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The sub-3.0 GPAs ACCEPTANCE thread

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So for those of you who were accepted, did you just get a regular acceptance, or were there terms that you had to maintain a certain GPA, have several meetings with advisors each semester about your progress/grades, etc.?

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On 3/8/2016 at 9:48 PM, calico said:

So for those of you who were accepted, did you just get a regular acceptance, or were there terms that you had to maintain a certain GPA, have several meetings with advisors each semester about your progress/grades, etc.?

I had to maintain a 3.0 my first year to continue. 

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Like everyone else on this thread I have a low GPA (2.946 to be exact), this was due to several factors, the primary ones being that I tended to overload my course schedule and work too many hours (30-40 depending on the semester). While I do regret overloading my course schedule I don't regret working so much since I was working in research laboratories in my field and that experience allowed me to get a job in research after graduating back in 2010. I've now applied to graduate school since I'm finding my ability to move into the positions I want to be limited by the fact that I don't have a graduate degree. I'm hoping that the combination of my academic research experience, industry research experience and good letter of recommendation will help overcome my low GPA and my ok GRE scores (V 155 (67%) Q 153 (52%) W 3.5 (38%)). 

Any thoughts? I am still waiting on all five schools I have applied to.

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8 hours ago, F.graminearum said:

Like everyone else on this thread I have a low GPA (2.946 to be exact), this was due to several factors, the primary ones being that I tended to overload my course schedule and work too many hours (30-40 depending on the semester).

...

Any thoughts? I am still waiting on all five schools I have applied to.

Here is my suggestion. If you get in but without funding during this cycle, or, if you the worst case happens and you don't get in this cycle, apply to a postbacc. The thing is, you will want to show, through your next work, either undfunded or a postbacc, that you are no longer engaging in the behavior that led to less than successful outcomes in the past. You can get beyond one less than stellar part of your portfolio. Meanwhile, too, ramp up your CV. 

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On 3/8/2016 at 6:48 PM, calico said:

So for those of you who were accepted, did you just get a regular acceptance, or were there terms that you had to maintain a certain GPA, have several meetings with advisors each semester about your progress/grades, etc.?

I got into Master's degree program for Museum Studies through the University of Oklahoma Outreach program (online.) They didn't require letters of recommendation or the GRE for their program; I got in on my strong CV and personal statement even though my GPA was a 2.69. I have to maintain a minimum of a 3.0 for my first 12 credits to continue as a graduate in good standing without being dismissed.

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Just came to post the happy news that I was accepted to my first choice masters program with a 2.93 GPA (and mediocre GRE - 80th percentie Verbal, 50th percentile Q, 5 AW)!!  I worked in my field for the last two years, improved my experiences, and connected with my soon-to-be-advisor while working with her on a project.  This and working hard to show  I am dedicated means I get a shot to prove that I am more than my lazy undergraduate work.  As yet, funding will be QUTE slim, however, I think once I finish this degree, get a publication and keep growing I'll be on track to earn a funded phd. 

 

Anyway! That's my bright news! It CAN happen!   :)

Slave on, fellow sub-3.0ers.  

 

11 hours ago, charlemagne88 said:

this may make me a bad person, but I came to this thread to feel better about myself and my chances to get into grad school. lol 

sorry

 Totally does seem pretty bad when you took the time to make that comment, but I know what you mean -- the process is so difficult to gauge no matter your GPA.  I hope you get into your top choice! 

Edited by lightballsdeep
more info

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Just accepted an offer for a Ph.D position for biology with full funding for 5 years couple weeks ago, the school was my top choice and i never would have applied if the professor that i reached out to didn't encourage me to apply. My gpa at the time of application was 2.95 and i brought it up to 3.05 by the time they were looking at my applications, I am 100 percent sure grade was not a factor at the time so please do not freak out like i did. I'm finishing my undergrad at a mid-sized SUNY school, i think the most important factors that got me in was my research experience (3 years) and the letter of recommendations, one of which was from my research adviser since my freshman year and we'll be co-authors on a manuscript.

When i was looking at grad schools I was really paranoid because my grades sucked, my GRE's sucked (Verbal and Writing was below 50th percentile) and i barely had any luck connecting with PI's. I mostly applied to masters' programs since i thought i had a better chance to get in, then work towards my Ph.D. I applied to 2 Ph.D schools and got rejected from one, the Ph.D program that i got accepted to is literally 15 minute drive from my parent's house. It was my top choice by far. 

