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Canadian Universities MSW. The waiting game 2013 admissions


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At the end of the day, that MSW designation is what is going to help land you a job.  Although you may not like the Ryerson program, you will undoubtedly learn something that will help you in your career. Sure, Ryerson doesn't have the same ivy league appeal of U of T or other highly ranked universities but it is AMAZING for social work. If you get accepted, don't minimize it for a second.  It is an excellent school for social work and you will receive a quality education. Best of luck!  

 

Absolutely.  I doubt many will care where you did your degree, except perhaps if your goal is to do a Phd.  Potential employers will be much more concerned with your qualifications, your experience, and what you learned during your studies.  As long as the school is accredited, I wouldn't worry too much about it.

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OMG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! have just been accepted into Laurier 's 2 year MSW! via email!

PS honestly everyone in this forum should get in. If you are determined enough and care enough to constantly follow-up on a forum like this then you display the passion and drive that social workers s

Well, I got some very happy news today and an offer to attend UVic.  I had been eighth on the waitlist.  This was my first choice, and so I have decided to withdraw from my spot at Dalhousie.  If ther

Hang in there everyone!

For those who have been accepted to Laurier, do you know how soon, after the initial acceptance, we will receive the package in the mail?

Am not sure... probably after you accept the offer? congrats on your acceptance btw!

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Am not sure... probably after you accept the offer? congrats on your acceptance btw!

Thanks. And to you!  Did you accept yours?  I don't know whether it`s binding after I click accept, but I think I will wait for one more decision before I do.  I`m curious as to whether or not we have to accept the offer first before we can see if we've been considered for a scholarship.

 

I was accepted into Laurier last year and only found out when I received my package in the mail.

Interesting.  I received an e-mail from the graduate studies faculty, but nothing in the mail.

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I apologize in advance if I extend this forum too far beyond admissions decisions.  I know it is a stressful time, but I think this is interesting.  I just came across this blog post about anti-semitism from a professor at UofT Social Work.  It`is from 2011, so not too long ago.  It reminds me that social work can be very politically charged.  I would not have expected this from a professor at UofT, but there you have it.

http://eyecrazy.blogspot.ca/2011/06/anti-semitism-and-classroom-jew-count.html

``Bhuyan, an untenured Assistant Professor, who never offered a public apology for her behaviour, was rewarded by the University with a contract renewal .  That development has frustrated a number of professors in a dysfunctional Social Work Department that remains divided in opposing camps.  Lightman insists this matter must be exposed and wrote a recent article about it for The Journal for the Study of Anti-Semitism. 

Lightman asserts, “It’s ironic that a department purporting to teach anti-racism is incapable of dealing with racism in its own house. We have a responsibility to students to ensure faculty do not abuse the power inherent in their positions, and to the community-at-large to ensure all the Social Workers it graduates reflect and promote the values of the field. That hasn’t happened here." 

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I apologize in advance if I extend this forum too far beyond admissions decisions.  I know it is a stressful time, but I think this is interesting.  I just came across this blog post about anti-semitism from a professor at UofT Social Work.  It`is from 2011, so not too long ago.  It reminds me that social work can be very politically charged.  I would not have expected this from a professor at UofT, but there you have it.http://eyecrazy.blogspot.ca/2011/06/anti-semitism-and-classroom-jew-count.html'>http://eyecrazy.blogspot.ca/2011/06/anti-semitism-and-classroom-jew-count.html``Bhuyan, an untenured Assistant Professor, who never offered a public apology for her behaviour, was rewarded by the University with a contract renewal .  That development has frustrated a number of professors in a dysfunctional Social Work Department that remains divided in opposing camps.  Lightman insists this matter must be exposed and http://www.jsantisemitism.org/pdf/jsa_2-2.pdf'>wrote a recent article about it for The Journal for the Study of Anti-Semitism. Lightman asserts, “It’s ironic that a department purporting to teach anti-racism is incapable of dealing with racism in its own house. We have a responsibility to students to ensure faculty do not abuse the power inherent in their positions, and to the community-at-large to ensure all the Social Workers it graduates reflect and promote the values of the field. That hasn’t happened here." 
Don't apologize. This is a very important discussion. I find that absolutely disgusting. Wow. I never want to see that professor. As a Jewish individual myself I am appalled. What in the world??
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This is an incredibly sensitive topic. However, I would caution anyone from jumping to any harsh conclusions without *all* of the information presented.  But yes you are so right, social work can indeed be politically charged.  It is so important to explore our prejudices (we all have them) and understand where we stand on emotionally charged topics. Personally, I think it is great to have this type of dialogue in a class. Not because it is okay to spew racist ignorance, but because we need to feel safe talking about what makes us uncomfortable.  If we shut down dialogue every time we are offended, it stops us from learning. 

As social workers, we will come across all sorts of situations that challenge our values and beliefs. In a social work classroom, you need to feel that you can safely express yourself without it leaking out to be judged by people only hearing excerpts.

