Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
jesso21

2009 Library Science Programs (masters)

Recommended Posts

I have heard that many people cho0se to go the SJSU route. I applied there as my Plan B in case I wasn't accepted to UCLA. SJSU and UCLA are, as you are probably aware, the only two ALA-accredited programs in CA so both are very popular programs.

SJSU Pros (as I see it): Convenience - being able to keep your present job and take classes. ALA accreditation. No GRE requirement.

SJSU Cons: Lack of personal contact. Expense - as a Special Sessions program, it's not cheap and financial aid options are, I believe, more limited.

Finally, I know a professor whose friend is currently in the SJSU program. Her friend reported that the program is not exactly difficult but it can be quite time-consuming and coursework deadlines are non-negotiable.

Without getting too personal, do you think you have a really good shot at UCLA next year? I would be happy to discuss it further with you if you send me a private message.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, this morning I received another surprise. I was admitted into the Master of Science in Information program at University of Michigan!

Revising my statements paid off in a big way! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone here receive funding information from UNC Chapel Hill? I have been emailing them to ask if packages were sent out, but they have not responded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey everyone - This may not be the best place to ask this, but here goes... I have applied to MLIS programs and hope to work in a special library (hopefully news or law) - at least those are my goals now. When researching MLIS programs I came across UC Berkeley's master of information management and systems and Columbia's master of information and archive management. I especially like the sound of Columbia's program, but I can't help but notice that neither of them are ALA-accredited. With what I want to do I'm wondering if Berkeley or Columbia would even be possibilities for me. Also, if anyone has attended either program I would LOVE to hear about it from people in the know - especially Columbia's. Also, for anyone that has gone through either program, hired people from either program, or know about people from either program - what professional paths do they usually follow? What are the main advantages and disadvantages of those programs? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did anyone here receive funding information from UNC Chapel Hill? I have been emailing them to ask if packages were sent out, but they have not responded.

I haven't received anything in mail/email but I navigated their system to find my EFAN... they offered me 400 dollars for the year as a non-resident. Hope you had better luck!

Here's the page I started on: http://studentaid.unc.edu/ and then went to the EFAN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I highly recommend attending an ALA-accredited program. I state this because most employers will not hire someone without an ALA-accredited degree.

Michigan girl - thanks for the advice. Couple of questions though - if you don't mind of course. You mentioned that you applied and got accepted ( :) ) into Michigan's School of Information and you seem to also be interested in social work. Are you going for a MLIS, and are you planning to enter into the library world, and, if so, doing what? I ask because I am interested in learning what people are doing outside public and school librarianship (if that is even you). If you're not doing something in the more "traditional" library realm, is it as necessary to have a MLIS from an ALA-accredited institution? Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michigan girl - thanks for the advice. Couple of questions though - if you don't mind of course. You mentioned that you applied and got accepted ( :) ) into Michigan's School of Information and you seem to also be interested in social work. Are you going for a MLIS, and are you planning to enter into the library world, and, if so, doing what? I ask because I am interested in learning what people are doing outside public and school librarianship (if that is even you). If you're not doing something in the more "traditional" library realm, is it as necessary to have a MLIS from an ALA-accredited institution? Thanks again!

Not her. But it's pretty straightforward - if you want to be a librarian of any sort, go to an ALA-accredited program. Libraries are libraries. The programs you mentioned are not accredited (probably not surprising, as the lack of the word "library" in either program title was likely a tipoff) and you won't find them in the U.S. News and World Report rankings of MLIS programs.

You mentioned you've applied to MLIS programs. What schools are you looking at? Will you be applying again next year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

grad, I noticed you are interested in special libraries (law or news). You should attend an ALA-accredited program. Although the Special Libraries Association does not have its own code of ethics, it does adhere to ALA accreditation standards. The U.S. News rankings does list some special libraries (law, health) on their website. Therefore, if you are serious about a library career (public, special, academic), attend an ALA-accredited program. Accreditation is very important in the job market.

Why did I choose the social work and information programs? I'm actually non-traditional in a sense. I am not interested in clinical practice or traditional public libraries. I learned that both schools offer lots of flexibility and options (macro practice, information technology). I can still minor in library and information services if I want to work with special libraries and other information centers. The main goal is I want to help people.