Seriously though, get some experience in and apply to wherever you think you'll enjoy the next 5 years of your life in every aspect. The worst thing that can happen is you wasting around 100 bucks and a rejection letter from someone you're never going to meet.

Edited by that1asian21

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Anything is possible. 

2.54 in undergrad. First generation college student.

Went immediately into a master's program. Got straight A's.

Spent a few years in the field.

Now thriving in the PhD program of my dreams. 

I remember reading this thread the FIRST time I applied to doctoral programs and did not get in anywhere. Second round I finally got in.

Trust. Everything happens for a reason. We stew over gpas, scores, and compare unique experiences insisting that we have some degree of control over the outcome of the admissions process--when in reality we probably have a lot less control than we'd like to admit. Where you are meant to be is where you are meant to be...

That said:

If you want to make a difference, go and BE THE CHANGE.

If you wanna reach for stars, fly out there and BE ONE.

If you have a calling, you better pick up that phone!!!

 

 

Edited by put a bird on it
Emphaseses

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I write my story here today because I was inspired by this forum several month ago.

My undergraduate GPA 2.93/4, master GPA 3.15/4.  very nasty GPA.

One year ago, I had several sleepless night after knowing GPA 3.0 is cutoff value for PhD. But I never give up. I wrote more than 500 emailst to professors of physics department and electrical engineering department of all possible/impossible university.  I made good preparation for those give me interviews or just ask a few questions to me.  My heart to become a phycist outweigh anything in my life. I will not let low GPA stop my path to my dream, even if I am a lady at the age of 30 and a  low GPA. 

It turn out that I was encouraged to apply by lots of university, because of my great academic background( one first-author publication in APL, two second-author publication in APL and RSC).

I wrote a personal history for Professor of interest, stating my determination and my past life, like why I want to continue my academic career, even I already got a job as software engineer. I spend lots of time to prepare SOP, digging out the past present and future of my POI's research by reading lots of paper. 

Now I already got two admission, university of Georgia, fellowship + RA, North Carolina State University , RA, both are electrical engineering. (Cornell and Michigan Ann Arbor Applied Physics put me in the waiting list but reject me). UC riverside and Colorado Boulder still waiting. But I already accept NCSU.  The reality is even more beautiful than my wildest dream.

I want to give a chinese old-saying to encourage everybody here. Sub-3.0 GPA still got PhD admission is like phoenix reborn in a fire.  If you are brave enough, nothing can stop you. What you need to do, is to truly believe in yourself.

I am internationshal student, female, sub-3.0 GPA, nothing is on my advantage. But I show my POI and the committee the unparallel persistance and passion, which are greatest advantages of being real researcher.

 

 

 

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Hello everyone,

As you may have read, I had a horrible undergrad experience and had many personal problems. If you have not read my previous posts that I think I posted back in the summer or sometime last fall semester, then I'll talk again about my horrible GPA, GRE scores, and why I am in this position and why I got rejected from every grad school I applied to, even one school that was mediocre and not accredited rejected me and accepted everyone else:

 

Applying Now Undergrad GPA: 2.96 overall

Jr/Sr GPA: 3.00

Major GPA: 2.40 (I have no idea if they even calculated that, but it's not on my official transcript) 

GRE: 138V/143Q/3.5AW

Work Experience: One semester working at a school and currently working at the same school until June. I have volunteered in a lot of community services working with children.

Personal Statement: I have no idea if this was one of the issues why all the 6 schools I applied to rejected me. I mentioned how I want to work with children and adolescents and talked very little about working with adults and I said that I wanted to go to the University because the program would reach my goals. I never really explained why, and I wrote a lot of scenario examples about how I would help children reach their goals and stuff. But I revamped my entire personal statement and made it sound more professional. I did not mention my GPA and the problems I had in my statement. I never brought that up and the same goes with the GRE scores.

Leadership Positions: I am in Psi Chi as an Officer currently. 

 

I will say this. 3 schools weeded me out entirely and 3 schools read my application but still rejected me. All of my friends got accepted and are all making plans to move and stuff. I only got rejected. I am also shocked that they never even at least gave me a chance for conditional admissions. I told one of my close friends who I trust about this and she told me that it's more than likely my GPA. She also said that I applied to all traditional competitive schools too that only take top students, which is somewhat true. I decided from now on, no more competitive schools. I'm going to apply to schools that are not named Universities and that have the program housed in a building. Traditional Universities are hard to get into. 