I recall years ago when I was completing my BSW, a student in my class quite tearfully spoke about her deeply ingrained *hate* for muslims.  She was an Israeli Jew and had been brought up with a certain anger towards them. She had no idea how she would be able to work with a muslim client.  This was such a great discussion. She talked about things that normally we would keep to ourselves. In hindsight, if it got out, people would have admonished her for being prejudice/racist.  However, those of us in the class realized that it was an important exercise in exploring our personal barriers. How can we possibly help others explore themselves when we don't know ourselves?

 

I apologize in advance if I extend this forum too far beyond admissions decisions.  I know it is a stressful time, but I think this is interesting.  I just came across this blog post about anti-semitism from a professor at UofT Social Work.  It`is from 2011, so not too long ago.  It reminds me that social work can be very politically charged.  I would not have expected this from a professor at UofT, but there you have it.

http://eyecrazy.blogspot.ca/2011/06/anti-semitism-and-classroom-jew-count.html

``Bhuyan, an untenured Assistant Professor, who never offered a public apology for her behaviour, was rewarded by the University with a contract renewal .  That development has frustrated a number of professors in a dysfunctional Social Work Department that remains divided in opposing camps.  Lightman insists this matter must be exposed and wrote a recent article about it for The Journal for the Study of Anti-Semitism. 

Lightman asserts, “It’s ironic that a department purporting to teach anti-racism is incapable of dealing with racism in its own house. We have a responsibility to students to ensure faculty do not abuse the power inherent in their positions, and to the community-at-large to ensure all the Social Workers it graduates reflect and promote the values of the field. That hasn’t happened here." 

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This is an incredibly sensitive topic. However, I would caution anyone from jumping to any harsh conclusions without *all* of the information presented.  But yes you are so right, social work can indeed be politically charged.  It is so important to explore our prejudices (we all have them) and understand where we stand on emotionally charged topics. Personally, I think it is great to have this type of dialogue in a class. Not because it is okay to spew racist ignorance, but because we need to feel safe talking about what makes us uncomfortable.  If we shut down dialogue every time we are offended, it stops us from learning. 

As social workers, we will come across all sorts of situations that challenge our values and beliefs. In a social work classroom, you need to feel that you can safely express yourself without it leaking out to be judged by people only hearing excerpts.

I recall years ago when I was completing my BSW, a student in my class quite tearfully spoke about her deeply ingrained *hate* for muslims.  She was an Israeli Jew and had been brought up with a certain anger towards them. She had no idea how she would be able to work with a muslim client.  This was such a great discussion. She talked about things that normally we would keep to ourselves. In hindsight, if it got out, people would have admonished her for being prejudice/racist.  However, those of us in the class realized that it was an important exercise in exploring our personal barriers. How can we possibly help others explore themselves when we don't know ourselves?

While I completely agree that these conversations need to be held in class and that they are fantastic to have, the professor should be acting as a mediator and not a biased individual spewing hatred to other students. 

 

Now whether this entire story is true or not I am not certain. But a professor needs to take all sides into consideration as well. I cannot imagine how uncomfortable the Jewish students in the class must have felt- particularly if they had family in the Holocaust.

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Absolutely true. It is hard not get emotionally charged when you read an article like this one but as you said, we don't really know what is true and what is not. I guess I would rather err on the side of caution.  I have to have faith that the social work Dept at U of T did a thorough investigation. As well, we cannot assume that this professor was not disciplined (for confidentiality reasons, they would never disclose that).  We only have a very small piece of the story told by a third party who is quoting some of the people present and some who were not there at all.

However, if it is true that the professor didn't mediate this discussion in an unbiased manner, I hope they did deal with her appropriately.

 

While I completely agree that these conversations need to be held in class and that they are fantastic to have, the professor should be acting as a mediator and not a biased individual spewing hatred to other students. 

 

Now whether this entire story is true or not I am not certain. But a professor needs to take all sides into consideration as well. I cannot imagine how uncomfortable the Jewish students in the class must have felt- particularly if they had family in the Holocaust.

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Absolutely true. It is hard not get emotionally charged when you read an article like this one but as you said, we don't really know what is true and what is not. I guess I would rather err on the side of caution.  I have to have faith that the social work Dept at U of T did a thorough investigation. As well, we cannot assume that this professor was not disciplined (for confidentiality reasons, they would never disclose that).  We only have a very small piece of the story told by a third party who is quoting some of the people present and some who were not there at all.

However, if it is true that the professor didn't mediate this discussion in an unbiased manner, I hope they did deal with her appropriately.

 

Excuse me? There is no "mediating the discussion in an unbiased manner". You can either be tolerant to all races/religions/cultures, or you can choose to be hateful. Whenever someone speaks against a religious group as a whole in a demeaning manner, there is no other side. I am surprised and not surprised at the same time that very few people spoke up. I know they were afraid of receiving a bad grade in that class, but not speaking up is the same as agreeing. What we should all take from this is that whenever wrongful things are being said, we must stand up and correct them - it is our responsibility as decent human beings.

