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On 2/17/2017 at 9:24 PM, nikkimx said:

I should add that I'm applying for housing in Laurel Village and Blakely Village. I much prefer Laurel Village. I can't imagine paying any more than $1000 for rent with my stipend and also needing to take care of my kids, so it's obviously an affordable option. But, is it safe?

 

Seattle is generally a pretty safe place. It has more property crime than most cities, but it has less violent crime. University District, the neighborhood around campus, has more crime than some areas, but Blakely Village and Laurel Village are away from the worst parts of UDistrict, so I'd imagine it's plenty safe. You can look at Seattle PD's data for a more complete picture here: https://www.seattle.gov/police/information-and-data/online-crime-maps

 

On 3/31/2017 at 2:15 PM, waderpanda said:

I've been doing the same.

I'm probably not going to move there till the semester actually begins but I was planning to go apartment hunting sometime in the summer. Is there a good time to do this? I know some places are pretty time sensitive in terms of finding an apartment. Anyone know when most apartments are listed as available?

I'm optimistically looking for a reasonably priced studio/one bedroom, but I'd be happy to share a place with one roommate. Also, does anyone have recommendations for neighborhoods closer to campus? I was originally looking onto Wallingford but I don't see any places listed as available currently.

Summer is a good time to find an apartment; summer is always a popular time to move in a city, and it's before most students are back. As you get closer to September, the rental market is a little more competitive, but it's still pretty easy to find a place to live in Seattle. You'll generally find a lot of apartments that are available at the beginning of June, July, August, and September, and a few that are available in the middle of the month. You can look at apartments now to see prices and what will generally be available when you're looking in the summer, but you shouldn't expect to see something now that will still be available in a few months. You can reasonably start looking at apartments two weeks--a month at the most--before you expect to move.

The poster above gave you a good list of neighborhoods. Just make sure you check google maps to see how long your commute will be. A transit pass is included in your tuition, so most people take the bus or ride a bike to get to campus. Parking on campus is insanely expensive, so don't plan to drive to campus unless you want to spend $1200 on parking over the year.

 

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7 hours ago, perpetuavix said:

Seattle is generally a pretty safe place. It has more property crime than most cities, but it has less violent crime. University District, the neighborhood around campus, has more crime than some areas, but Blakely Village and Laurel Village are away from the worst parts of UDistrict, so I'd imagine it's plenty safe. You can look at Seattle PD's data for a more complete picture here: https://www.seattle.gov/police/information-and-data/online-crime-maps

 

Thank you so much for the help!

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Thanks for the help @savay and @perpetuavix !

On 4/2/2017 at 5:09 PM, savay said:

I live in a university grad apartment because it made finding an apartment from far away easier and my commute is literally a 10 minute walk. A lot of fellow grads I know live in the U District, but other neighborhoods that are popular tend to be north of the cut (prevents you from having to cross bridges to get to campus, which can easily bottleneck during all hours of the day -- traffic is very bad in Seattle). So, I have friends that live in Ballard, Greenlake, Wallingford, Ravenna, etc. Some people also live further north near Maple Leaf/Wedgwood/Northgate -- there are some pretty direct bus lines to campus. Some other people I know live south, in East Lake and Capitol Hill -- they usually take Link to campus. 

I'm going to be moving from the east coast so I've been looking into the grad apartments just because I don't think I'll have time (in the midst of finishing up a thesis) to visit in the summer to look for a place. I was planning to head there for a few days in maybe July but now I'm thinking that it might be too much of a hassle. How has your experience been in grad housing? 

On 4/16/2017 at 6:23 PM, perpetuavix said:

 As you get closer to September, the rental market is a little more competitive, but it's still pretty easy to find a place to live in Seattle. You'll generally find a lot of apartments that are available at the beginning of June, July, August, and September, and a few that are available in the middle of the month. You can look at apartments now to see prices and what will generally be available when you're looking in the summer, but you shouldn't expect to see something now that will still be available in a few months. You can reasonably start looking at apartments two weeks--a month at the most--before you expect to move.

It sounds like I'll just have to wait to find a place because I'll be moving in the beginning of September. But this still gives me an idea of what to expect. Thanks again!

 

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On 4/24/2017 at 7:14 PM, waderpanda said:

I'm going to be moving from the east coast so I've been looking into the grad apartments just because I don't think I'll have time (in the midst of finishing up a thesis) to visit in the summer to look for a place. I was planning to head there for a few days in maybe July but now I'm thinking that it might be too much of a hassle. How has your experience been in grad housing?

My experience has been really positive. I'm living in a grad only apartment building that's managed by a contracting realtor and it's pretty calm. It's definitely not a dorm. The building managers are always around and helpful. And the price was on par with what I was finding elsewhere. There's enough bus routes nearby and only a short walk to the link so I can get around easily enough on public transit. There's a Trader Joe's and a Safeway in walking distance and a QFC (a local grocery chain that's a bit upscale, but not quite Whole Foods) not far away in a larger shopping center.

I think each of the grad buildings on campus have different ways of applying for places. I think some use the university's general housing application, but others you contact the building managers directly. I think it's about this time that they get ready to release leases for the next year so it's a good time to reach out if you're interested.

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Hi guys! 

 

I have an offer from UW, which is 30.5k. Do you know how much are the taxes? What should I expect?

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On 1/11/2018 at 8:20 AM, athan892 said:

Hi guys! 

 

I have an offer from UW, which is 30.5k. Do you know how much are the taxes? What should I expect?

Definitely interested in advice, or people who want to create a super academic flop house! 

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On 1/11/2018 at 6:20 AM, athan892 said:

Hi guys! 

 

I have an offer from UW, which is 30.5k. Do you know how much are the taxes? What should I expect?