 

I have 10 more schools left, most of which are not competitive, one has appeals policy where I explain myself in front of a committee. Should I explain my GPA and GRE scores in my personal statement? Many people told me not to, but I do not know if I should. What do I do? I want to get my life started. It's depressing how I'm the only one who did not get accepted. Would I have a chance at a tiny school housed in a small building? 

 

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I'm happy to be able to add a story to this list. I had multiple false starts at a very highly ranked undergraduate school. I wasn't going to class, wasn't doing homework, wasn't engaged at all. I took a year off, came back, was recommended to take some time off. Tried to come back, again had to leave. My overall GPA was 2.0. After officially flunking out I worked for a couple years and somehow managed to get them to readmit me. Upon return I had a 3.5 GPA the rest of the way - an improvement but it was far from perfect, with a couple B-'s. My overall GPA netted out to a 2.5 and I graduated four years late.

Once I decided to try for a master's degree I spent nearly a year putting together my application.

- Most important, I have spent six years in industry at a unique, interesting job that was relevant to the kinds of programs I was applying to, working in a relatively senior role.

- My SOP told an understandable and likely unique story about what I planned to learn and what I wanted to do with that knowledge.

- I didn't dwell on past failures but included a separate paragraph in the SOP addressing them forthrightly.

- I got a really great GRE score.

- I took two night classes relevant to my field and got an A in both.

- My LORs were strong and spoke to my ability from different perspectives - my boss, a client, and a professor at a reputable university (from the night class).

In the end, I thought my application was pretty strong and only applied only to top programs. I was rejected from some that I expected to get into, for reasons that are unknowable. But I got into my top two choices, one of which had a 3% acceptance rate for the program I applied to.

I was fortunate to have very high test scores and a degree from name brand undergraduate institution, even if my record there was abysmal. But everything else - work experience, SOP, LORs, and additional academic experience - came from a lot of hard work.

If you had told me I'd be going to this school 10 years ago I'd have said you were crazy. But I'll be there in the fall :)

Edited by DC1020

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On March 11, 2016 at 6:30 AM, Agrippina said:

Here is my suggestion. If you get in but without funding during this cycle, or, if you the worst case happens and you don't get in this cycle, apply to a postbacc. The thing is, you will want to show, through your next work, either undfunded or a postbacc, that you are no longer engaging in the behavior that led to less than successful outcomes in the past. You can get beyond one less than stellar part of your portfolio. Meanwhile, too, ramp up your CV. 

I'm not sure how, I can ramp up my cv more than working in research in my field as I have for the past 5 years. I have my name on several pending patents, but because of being in industry my ability to publish (or even try) is severely hampered by lawyers. Also, my field (plant pathology) doesn't offer graduate positions without funding. So the only option would be to look into online MS degrees, which are not well thought of by most of the people in the field. 

Also I'm still waiting to hear from everywhere I've applied. I've reached out to the schools and have been told by several that they have not made decisions yet.

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Just want to share, and possibly get some support!

My undergrad GPA was abysmal.  There are reasons for this, but unfortunately there is no "Put your excuses for your second and third year here" box on applications.  After I graduated from my undergrad, I tried figuring out my GPA (my school doesn't use a 4.0 system) and I figured I had landed solidly in the 2.2ish range, with a 3.2 in my last two years, with the entire last year spent on the honour list.  My undergrad also included a forced withdrawal for academic performance, and two changes of majors.  The most mixed of records.

I applied to a masters program with the professor who worked with me on my undergraduate capstone and managed to get in.  I did great in the program, pulling a 4.0 masters GPA, have upcoming publications, and a thesis with some interesting research using an emerging technology. 

Right now I'm applying to PhD programs, and have actually had interest.  None of them know my story.  One professor talked to me over skype, and didn't comment on my undergrad performance, and I never mentioned it.  I had some big research projects, a couple of publications, good GRE Quant scores for my field, stellar GRE AW and Verbal scores for my field.  I had to apply late so I only applied to a couple of programs, specifically ones which have a policy that the minimum Undergrad GPA is superseded by a Graduate GPA.

My dream was always to get a PhD, but I gave up at some point.  In the last four years I managed to claw my way back to being a half-decent candidate.  If I don't get in, I'll try again, but I'm optimistic about one in particular, my #1 choice, in fact.   I get the impression I'll be hearing back early next week.  The prof that contacted me didn't say anything specific, but I'm optimistic, Computer Science interviews like that aren't common from what I can glean.

