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The sub-3.0 GPAs ACCEPTANCE thread


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Hey everybody, I created my account here on the grad cafe to share my story about being accepted into a fully funded PhD program and assistantship. Hopefully this story will make the sub 3.0'ers more optimistic about their grad school prospects.

 

A little background, I graduated 2 years ago with a BS in chemical engineering. This summer I applied to 15 different grad programs total, all within Ohio, that were a mix of MS and PhD programs, in both the chemistry and chemical engineering. The reason I applied to so many and spent a total of about $400 in the whole application process was to compensate for my qualifications, or lack thereof:

 

-2.72 undergrad cumulative GPA (GPA for engineering specific coursework was even lower)

-average GRE scores (151 quantitative, 159 verbal, 4.5 essay)

-no master's degree

-only 2 years of spotty industry experience (2 internships that lasted between 3-4 months, longest job I worked was the current one I had started working at this past february)

-applied way late after the application deadline, during this past summer for this upcoming fall term, because I just wanted to see if I could get into any grad program and get schooling out the way for the rest of my life. Wasn't expecting anything funded at all.

 

Anyway, I just found out last week that I was accepted into one of the PhD programs I applied to in chemistry, in a large university in central Ohio, with a 19k/yr assistantship that I dont even remember applying for. Obviously I took up the offer and now Im moving down to their campus this week to attend orientations and stuff.

 

So yea, even though some of you guys may have low GPA's and still have grad school in mind, just bear in mind that crazy strokes of luck happen and I would highly recommend using the shotgun method (applying to as many programs as possible) to see what comes out of it.

 

You_win_the_prize.jpg

 

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this thread is discriminatory against people with sub-2.0 gpas!!

I feel like I need to make a thread for 4.0 undergrads with no acceptances to balance things. (charter member)

You all make me laugh. I took the time to register this account, because I thought that I was looking at a thread of disasters. In-fact, almost all of you have decent GPA's. I dont think I saw anyone

I posted a while back about my adventures in applying to a mix of PhD programs and Master's. For some review, I was a serial major changer (I changed majors 13 times over 10 years, and I attended 4 different schools). I graduated with a 3.59 GPA from my undergrad school, but when you put all of my undergrad work together, my GPA is something like a 2.7. While at the time I was kind of bummed out, I was rejected from all of the PhD programs I applied to without so much as an interview. My LORs were great, I think my statements were pretty good, and my GREs aren't too shabby (160 verbal, 155 math, 4.5 writing). However, I was accepted to both of the Master's programs I applied to, and I already have the perfect thesis project lined up and funded at Bloomsburg University where I will be attending. Honestly, the project is a dream come true for an aspiring ornithologist and I get to travel abroad I am actually glad that I didn't get into a PhD program, because none of the potential research could hold a candle to this. Sure, there's no $25k stipend that I dream of getting, but since Bloomsburg is a state school, the tuition is cheap and it's close enough that I can still live in my parents' basement, though it may not be too glamorous.

 

Some other positive notes. Since sending in all my apps, I have gained a lot more research experience, got several awards for my undergrad research, got an outstanding graduate award from my department, and am in the process of submitting my research for publication. Hopefully, by the time I apply to a PhD program again, I will have multiple publications which will no doubt help my app, plus I will have more research experience. My only concern will be getting really good LORs. I will no doubt get a strong one from my thesis advisor (assuming I don't suck), but I will not have as much time to work with and get to know professors as I did as an undergrad.

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  • 2 months later...

I think this post is great for motivation/inspiration! I am a Public Health major who  struggled for various reasons in undergraduate, ended up taking a 3 year break after having been enrolled for 4 years. After returning to school, it took me 1 year (2 summer semesters, fall and spring) to complete my degree. I ended my college career earning a GPA of 3.5 for fall and spring and a 4.0 for the 2 summer semesters. My major GPA was always above a 3.0 regardless of other difficulties I had in school and I was accepted into Eta Sigma Gamma, the national health education honorary. Still, my cumulative GPA was only a 2.65. I took the GRE's and placed in the 91% for verbal, earning a 161..I didn't do too well in math earning a 147. My combined GRE score of 310 left me in a relatively competitive range for MPH applicants. I applied for the Spring 2014 MPH programs at the University of Southern California, George Washington University and the University of Alabama. With great recommendations and a strong personal statement, I have earned admissions to USC and GWU, still waiting to hear back from UAB but 2/3 wouldn't be bad! I think taking a break and performing strong upon my return demonstrated a growth, maturity and ability to work well at a graduate level. My GRE scores and recommendations helped as well. Don't be too discouraged, there are a lot of paths to graduate education!