Not sure what you mean about taxes. Do you mean employment taxes? Washington State doesn't have state income tax. Seattle's sales tax rate is close to 10%, though. 

Edited by maengret

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12 hours ago, maengret said:

Not sure what you mean about taxes. Do you mean employment taxes? Washington State doesn't have state income tax. Seattle's sales tax rate is close to 10%, though. 

I  mean, let's say that my stipend is 30.5k$ per year. How much will I receive? Is this the real amount that  I will receive? 

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@athan892 the stipend is most likely taxable income, like any other job. How much the school would withhold is in part determined by the IRS. Plus any fees, like if you have to pay a portion of your healthcare. The program should be able to give this information.

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@athan892 In a typical month of 2017, my paycheck at UW CSE was like this:

Graduate Student 50% Appointment: $ 2,749.00
Federal Income Tax withheld:      $   344.76
UAW Local 4121 union due          $    32.72
Workers' compensation insurance   $     8.78
Net income                        $ 2,362.74

Hope it helps!

A few things to keep in mind:

  • Your base pay will differ depending on your academic department. See this page for a complete list.
  • Your pay is subject to federal income tax (~12.5% effective rate for 30k) but exempt from Medicare and Social Security taxes.
  • The state of Washington is one of 9 states that do not levy any income tax. In its stead, you will be subject to a fairly high sales tax (10.2%) and annual vehicle registration tax ($120 + 1.1% of valuation).
  • UW is one of the few institutions where graduate students are unionized. Thus, you will be required to pay a union membership due (1.44% of pay). See UAW Local 4121.
  • UW will pay 100% of health insurance premium on your behalf. The insurance also includes dental and vision benefits. You may also enroll dependents for a fee.
  • You will be still be responsible for miscellaneous fees, including fees for athletic facilities and monthly bus pass (U-pass). This should run about 300 dollars each quarter.
Edited by hcho3

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Hello, does anyone have advice for international students moving to UW?

I am trying to get an idea of the kinds of neighborhoods where I can afford to live  (money- and distance/time-wise), and I was wondering how dependable the light rail is, and whether I can rent a place in maple leaf or downtown, without having to spend too much time commuting.

I'm also looking for roommates, but gradcafe seems to have a largely quiet UW community :) Does UW have its own discussion threads elsewhere? I'm not entirely confident about contacting strangers on roommate search sites -- although I have done so -- and it'd be way more reassuring to meet other grad students via grad forums than craigslist.

 

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On 4/21/2018 at 11:18 PM, Ishika said:

Hello, does anyone have advice for international students moving to UW?

I am trying to get an idea of the kinds of neighborhoods where I can afford to live  (money- and distance/time-wise), and I was wondering how dependable the light rail is, and whether I can rent a place in maple leaf or downtown, without having to spend too much time commuting.

I'm also looking for roommates, but gradcafe seems to have a largely quiet UW community :) Does UW have its own discussion threads elsewhere? I'm not entirely confident about contacting strangers on roommate search sites -- although I have done so -- and it'd be way more reassuring to meet other grad students via grad forums than craigslist.

 

Not going to UW for grad school, but was an undergrad there.

The light rails are dependable. Buses are dependable on the weekdays, but so-so on the weekends.  Depending on area, I'll choose a quieter neighbourhood as high density areas tend to be a little noisy, you get fire trucks blaring past your apartments early in the morning, or some homeless guy shouting in the middle of the night, etc, you get it. Dorms are the worst, fire trucks, random fire drills , fire-alarm-triggered-due-to-some-guy-cooking-popcorn-in-a-frying-pan are common things that will happen daily. I lived in U-District and it was alright, there was noise pollution but the convenience made up for it. If you're a heavy sleeper, ignore above.

Comparing Maple Leaf vs. Downtown, i think i will go for Maple Leaf. But my personal preference would be to share an apartment in U-District, as it is super accessible to everything on campus, from the IMA (sports facility) to classes. The Burke Gilman trail, something you will hear every now and then, also runs through campus, is a beautiful jogging and cycling trail. The restaurants by the campus also open till 9pm-12am so living close by is pretty nice.

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Thank you @dataseis! This is really helpful. I've found a bunch of places online, and this helps to narrow down my choices ?

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Was recently accepted to UW and offered a pretty good package.  I'm visiting Seattle in a few weeks to check out the school and the city.

Wondering how I go about housing?  Anyone have any advice about moving here (I'm from the Northeast--New England)?  Anything I should know?

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@The Wordsworthian I got accepted to UW as well! Congratulations! This may be a bit of the blind leading the blind as I am from the East Coast as well, but I spoke to a current student and someone in the admissions office and both said that UW students tend to use Craigslist for housing. 

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On 2/25/2019 at 7:11 AM, The Wordsworthian said:

Was recently accepted to UW and offered a pretty good package.  I'm visiting Seattle in a few weeks to check out the school and the city.

Wondering how I go about housing?  Anyone have any advice about moving here (I'm from the Northeast--New England)?  Anything I should know?

 

On 2/25/2019 at 11:40 AM, Amelia75 said:

@The Wordsworthian I got accepted to UW as well! Congratulations! This may be a bit of the blind leading the blind as I am from the East Coast as well, but I spoke to a current student and someone in the admissions office and both said that UW students tend to use Craigslist for housing. 

Not going to UW for grad school, but I've been living in Seattle for 6 years now and have had great luck using Craigslist (most people do).

 

If any of you guys have specific questions on living in different Seattle neighborhoods, prices, public transit, etc., feel free to DM me.

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Hi, is 28K a year enough to live in Seattle?

That's my stipend for a phD program. I wonder how much per month should i spend on housing with that budget 

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