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Hi Everyone. I haven't been able to find much on people applying to the phd program in public policy at Pardee RAND. I see from their site that the average GRE scores for admitted students are mid-600s for verbal and mid-700s for math, but does anyone have any other data on admitted students (like typical work/research experience, number of people with advanced degrees,etc)?

Also, is anyone familiar with the program or the research coming out of RAND? What is it known for (besides being quantitative in nature) and what is it not good at? What is the student satisfaction with the program? Any info/perspectives would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.

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Hi Everyone. I haven't been able to find much on people applying to the phd program in public policy at Pardee RAND. I see from their site that the average GRE scores for admitted students are mid-600s for verbal and mid-700s for math, but does anyone have any other data on admitted students (like typical work/research experience, number of people with advanced degrees,etc)?

Also, is anyone familiar with the program or the research coming out of RAND? What is it known for (besides being quantitative in nature) and what is it not good at? What is the student satisfaction with the program? Any info/perspectives would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.

I can help you. I applied last year but was denied.

PRGS is very selective. I would say that most of admitted fellows are referral cases. PRGS usually recruit from schools that have private connection with it and take recons from its familiar professors. At least that is how it works here in China. One of my upperclassman got in because PRGS signed an contract with our college to give referred students interview opportunities.

As far as I know, PRGS is more like a consulting firm. Fellows actually work on projects and publish reports, and get paid!

You can look at their websites - fellows name list - profile, try to find anyone who has any kind of connection with you and contact them via email. That actually works.

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  • 2 months later...

Most students leave with A LOT of debt. They don't have enough projects to fund students on (plus with economy going down), so you simply can't meet the quota to get your small stipend anyway. You'll owe them for tuition and stipend. Try taking a public service job with that debt. If I were applying, I'd consider MBAs as comparable...the end jobs are the same as you wouldn't publish in journals (just reports) either route.

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A buddy of mine is doing the PhD program on an Air Force scholarship there. Came in highly ranked out of the AF Academy (no work experience). Can put you in touch with him if you'd like.

In my mind at least (political economy major undergrad, military), RAND puts out very quality stuff in a wide range of areas.

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Most students leave with A LOT of debt. They don't have enough projects to fund students on (plus with economy going down), so you simply can't meet the quota to get your small stipend anyway. You'll owe them for tuition and stipend. Try taking a public service job with that debt. If I were applying, I'd consider MBAs as comparable...the end jobs are the same as you wouldn't publish in journals (just reports) either route.

A few questions:

1. How much debt are we talking about?

2. What's your source for the claim about there not being enough projects?

3. What do you mean by MBAs are comparable? MBA and Ph.D. programs (RAND's included) are two very different types of training. The "end jobs" are not the same. How many MBAs become senior level researchers? How many policy Ph.D.'s become CEOs, COOs, etc?

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  • 2 years later...

Hi everybody!

 

I am currently a second year PRGS student and I can give you my perspective on your questions. 

 

1) As of right now I have no debt. The program requires that you work a certain number of hours in order to maintain your fellowship. It is very similar to a TAship, but instead of teaching you work on projects. 

2) Finding projects depends completely on each fellow and their interests. I think it is possible for someone not to have any projects, but it would have to be a person that is not open to working on issues that are on the periphery of their interests. 

3) I agree. The employment market is different for a PhD and an MBA. One thing I can tell you is that the majority of graduates opt not to follow an academic track (around 75%)

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  • 3 months later...

Policy PhD,

 

I will be retiring from the military in about 2 years and am interested in information in PRGS.  I hope you don't mind if I ask a few questions:

 

1)  Do any of the PhD graduates stay at Rand as full time staff members?

2)  If 75% of the grads are not following an academic track, where are they going to work?

3)  Are there many opportunities to work on projects in defense, security or international relations?

 

Thanks.

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