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Jumping in to say I am really happy to see this thread (as are many people it seems). I have a 2.78 uGPA (mostly due to trouble in chemistry courses) and a 3.47 gGPA (Masters) with two more semesters left of grades to combine into it. I do have many, MANY years of research, study abroad, work, and internship experience. Hopefully it all pays off. I also have references from world-famous scientists. 

 

The best part is - many PoIs are interested in me at the universities I am applying for. The trouble is just making it through the application process to get to them. 

 

Does anyone know how much weight it carries to have multiple faculty vouching for you?

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I have a 2.6 and a low GRE (149, 143, 2.5). I really need the confidence, I'm also trying to go straight to a PhD. I got my undergrad a year ago from December. A master's degree seems like a waste of debt to me and my boss agrees with me. But I'm having a hard time deciding if I should wait another year or should I just go for it. Will the application process just be a waste of time for the time being? 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just got another rejection. This one was from the program that I thought was the most open to my learning disability. I'm only good at a very narrow range of things which is something that's supposed to be ok for PhD programs. I'm beginning to think that I have Asberger's as well so I'm giving up PhD applications and saving my pennies to get tested. It's not like that would help me get admitted, I just need to know.

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I applied for MCB/ Infectious Disease programs at 3 schools this year. I have a 2.9 GPA, 89%V/94%Q (not sure what it is on the new scale) GRE scores, 2.5 years of solid industry experience. Unfortunately, this industry experience is in a specialization I'm not interested in pursuing. I'm not too sure about my recs, but I think they might be ok. I'm starting to feel like 3 schools isn't enough. :(

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You need to be careful with conditional acceptances. Ask the school what the terms and conditions are. Sometimes a conditional admit will hinder your ability to get financial aid (loans, grant money, scholarships) or continue your studies at the school if you fall below a certain GPA or grade.

 

Ie: USC Rossier admitted me with a conditional admit. Their terms stated that a grade level of B was required for all classes the first semester. If a B was not met I would not be able to continue studies.

 

In my MFA program everyone had to maintain a B average for candidacy and financial aid, regardless of any previous standing. that's just how it was. Honestly, if you can't maintain a B average in Grad School, you might not be going for the right reasons.

 

This summer I applied to 15 different grad programs total, all within Ohio, that were a mix of MS and PhD programs, in both the chemistry and chemical engineering. The reason I applied to so many and spent a total of about $400 in the whole application process was to compensate for my qualifications, or lack thereof:

 

-2.72 undergrad cumulative GPA (GPA for engineering specific coursework was even lower)

-average GRE scores (151 quantitative, 159 verbal, 4.5 essay)

-no master's degree

-only 2 years of spotty industry experience (2 internships that lasted between 3-4 months, longest job I worked was the current one I had started working at this past february)

-applied way late after the application deadline, during this past summer for this upcoming fall term, because I just wanted to see if I could get into any grad program and get schooling out the way for the rest of my life. Wasn't expecting anything funded at all.

 

Anyway, I just found out last week that I was accepted into one of the PhD programs I applied to in chemistry, in a large university in central Ohio, with a 19k/yr assistantship that I dont even remember applying for. Obviously I took up the offer and now Im moving down to their campus this week to attend orientations and stuff.

 

No offense to you  cwes7675, you may be really enjoying your school, but I really don't recommend this approach. I had a 2.8 out undergrad, so I can sympathize with this thread, but I don't think it's wise to go for breadth over depth on apps. Reasons:

 

 1. You end up spending a buttload of money (especially if you have to pay to send GRE score reports too).

 2. You can't spend as much time researching each of your programs and thus risk ending up at a school that you might hate (and you'll be there for five or six years!)

 3. You can't dedicate as much effort to each individual application as you could if you reduced it to just a few.

 

IMHO, the best strategy to compensate for a low GPA is to work really hard making everything else in your app better. Study fiercely for the GREs and take it multiple times to increase your score. Get exquisite letters of recommendation. Work your SOP until it shines (get help if you have to). Study the schools and study the process. Make sure the schools can see from your app that you are willing to work as hard as you need to in order to excel.  