 

Short form:  Don't give up hope, pick the right projects, take a few more classes and get A's.  Try long enough and SOMEONE will recognize your ability, and scoop you up.

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46 minutes ago, Happington said:

Just want to share, and possibly get some support!

My undergrad GPA was abysmal.  There are reasons for this, but unfortunately there is no "Put your excuses for your second and third year here" box on applications.  After I graduated from my undergrad, I tried figuring out my GPA (my school doesn't use a 4.0 system) and I figured I had landed solidly in the 2.2ish range, with a 3.2 in my last two years, with the entire last year spent on the honour list.  My undergrad also included a forced withdrawal for academic performance, and two changes of majors.  The most mixed of records.

I applied to a masters program with the professor who worked with me on my undergraduate capstone and managed to get in.  I did great in the program, pulling a 4.0 masters GPA, have upcoming publications, and a thesis with some interesting research using an emerging technology. 

Right now I'm applying to PhD programs, and have actually had interest.  None of them know my story.  One professor talked to me over skype, and didn't comment on my undergrad performance, and I never mentioned it.  I had some big research projects, a couple of publications, good GRE Quant scores for my field, stellar GRE AW and Verbal scores for my field.  I had to apply late so I only applied to a couple of programs, specifically ones which have a policy that the minimum Undergrad GPA is superseded by a Graduate GPA.

My dream was always to get a PhD, but I gave up at some point.  In the last four years I managed to claw my way back to being a half-decent candidate.  If I don't get in, I'll try again, but I'm optimistic about one in particular, my #1 choice, in fact.   I get the impression I'll be hearing back early next week.  The prof that contacted me didn't say anything specific, but I'm optimistic, Computer Science interviews like that aren't common from what I can glean.

 

Short form:  Don't give up hope, pick the right projects, take a few more classes and get A's.  Try long enough and SOMEONE will recognize your ability, and scoop you up.

Wow, 2.2 is pretty bad. It seems like your research experience and GRE scores really made up for that undergrad GPA. After reading your post, now I'm starting to realize that there might be hope. Maybe I just applied to all the desirable and most competitive schools in the United States that have huge football teams. As I said, I am applying to some mediocre schools in the summer and some Universities that will be less competitive. But if all fails, my plan is to move out of where I live and to work and take online undergrad Psychology Courses to raise my GPA while I'm working. I was told that I can get into my University's graduate school because the university I go to is horrible and one of the low ranked schools in the nation, but the work is super hard. The city is awful too, everybody who lives there hates it. That is one of the reasons why I really want to move. I was hoping it would be for grad school, but most likely, it's gonna be for work. I also will retake the GRE if I have to reapply, but this time, I'm gonna enroll myself in a prep course. My city never had one because it sucks. I hope if I have to move for work, I will get to live in a big metropolis city. Unfortunately, grad schools in metropolis cities are so competitive and want students with a 3.8 GPA. 

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My story has a similar start to Happington's. I had a pretty bad two years at community college for medical reasons, but met the bare minimum requirements to transfer to a four-year school. Once I got to that university, my grades steadily improved .. but I was still at a 2.8, because they counted everything equally despite graduating with honors for my BA. I had multiple schools reject me for that outright without seemingly even taking the time to read my SOP (they were VERY fast rejections).

But I interview well, my GRE was ... well, V164, Q147, AW6. Which is two near-perfect scores and ... a 28% on the quantitative. That doesn't look too fantastic either; I got lucky in that I had As in relevant statistics courses and a statistics professor writing a LOR. I'm not going to say those two high GREs didn't help, though, I definitely think they did.

What also helped: Research experience. Work experience (I'm doing MPH, and have 3 years as an EMT plus a medical coding certification). Strong SOP. 

I was given a regular matriculated acceptance, not conditional -- but everyone at the school is expected to maintain a minimum of 3.0 once you're in, so I'm not sure they even do conditional acceptances.

I'm not going to an Ivy or anything, just a public school, and just for a Masters. I was also accepted to GWU, but opted not to attend because I'm not in a financial place to handle private school or moving. Honestly, I'm perfectly fine with that -- even six months ago, if you told me I'd be posting in the sub 3.0 acceptance thread telling other people what things helped me get there I'd be totally shocked. I didn't expect to get in my first round of applications.   

For the record, Jo, I'm in NYC. It's not all about GPA, really. I thought it was too. But it's not to every school.

Edited by Spessartine
dumb typo!