...Social workers and other human service workers routinely encounter automated systems in their work. Social work students learn to address practices that have given rise to the digital divide and to empower diverse communities to engage in community decision-making...

Your career options include program development or evaluation for a community technology center, technology for strategic planning, program evaluation for nonprofit social service organizations or agencies, online advocacy, community outreach, and many more...

http://www.si.umich.edu/msi/dual/msw-msi.htm

Since both programs are accredited, I can tailor my coursework to suit my professional needs.

I know Michigan is an elite university with top-ranked programs, and the degree will open many doors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've applied to four master's program for library and information studies: San Jose State (MLIS), Simmons College (MLS), Rutgers University (MLIS), and UCLA (MLIS).

Are there any alums or current students from these schools that can offer their thoughts on the programs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My MLS is from Simmons GSLIS, and I really liked the program. However, I think that it depends a lot on what your focus/specialty will be. Are you hoping to be an academic librarian, a law librarian, school librarian, archivist? Tech librarian?

While I don't think the rankings are "all that," some people do take them seriously. The new ones for 2009 just came out, and Simmons has moved up the list since the last ranking, both in the core LIS category and in archives (and maybe in school lib? not sure about that).

Anyway, I'd weigh your specialty against the $$ and decide-- where do you see yourself? If you want to live/stay in New England, Simmons is the place to go; this might be a bit of hyperbole, but sometimes it seems like half of the librarians in the Northeast went there for their MLS. I can't really speak about the other schools I mentioned, but maybe someone else will pipe up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi santa!

Thanks for your response; I appreciate it! I am most interested in news librarianship and law librarianship; special librarianship in general. How is Simmons for those specialties? As to where I'll likely end up settling, I would like to be in the greater Los Angeles area. I really liked Simmons at first, but then I read some things on forums like this where people said the program can be rather disorganized and job placement upon graduation wasn't great. It is really important to me for the program I attend to have a strong internship program and I, I'm sure like many others, would like a higher job placement rate upon graduation. Any additional thoughts?

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi michigan girl,

I know this probably isn't the best way to go about choosing a grad school, but location is important to me, so that was a pretty significant factor to me while applying. I did know about U of Washington's law librarianship track, but couldn't see myself living happily there, so I didn't apply. I just received a rejection letter from UCLA today :( so I'm still with Rutgers or Simmons (I really don't think I'm going to go for San Jose State as I'm just not hearing anything good). I'm also considering trying to find an internship, job, or volunteer position with a library and re-apply to UCLA for next year, as I think when all is said and done, they are my number one. I'm also going to try and find out if UCLA's MLIS program accepts transfers, or if I can at least transfer some credit.

Thanks for all your advice though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Masters in Professional Writing and I've applied to Kent State University for a second masters in library science. My packet was recently completed and I called the program office today to find out my status (in or out). The person I spoke to said that emails were sent out a couple of days ago, but she did some checking (while I waited on hold) and said that my application packet was still with the Dean's office and that I should hear something soon.

So, my question is -any thoughts as to whether I may get accepted? I am also looking for funding so that I can take more than one class each term.

I am driving myself a little crazy trying to read between the lines - so thanks for indulging me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey All,

I'm a newbie to the forum looking to apply for a 2010 program (Summer/Fall). I have four choices, as I must do the program online. My top are:

1. University of Alabama

2. San Jose State University

3. Clarion University of Pennsylvania

4. Emporia State University (which operates here in Portland, OR out of PSU)

Anyone have any tips and suggestions? I know lots of folks here are looking at top ranking schools, but those are quite out of the question for me. Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey All,

I'm a newbie to the forum looking to apply for a 2010 program (Summer/Fall). I have four choices, as I must do the program online. My top are:

1. University of Alabama

2. San Jose State University

3. Clarion University of Pennsylvania

4. Emporia State University (which operates here in Portland, OR out of PSU)

Anyone have any tips and suggestions? I know lots of folks here are looking at top ranking schools, but those are quite out of the question for me. Thanks in advance!