 

For me, personally, I had a 2.8 out of undergrad and when I applied to my MFA I think what really got me in was my SOP (I'm a very strong writer, I had a unique vision, and I was one of the few people in my cohort that came from a theatre background instead of a film background -- something my department chair enjoyed). I think my portfolio was also strong. Third was probably my rec letters. It also helped that my program was fairly new to my school even though the school itself is fairly well known in the arts community.

Edited by roguesenna
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"MaxiJaz: The farther you get out of undergrad and the more you have to show, the less your GPA matters. GPA is a proxy for merit because most undergrads don't have enough meaningful accomplishments in their fields to assess merit (and the programs also want some assurance that you'll be able to pass the coursework/quals hurdles)."

 

I hope the places I have applied to this round have your refreshing take on undergrad GPAs. I didn't do horrible for a single parent, ended up with a 3.2 overall at a decent university. But compared to some of the folks I know that ended up with 3.6 and above, I've become a little worried. I am currently in a Master's program where my GPA is 3.79 overall and 3.89 in my major, but PhD programs are competitive and as I send in these applications I keep hoping that my undergrad GPA won't mean as much as the other stuff I have done. Here's to hoping!

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Ok im a little confused

Are there any success stories of anyone applying for a masters program right after completing undergrad and getting accepted?

I currently have a 2.949 hopefully will be a 3.0 by graduation . I'm taking the GRE in 15 days and I'm stressing about where I could possibly get accepted. I'm also an International Studies major

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I've just completed my first round of applications to a few BME/Cellular and Molecular Biology programs and am having a ton of anxiety moving forward. This past semester I managed to finish with a 3.64 semester GPA and raise my overall to a 2.95. I have a year of research experience and have presented two posters and given two presentations at two international conferences. My GRE scores are average V/Q/A 167/160/4.5. For my first round I applied only to Ph.D. programs at mid-range programs including my home institution. My undergraduate institution is notoriously difficult, and I've completed 4 years in the biomedical engineering program. I realize that it is highly unlikely that I will be accepted to Ph.D. program directly from undergrad. Moving forward I plan to apply to a number of masters programs with deadlines ranging from mid-January to the spring. My questions  are 1) Does anyone have Ph.D. success stories applying directly from undergrad? 2) Does anyone have suggestions for masters programs? I am particularly interested in synthetic biology. 3) Should I look for jobs/ internships and work until the next application cycle? I'm just trying to get comfortable with my options and trying not to stress out too much. Any advice would be appreciated :) !

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I'm in a similar situation as you. Graduated with a B.S. in BME from a top 20 program with a 2.91 last May. Had high semester GPA last two semesters. Currently applying to top-mid range programs in tissue engineering.  4.5 years of research experience in a tissue engineering lab, 1.5 years in a lab of an unrelated discipline, and have been working as a clinical researcher for a orthopedics company for almost a year (first an internship and and then full time). However, I don't have any publications as the PI of my tissue engineering lab left before I could finish my project. I did receive a small fellowship award and I contributed to a successful grant application, though. My gre scores are also average for the programs I'm applying to (V/Q/A 161/162/4.5). I expect two of the three rec letters to be very good as they're from the post-doc I worked with and the PI of my tissue engineering lab. The third is from another PI, but I didn't work as closely with her, so I'm assuming it won't be as spectacular. 

 

I'm having significant doubts as well given the 3.0 cutoffs and the competitiveness of BME programs. My mentor suggested than I do a post-bacc or apply for an NIH POSTBACCALAUREATE INTRAMURAL RESEARCH TRAINING AWARD (POSTBAC IRTA/CRTA) if I don't get accepted. I'll update if I receive any interviews or advice from rejecting institutions. 

 

I've just completed my first round of applications to a few BME/Cellular and Molecular Biology programs and am having a ton of anxiety moving forward. This past semester I managed to finish with a 3.64 semester GPA and raise my overall to a 2.95. I have a year of research experience and have presented two posters and given two presentations at two international conferences. My GRE scores are average V/Q/A 167/160/4.5. For my first round I applied only to Ph.D. programs at mid-range programs including my home institution. My undergraduate institution is notoriously difficult, and I've completed 4 years in the biomedical engineering program. I realize that it is highly unlikely that I will be accepted to Ph.D. program directly from undergrad. Moving forward I plan to apply to a number of masters programs with deadlines ranging from mid-January to the spring. My questions  are 1) Does anyone have Ph.D. success stories applying directly from undergrad? 2) Does anyone have suggestions for masters programs? I am particularly interested in synthetic biology. 3) Should I look for jobs/ internships and work until the next application cycle? I'm just trying to get comfortable with my options and trying not to stress out too much. Any advice would be appreciated :) !