 

This is what happens when we do not speak up.

First they came for the socialists,

and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a socialist.

Then they came for the trade unionists,

and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a trade unionist.

Then they came for the Jews,

and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a Jew.

Then they came for me,

and there was no one left to speak for me.

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While I completely agree that these conversations need to be held in class and that they are fantastic to have, the professor should be acting as a mediator and not a biased individual spewing hatred to other students.

Now whether this entire story is true or not I am not certain. But a professor needs to take all sides into consideration as well. I cannot imagine how uncomfortable the Jewish students in the class must have felt- particularly if they had family in the Holocaust.

I went to York for four years. It was four years of hate towards jews and Israel. Made me extremely uncomfortable as a Jewish student. Not surprised it happened at UofT.

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In a social work classroom, we often discuss our prejudices and biases. A skilled professor can indeed facilitate discussion about an emotionally charged subject to encourage learning for everyone. Again, the article is quoting people who were not there and it is important to realize that you are hearing a story third hand.  You may feel that this is enough to vilify the professor but I choose to be more cautious.  

 

Excuse me? There is no "mediating the discussion in an unbiased manner". You can either be tolerant to all races/religions/cultures, or you can choose to be hateful. Whenever someone speaks against a religious group as a whole in a demeaning manner, there is no other side. I am surprised and not surprised at the same time that very few people spoke up. I know they were afraid of receiving a bad grade in that class, but not speaking up is the same as agreeing. What we should all take from this is that whenever wrongful things are being said, we must stand up and correct them - it is our responsibility as decent human beings.

 

This is what happens when we do not speak up.

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I am glad to see some people in their 30s attending grad school. I guess I won't be the only one. :)  When I was 21, I didn't have the mindset to do a B.A., never mind grad school. Funny how life can take you on a different path.  

 

Off topic, but how old is everyone here?  I'm going to be 32 when I start my MSW and I have a feeling that I will be much older than most of my classmates.

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I am curious to know if anyone has inquired about student loans? Do grad students in Ontario tend to get more generous loans than undergrad? I completed an online calculator from my home province and if I used it correctly I am not going to get much money left over after paying for tuition and books. Maybe $350 per mth for living expenses. Luckily I've been building a grad study fund otherwise I may have needed to turn my offer(s) down because of the student loan amount. Imagine...  

Edited by jenste
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Off topic, but how old is everyone here?  I'm going to be 32 when I start my MSW and I have a feeling that I will be much older than most of my classmates.

 

I'm 25 going on 26. Never too late I say. Although, I've been working and in school since 2006. Ugh.

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I am curious to know if anyone has inquired about student loans? Do grad students in Ontario tend to get more generous loans than undergrad? I completed an online calculator from my home province and if I used it correctly I am not going to get much money left over after paying for tuition and books. Maybe $350 per mth for living expenses. Luckily I've been building a grad study fund otherwise I may have needed to turn my offer(s) down because of the student loan amount. Imagine...  

 

I've thought this too Jenste. I'm assuming that OSAP or any student loans agency would grant more for graduate programs. I would hope at least. If not, then I would have to look at other options. I'm already looking at 35 k in students loan debt, why not another 15?

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Thanks. And to you!  Did you accept yours?  I don't know whether it`s binding after I click accept, but I think I will wait for one more decision before I do.  I`m curious as to whether or not we have to accept the offer first before we can see if we've been considered for a scholarship.

Am also waiting to hear from UoT before I accept....fortunately I have until April 18th to do so....am hearing decisions for UoT should be out by then.... I would like to think so too re internal scholarships on admission... I dont really wanna get my hopes up though....hopefully we all get something at least to start us off....:)

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Me too. U of T is my first choice. Not because of the city but because of the health and mental health option, which the other schools I applied to don't have. U of T also has a very good reputation, in general. At first, I almost wasn't going to apply because I thought I wouldn't be able to get in since it's top notch and very competitive. But who knows, I might surprise myself in a good way.

 

My Laurier deadline is also April 18. I hope the U of T letter will arrive by then. I am out of province so it will probably take an extra day to arrive. If I don't get in to U of T I am just going to accept the Laurier offer. I have already begun to look up maps of Kitchener and housing web sites in the area, even thought it's still 5 months away. lol

 

Anyone know if the Kitchener campus has a library or school gym? It's very small apparently, with only 280 students at that campus. It probably has a bit of a high school feel to it, other than the heavy workload we will be getting. lol

 

Am also waiting to hear from UoT before I accept....fortunately I have until April 18th to do so....am hearing decisions for UoT should be out by then.... I would like to think so too re internal scholarships on admission... I dont really wanna get my hopes up though....hopefully we all get something at least to start us off.... :)

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