I also think that the tech skills are something that can help a new grad get a position over a more experienced candidate without the tech background.

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Are you in the NYC area? I commute from Manhattan to Rutgers in New Brunswick and it's not bad and Rutgers tuition is low compared to a lot of the other NYC area schools. If an MLIS program isn't possible for you, you could try to make all your internships and work experience tech oriented or see if the program will let you take some computer science courses to count toward your degree. Rutgers belongs to a consortium which allows us* to take online classes with other schools and some of those have been techy, so maybe other schools have something similar.

*I've only heard of one person actually getting a slot in a course over 3 semesters.

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I'm about 90 minutes north of NYC in Dutchess County, I'm looking at Pratt right now, even though that would be quite the commute, I'm hoping I could make my schedule 2 days a week and stay with family down there if I have to. I'm also looking at University of Wisconsin because the program can be done completely on-line (I think they might be part of that consortium too)

Are you in the NYC area? I commute from Manhattan to Rutgers in New Brunswick and it's not bad and Rutgers tuition is low compared to a lot of the other NYC area schools. If an MLIS program isn't possible for you, you could try to make all your internships and work experience tech oriented or see if the program will let you take some computer science courses to count toward your degree. Rutgers belongs to a consortium which allows us* to take online classes with other schools and some of those have been techy, so maybe other schools have something similar.

*I've only heard of one person actually getting a slot in a course over 3 semesters.

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Ah then New Brunswick would be too much of a commute. I was between Pratt and Rutgers. The sticking point for me was the huge cost difference but it's a really interesting program.

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MLIS programs tend to have more technology based courses. These classes are beyond just how to use a database and simple web design which are pretty standard across the board. MLIS programs tend to have things like interface design, metadata, digital library building and other more in depth tech based classes.

The technology component is really important. If you take a look at job ads, there's a heavy tech component in a lot of positions and there seems to be a bit more demand for tech oriented librarians. There's a growing demand for technology in libraries, so there need to be librarians to meet it. I also think that the tech skills are something that can help a new grad get a position over a more experienced candidate without the tech background.

since the topic was brought up, I would like to ask a few questions (would appreciate detail in answers):

I am currently looking to get into academic librarianship, since my language skills and educational background are in demand and many have encouraged me. Questions are:

1.MLS or MLIS exactly?

2. I dont have a technical background but can get used to learning tools used in libraries in general (I'm guessing you dont need to know Unix, just be able to use new software to search and provide support!). I have a BA in English, so should I go for MLS or MLIS?? (academic librarianship is the goal here).

3. In terms of going for a masters, does this work out ideally: MLS first, then hopefully get a job at a good university, and then get another MA in field of choice (history, language, or something interdisciplinary). "choice" being field of academic librarianship I would like to specialize in OR go for a MA in "choice" and then pursue MLS??? Dont know which goes first.

4. What are the admissions office looking for in a candidate for a masters in library science? a good background in language? technical skills? what exactly should be "emphasized" on CVs?

5. In terms of experience, I have some cataloging private (and EXPENSIVE) libraries,...what exactly is ideal in terms of exp./internship?

6. Where can I find out more about the TYPES of librarians (seem to be many, even in academia) and what skills I can work toward and what SCHOOLS are best to attend? (I know Rutgers has a good program, and so does SJSU....and?)

thanks, I know I sound like a newbie (which I am to librarianship)......

cool.gifcool.gif

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Hi SamAli

I'm new to it too so I may not be the best person to answer but I'll give it a shot.

I think Phyl had a good answer to the MLS vs MLIS debate and I agree that the information piece is very important nowadays.

As for getting two different Masters, I'm not sure that's necessary, most MLIS programs have concentrations to get a little bit more specialized and if you're thinking History, I know there are a few schools that offer a dual degree in librarianship and history, would probably take a shorter time than getting the 2 degrees separately.

You definitely have more library experience than me so I'd say you're doing pretty good haha

Sorry, I don't have more for you, hopefully you'll get more responses.

Good luck!

-Laura

since the topic was brought up, I would like to ask a few questions (would appreciate detail in answers):

I am currently looking to get into academic librarianship, since my language skills and educational background are in demand and many have encouraged me. Questions are:

1.MLS or MLIS exactly?

2. I dont have a technical background but can get used to learning tools used in libraries in general (I'm guessing you dont need to know Unix, just be able to use new software to search and provide support!). I have a BA in English, so should I go for MLS or MLIS?? (academic librarianship is the goal here).

3. In terms of going for a masters, does this work out ideally: MLS first, then hopefully get a job at a good university, and then get another MA in field of choice (history, language, or something interdisciplinary). "choice" being field of academic librarianship I would like to specialize in OR go for a MA in "choice" and then pursue MLS??? Dont know which goes first.

4. What are the admissions office looking for in a candidate for a masters in library science? a good background in language? technical skills? what exactly should be "emphasized" on CVs?

5. In terms of experience, I have some cataloging private (and EXPENSIVE) libraries,...what exactly is ideal in terms of exp./internship?

6. Where can I find out more about the TYPES of librarians (seem to be many, even in academia) and what skills I can work toward and what SCHOOLS are best to attend? (I know Rutgers has a good program, and so does SJSU....and?)

thanks, I know I sound like a newbie (which I am to librarianship)......

cool.gifcool.gif

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MLIS programs tend to have more technology based courses. These classes are beyond just how to use a database and simple web design which are pretty standard across the board. MLIS programs tend to have things like interface design, metadata, digital library building and other more in depth tech based classes.

The technology component is really important. If you take a look at job ads, there's a heavy tech component in a lot of positions and there seems to be a bit more demand for tech oriented librarians. There's a growing demand for technology in libraries, so there need to be librarians to meet it. I also think that the tech skills are something that can help a new grad get a position over a more experienced candidate without the tech background.

I am trying to decide between an MLIS and MLS program in NYC as well.  The program at CUNY is much more affordable.  Is the difference in terms of employment prospects and preparation for the job worth the extra money?  I'm interested in working as a law librarian at a law library.  If anyone has any advice, I'd really appreciate it.

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