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I'm doing a double major in Microbiology and Genetics and I have a 2.3 GPA. Even though my GPA is so low I want to go to grad school for Developmental & Reproductive Biology. I have had a lot of experience in research since I had multiple internships and jobs working at the veterinary school, zoos, genetics laboratories, etc. In addition, in all my laboratory courses I have passed with A's but in other courses like chemistry and math I have done poorly. I was wondering what are my real chances into getting into a school program even if I get a real high school in my GRE and have good recommendation letters. And if so, which schools do you recommend (similar programs).

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hi everyone,

undergraduate gpa (sociology): 2.79

master's gpa (eurasian studies): 3.69

I studied in Turkey, and wish to do a phd (either in sociology or political science) in the europe or canada (since the u.s. seems impossible). do you think I have any chance?

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On 4/5/2016 at 5:29 PM, vmortega said:

I'm doing a double major in Microbiology and Genetics and I have a 2.3 GPA. Even though my GPA is so low I want to go to grad school for Developmental & Reproductive Biology. I have had a lot of experience in research since I had multiple internships and jobs working at the veterinary school, zoos, genetics laboratories, etc. In addition, in all my laboratory courses I have passed with A's but in other courses like chemistry and math I have done poorly. I was wondering what are my real chances into getting into a school program even if I get a real high school in my GRE and have good recommendation letters. And if so, which schools do you recommend (similar programs).

 

You probably don't stand a chance of getting in, anywhere with those grades in core courses, regardless of other redeeming qualities. Even if the department wants you, the graduate college may outright reject you due to low grades. A 2.3 is utterly dismal. 

I had a 2.75 GPA, 166V,168Q 5.0W GRE scores and I've got a first author paper in PNAS.

I got instantly rejected from many programs just based on grades.

I did manage to get into some great programs though.  

 

 

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On 4/5/2016 at 5:29 PM, vmortega said:

I'm doing a double major in Microbiology and Genetics and I have a 2.3 GPA. Even though my GPA is so low I want to go to grad school for Developmental & Reproductive Biology. I have had a lot of experience in research since I had multiple internships and jobs working at the veterinary school, zoos, genetics laboratories, etc. In addition, in all my laboratory courses I have passed with A's but in other courses like chemistry and math I have done poorly. I was wondering what are my real chances into getting into a school program even if I get a real high school in my GRE and have good recommendation letters. And if so, which schools do you recommend (similar programs).

I would consider doing another Bachelors or a Post Bac. Anything below a 2.5 overall, you will not even be considered at any school. Above a 2.5, you might get into a mediocre school housed in a building. But to get into grad school now and days requires a minimum of 3.5 overall, final 60 hours, and major GPA. My situation is similar to yours. I have a 2.96 GPA but a low GPA of 3.0 last 60 hours and a 2.4 major GPA. They do calculate major GPA, even if it's not listed on your transcript. Sounds crazy that they take time and use a ruler and look at each course. For me, I probably have no hope at all in ever going to grad school for another 2-3 years. I'll probably end up doing another Bachelors at my home school while my brother will go to grad school before me and he is way younger. GRE scores too are a huge factor. I'm gonna spend a year studying for the GRE, 2 hours a day and then I'm gonna retake it. Some schools will instantly weed out by GRE scores. But GPA is a huge factor. When older people tell you, "graduate school is not hard to get into", they are wrong because they went to graduate school in the 60s and 70s. Things have changed a lot. Also, you will need 90th percentile GRE scores too. 

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On 2015/11/27 at 3:11 AM, Samoyed said:

I'm applying to IU's HCI/d program and IUPUI's HCI program for Fall 2016. My GPA was a 2.79 in history and I'm taking my GRE tomorrow. I've averaged out my practice tests and I'm looking at ~162 for V and ~154 for Q. V is higher than other accepted students from the results index, but Q is a bit lower. History majors generally have strong essay scores, but we'll see.

I am currently taking three HCI classes (so full-time) through IUPUI as a non-degree student. I currently have an A- and two As in the classes. It seems like I should get into IUPUI at least; the class I have an A- in currently has several accepted students failing it. I'm also working 45 hours a week, which apparently means I am some sort of insanely dedicated student doing the impossible. All current grad students have told me that working full time and going to grad school full time is impossible.

I'm asking those three professors to write my letters of recommendation. I'm using my work from those classes in my portfolio. Additionally, I met with some professors on the admissions committee from the program at IU and IUPUI; I visited IU twice. I went to a general open house and I went to a campus visit I requested. For both programs, I know exactly what they want on the SoP. Both programs told me to address my GPA in a separate, brief essay if I don't want to address it in my SoP. I'm trying to figure out how to write about it.