 

 

I

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  • 4 weeks later...

My Undergraduate GPA was 2.71 while my MA GPA (with thesis) was 3.38. 5 Great recommendations and 14 years of teaching in my field. Any thoughts on my odds in the US? I applied to 13 universities. Live in Egypt. British Citizen.

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I did really crappy in undergrad for a variety of complicated reasons. My uGPA was a 2.3something from a big public university, ranked in the 40s at the time. I went for the experience, more so than the ranking, after doing well in high school.

 

Since I had such a lacklusted GPA from undergrad, I needed what I like to call a "redemption degree." Technically, I had all intentions of getting the degree regardless, but it definitely worked in my favor, given that I'm going to get a second master's now. I went to a very small private university for my first master's degree. I chose the school because it was the only school in the area that offered the program, and due to some pretty severe medical issues I was having, I couldn't go anywhere else. Locally, the school has a good reputation, however it's not really known outside of the state. I did really, really well there and came out with a 3.83 GPA. Along with my GPA, I have 8 years of professional work experience, great letters of recommendation, and a lot of life experience. Based on what I've been told, a great graduate school GPA weighs much heavier than a crappy undegrad GPA, but I guess that doesn't entirely apply to you currently, however it may one day.

 

My brother, on the other hand, is a junior at Cooper Union. That kid is brilliant, no joke. He claims he doesn't have "great grades," but of course, won't tell me what his GPA actually is. He is concerned that he won't get into the PhD program of his choosing and will have to do a one year master's at a school that doesn't have such crazy grade inflation. I think he's nuts, but time will tell.

 

That being said, just do well wherever you go. Your GPA does matter. I got turned away from a lot of jobs because my undergrad GPA wasn't where they wanted it to be.

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Well, I am here to share my own story.

 

I am a first-gen college grad; did a lot of things and exposed myself to diverse subjects both in High School and College. I was an academic slacker though so I got a 2.8 UGPA from the University of Texas at Dallas. I have strong grades in some areas, decent grade in others, and only one D+ in my academic career (which I retook and got a C+ on it) so in theory I have not had one single D academically that I have not made up for but still I have a 2.8 because of my Cs. Although I do not have any relevant experience in any fields I have learned a lot from just reading about other fields, in particular Theology which is one of the two programs I am applying to (the other one is History, which would be a continuation of my major - Historical Studies). The reason I do not have work experience is because I unwittingly assumed I was a Permanent Resident, thus thinking that this would bar me from several jobs to apply (I never did proper research into my status - which turned out to be a Citizen - or into which kind of jobs I could apply to, it was stupid of me as an undergrad but such is life).

 

Right now I am studying for my GRE and I am freaking out. I would like to know what is a decent grade given my GPA and academic transcript? Also, there is the fact I do have interesting ideas and am a very good communicator.

 

I also commend those of you who have gotten into Grad Schools even though the grades and GRE were sub par.

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My undergrad gpa is 2.81 and my major is cs. But i want to change to business for masters. What are my chances at business grad schools with my low cgpa and cs major ? I am not looking for very good schools, a normal school will be great for me.

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Man, I have an awful undergraduate past, including many F's / 0s from multiple unis.  I have a 4.0 in my MA studies (Regional public uni), but I don't think that's very impressive.  I would suggest to anyone taking the GRE to seriously study for it, as I've been informed that many programs will use it to at least cut through the mess of apps.  Mine was good enough to get to the table (which I think is the goal for a bad GPA student - Though I regret only taking a week to study for it as I think an otherwordly score that was probably within my reach would likely have sealed many of the deals), and I've received a good (and surprising) deal of interest from programs (I applied to the top programs).  No official accepptances yet, but 4 interviews and one scheduled visit, and still to hear back from a bevy of programs.

 

Also, I would suggest addressing the bad marks in the SOP.  I put aside a paragraph for that (at the advice of a program's grad director and one of my advisors), and it certainly doesn't seem like it has hurt my chances.

 

Best of luck, fellow misfits !  Don't hang your head, you may be surprised at how appealing you still are !

Edited by trizzleYO
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Put me in this boat as well. I will finish with a GPA just short of 2.95 (assuming all goes as planned.), but I have had a 4.0 over my last 35 credits (with 16 more to go), all in my field, mostly 400 level. I took a long break in the middle of my undergrad, so I'm hoping that they only look at the late stuff. What annoyed me was that, thanks to early deadlines, my most recent semester (4.0 in 18 credits, all 300 and 400 classes) wasn't on my transcript.

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My uGPA was 2.87, however I was accepted as an intern right now I have a 4.0 GPA for my post bac work. But I just recently applied for an MA program and anxiously awaiting...this thread was a great read. I'm happy to know that academic felons can get into grad school! :) 

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Definitely an academic felon here. I don't even know where to start. Most of you guys seem to be on the science and engineering side - My experience is in arts but I thought I'd share because the take away really is that it's less the number than what you can show that you've done.

I ended up with a 2.6 or so (I don't even remember it because it really makes me almost physically ill to look at the transcript) and that was after 1.5 yrs of carrying a 3.8 at the end of undergrad. At one point it was below 2.0. It was years of failing, taking classes over twice and failing those, suspended multiple times, on probation a lot, lots of family and personal issues... Basically years of abject misery because I was not emotionally mature and had been raised to keep problems to yourself and never seek help, so I tried the same stupid things over and over. The main problem for me was a family that that very narrow and high expectations and being confused by what I was interested in - I really love bio but turns out research is not for me even though I actually really liked lab work. I just didn't know what else there was and just kept banging my head on the wall over and over.

Then I decided to make a clean break and spent an academic year at a totally different school with a vocational focus. That taught me that I was still academically capable and that a lot of mental baggage was holding me down. Eventually I changed majors and everything suddenly clicked. I earned almost all As and made sure to get to know some of my profs who went in to write my letters this round. I was hoping to pull my GPA up to 3.0 but it just wasn't happening with all the failure on the books.

I graduated a couple of years ago and pretty much gave up the idea of grad school. But as a result I worked my butt off on my own because I thought it was either that or I was never going to have a career. I stayed in touch with professors, took on independent projects, networked online and met people who eventually gave me an outlet to publish some writing in small venues, and I got some exhibition opportunities.

I think those two years really gave me the confidence to pursue my own ideas and be assertive, so last year, when I started wanting to use media that I had never learned, I decided I wanted to go to school for a second chance to learn it. I asked the MFA programs in my area if I could still apply with a sub 3.0 and they said they are willing to consider extenuating circumstances, so I applied. I explicitly addressed these issues in the personal statement (thank goodness this was an additional document - I would have never properly fit it into the SOP) with mentions of the personal family issues, what I learned, and how it all ultimately strengthens my practice. It was really heartfelt and I had an emotional time writing it. I was very frank about my flaws in the past. I don't know that that would work for all disciplines but I think you could tell it was not excuses, more like hard lessons learned.

I think it helped that I had an upwards trend in grades at the end and that my letters were from people I knew had my back because they had helped me advance in the past. I picked people who had recommended me to colleagues in the past, given me opportunities or asked me to work with them. I got involved in local organizations and was lucky enough to get an internship with a collective most people on the scene recognize and like. I have no idea why they picked me for that internship in the first place but thank goodness they did. I feel like it has opened doors because the work has been shown as prominent places.

So far I've gotten two interviews and one acceptance to an MFA program. One interviewer asked me to address my record directly and I feel like I was able to explain without being negative. In the other interview they didn't even bring it up, which is sort of encouraging - it seems like they are not overly concerned with it! I think it helped that I did do my failing at a prestigious school and that I was two years out and had continued to do work independent of faculty direction. I do have the benefit of being in a field where the work matters more than the grades, but I think that applies to research too.

It's been such a ridiculously long journey but looking back a lot of things make sense and I really doubt I could've gotten to this point without all the pain, which was really the pain of learning the hard way.

If you really want to go to grad school, don't let the GPA stop you. Reach out to faculty at the schools you like, keep in touch with people who have a good impression of you and just keep building up experience. If you can show that you have matured and learned and are a thoughtful person with good ideas despite your grades, then I still think you have a good chance. If you can turn your experience into a plus, do it, because sometime certain departments are looking for diversity of experience to round out the incoming class.