Hopefully, I will get into either of the programs. I researched how to get into grad school with a sub-3.0 GPA, and the aforementioned things were the most highly suggested courses of action.

 

I also applied for MS HCI at IUPUI, but I have not heard from them yet. Have you got decision from the program? 

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I can share a success story here!

Came into undergrad (physics major) and absolutely bombed my second year. Battling with depression, the first semester of my Sophomore year saw me getting an F, three Cs and a B. Cratered my cumulative GPA down to a 2.4. (Oof.) Went and sought help at a counseling center and became very close with one of the physics professors - one whom I'd never had as a lecturer but who was known to be very open to undergrads. His help got me back and motivated and put me on the right track. I busted tail my last two years here in undergrad. It wasn't easy, especially at first. Because of my terrible performance up to that point, I didn't have the background knowledge necessary for the upper level courses, so the climb was a difficult one. But starting with the second half of my third year, I started seeing the results. Managed to get up to a 2.8 cumulative with a 3.3 major GPA. Most importantly, I found an INCREDIBLE undergrad research position doing LIGO data analysis, which I've worked in for two years now.

 

Two days ago I got word from my top choice school that I was accepted directly into the Ph.D program with full funding. I cried when I got the letter. Don't give up folks! People notice when you work as hard as you can and are passionate about what you do.

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On 2016/4/11 at 11:23 AM, Formosus said:

I can share a success story here!

Came into undergrad (physics major) and absolutely bombed my second year. Battling with depression, the first semester of my Sophomore year saw me getting an F, three Cs and a B. Cratered my cumulative GPA down to a 2.4. (Oof.) Went and sought help at a counseling center and became very close with one of the physics professors - one whom I'd never had as a lecturer but who was known to be very open to undergrads. His help got me back and motivated and put me on the right track. I busted tail my last two years here in undergrad. It wasn't easy, especially at first. Because of my terrible performance up to that point, I didn't have the background knowledge necessary for the upper level courses, so the climb was a difficult one. But starting with the second half of my third year, I started seeing the results. Managed to get up to a 2.8 cumulative with a 3.3 major GPA. Most importantly, I found an INCREDIBLE undergrad research position doing LIGO data analysis, which I've worked in for two years now.

 

Two days ago I got word from my top choice school that I was accepted directly into the Ph.D program with full funding. I cried when I got the letter. Don't give up folks! People notice when you work as hard as you can and are passionate about what you do.

Nice 

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On 4/2/2016 at 9:20 AM, Jo said:

Hello everyone,

As you may have read, I had a horrible undergrad experience and had many personal problems. If you have not read my previous posts that I think I posted back in the summer or sometime last fall semester, then I'll talk again about my horrible GPA, GRE scores, and why I am in this position and why I got rejected from every grad school I applied to, even one school that was mediocre and not accredited rejected me and accepted everyone else:

 

Applying Now Undergrad GPA: 2.96 overall

Jr/Sr GPA: 3.00

Major GPA: 2.40 (I have no idea if they even calculated that, but it's not on my official transcript) 

GRE: 138V/143Q/3.5AW

Work Experience: One semester working at a school and currently working at the same school until June. I have volunteered in a lot of community services working with children.

I have 10 more schools left, most of which are not competitive, one has appeals policy where I explain myself in front of a committee. Should I explain my GPA and GRE scores in my personal statement? Many people told me not to, but I do not know if I should. What do I do? I want to get my life started. It's depressing how I'm the only one who did not get accepted. Would I have a chance at a tiny school housed in a small building? 

I know its piss awful to feel left behind, but I think the better option would to completely invest yourself working for 2 years even if its interning w/o pay in the field that your program is training you for, to then reapply again for decent schools. It is huge compromise if you choose this over an acceptance from a "noncompetitive" school. But unless you're shooting for a PhD and masters is only to give you a bump, to have a competent school even if not the best as the distributor for your working degree is far better than to go with anyone willing to take you. Most graduates no matter the school, will struggle to find employment initially from lack of to no experience, you who have some extent of working industry experience in the 2 years off, will already have leads and foot in the door and  advantage in that latency period, in addition to coming from a competent program. No choice is wrong b/c it is your choice and what is life if you dont make it yours, just my two cents.

 

Edited by DarkCharisma

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