Anyway, that's my screed! If I can come back from such a huge fail, everyone can!

Edited by iomarch
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Definitely an academic felon here. I don't even know where to start. Most of you guys seem to be on the science and engineering side - My experience is in arts but I thought I'd share because the take away really is that it's less the number than what you can show that you've done.

I ended up with a 2.6 or so (I don't even remember it because it really makes me almost physically ill to look at the transcript) and that was after 1.5 yrs of carrying a 3.8 at the end of undergrad. At one point it was below 2.0. It was years of failing, taking classes over twice and failing those, suspended multiple times, on probation a lot, lots of family and personal issues... Basically years of abject misery because I was not emotionally mature and had been raised to keep problems to yourself and never seek help, so I tried the same stupid things over and over. The main problem for me was a family that that very narrow and high expectations and being confused by what I was interested in - I really love bio but turns out research is not for me even though I actually really liked lab work. I just didn't know what else there was and just kept banging my head on the wall over and over.

Then I decided to make a clean break and spent an academic year at a totally different school with a vocational focus. That taught me that I was still academically capable and that a lot of mental baggage was holding me down. Eventually I changed majors and everything suddenly clicked. I earned almost all As and made sure to get to know some of my profs who went in to write my letters this round. I was hoping to pull my GPA up to 3.0 but it just wasn't happening with all the failure on the books.

I graduated a couple of years ago and pretty much gave up the idea of grad school. But as a result I worked my butt off on my own because I thought it was either that or I was never going to have a career. I stayed in touch with professors, took on independent projects, networked online and met people who eventually gave me an outlet to publish some writing in small venues, and I got some exhibition opportunities.

I think those two years really gave me the confidence to pursue my own ideas and be assertive, so last year, when I started wanting to use media that I had never learned, I decided I wanted to go to school for a second chance to learn it. I asked the MFA programs in my area if I could still apply with a sub 3.0 and they said they are willing to consider extenuating circumstances, so I applied. I explicitly addressed these issues in the personal statement (thank goodness this was an additional document - I would have never properly fit it into the SOP) with mentions of the personal family issues, what I learned, and how it all ultimately strengthens my practice. It was really heartfelt and I had an emotional time writing it. I was very frank about my flaws in the past. I don't know that that would work for all disciplines but I think you could tell it was not excuses, more like hard lessons learned.

I think it helped that I had an upwards trend in grades at the end and that my letters were from people I knew had my back because they had helped me advance in the past. I picked people who had recommended me to colleagues in the past, given me opportunities or asked me to work with them. I got involved in local organizations and was lucky enough to get an internship with a collective most people on the scene recognize and like. I have no idea why they picked me for that internship in the first place but thank goodness they did. I feel like it has opened doors because the work has been shown as prominent places.

So far I've gotten two interviews and one acceptance to an MFA program. One interviewer asked me to address my record directly and I feel like I was able to explain without being negative. In the other interview they didn't even bring it up, which is sort of encouraging - it seems like they are not overly concerned with it! I think it helped that I did do my failing at a prestigious school and that I was two years out and had continued to do work independent of faculty direction. I do have the benefit of being in a field where the work matters more than the grades, but I think that applies to research too.

It's been such a ridiculously long journey but looking back a lot of things make sense and I really doubt I could've gotten to this point without all the pain, which was really the pain of learning the hard way.

If you really want to go to grad school, don't let the GPA stop you. Reach out to faculty at the schools you like, keep in touch with people who have a good impression of you and just keep building up experience. If you can show that you have matured and learned and are a thoughtful person with good ideas despite your grades, then I still think you have a good chance. If you can turn your experience into a plus, do it, because sometime certain departments are looking for diversity of experience to round out the incoming class.

Anyway, that's my screed! If I can come back from such a huge fail, everyone can!

iomarch -- Really great to hear and congrats to you!

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one way to deal with a low undergrad GPA is to sign up for a professional course.  I took a 1 year certificate course at a nearby university while i was working right after undergrad.  It was basically open to anyone and was about $3k out of pocket, maybe 15 credits of evening courses.  However I made sure to study like crazy and get a very high GPA in the program.  It gave me something to put on the top of my resume, with a high GPA and showed commitment to learning.  Yes it took me longer to get going on the Masters, but I was surprised how many doors success in this program opened for me.  Plus the teachers were in the industry and able to write me better LORs.  

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