A few things . . .why do you have to do the program online? It's a degree all the same, but a willingness to do on-campus work opens up many more options, as well as giving you MUCH better extracurricular and networking opportunities. Secondly, any thoughts on what you'd like to find yourself doing with your degree? Finally, I wouldn't worry so much about the idea of "top ranking schools" . . .there's really only one well-known system of ranking MLIS programs (that being the U.S. News and World Report), and their methodology provides inconclusive results at best. So it's mostly about the personal fit with the program.

What's your admission profile look like (background, GPA, GRE, etc.)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mrkupe

Thanks for a speedy reply with some great questions. I have to stay in Portland because I've committed myself to helping my parents pay the mortgage for the next few years until the economy picks up, and while my husband finishes up his degree.

I'm very much interested in youth services - I was a reading tutor in an elementary school and am committed to youth literacy. But I'm also really nerdily excited about information structures and systems.

As far as my background - I will graduate this August from Portland State University with a BA in English and minor in Professional Writing. My GPA is 3.5, and I haven't taken the GRE just yet - going to study for a few months before I attempt that. I assume that most colleges are looking for a combined score of 1000 - what I've seen frequently while scanning the admissions pages. That's what I'm going to shoot for. My math skills are somewhat weak, but I've always done pretty well in language.

I've volunteered in libraries and held a clerk position for six months, but the plan is to get a part-time job in a library once I graduate...and failing that - some kind of volunteer position. I've also taken some library media assistance courses in children's literature and an introduction to reference.

That's me - I'm hoping that someone might be able to suggest or speak to their experience with any of the mentioned schools, or perhaps suggest others with better online programs. Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are no library science programs in Oregon or Washington?

The bottom line is you must receive an MLIS degree from an ALA-accredited institution. If it's not accredited, it's not worth the money or time. Attending a campus school is much better for your career prospects (access to internships, etc.).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michigan Girl,

Nope - there are no Library Science programs in Oregon - the only program offered is hosted at PSU through Emporia State University (Kansas) - they offer a distance SLIM featuring some online and in-class. It's $25,000 a year - which seems pricey for what is being offered. Especially since many other schools offer an entirely online experience for under $20,000 a year.

There is one school in Washington - The University of Washington program is wonderful and I considered it, but it's $45,000 a year for out-of-state grad tuition. For a state school. To me, that is NOT worth it. It's about as much as a year's salary as a librarian, and I already have $30,000 in student loans from undergraduate.

I'm not looking to get into an insane amount of debt. I've taken several classes online through PSU because I work 32 hours a week and go to school full-time. I am comfortable in an online environment and have successfuly passed many courses with A's and B's.

Since I'm not aiming for a pricey school - the internship/assistanship angle isn't one of the selling points of the MLIS program for me.

Thanks for all your help everyone!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mrkupe

Thanks for a speedy reply with some great questions. I have to stay in Portland because I've committed myself to helping my parents pay the mortgage for the next few years until the economy picks up, and while my husband finishes up his degree.

I'm very much interested in youth services - I was a reading tutor in an elementary school and am committed to youth literacy. But I'm also really nerdily excited about information structures and systems.

As far as my background - I will graduate this August from Portland State University with a BA in English and minor in Professional Writing. My GPA is 3.5, and I haven't taken the GRE just yet - going to study for a few months before I attempt that. I assume that most colleges are looking for a combined score of 1000 - what I've seen frequently while scanning the admissions pages. That's what I'm going to shoot for. My math skills are somewhat weak, but I've always done pretty well in language.

I've volunteered in libraries and held a clerk position for six months, but the plan is to get a part-time job in a library once I graduate...and failing that - some kind of volunteer position. I've also taken some library media assistance courses in children's literature and an introduction to reference.

That's me - I'm hoping that someone might be able to suggest or speak to their experience with any of the mentioned schools, or perhaps suggest others with better online programs. Thanks again!

First of all, I should note that I tend to side with michigan girl on this one . . .online programs are decent if you're already in a position to take advantage of the degree, but you are not. On-campus work not only gives you better work opportunities in the present sense, but it is MUCH better for funding, networking, career services, and building your future employment possibilities. Not that I would discourage you from your pursuit, but I don't think there's harm in telling you that online-only study does come with its share of disadvantages, especially if you're inclined towards librarianship.

Anyways. The idea here is to find some way to make this work for you. Your GPA is solid enough (and better than mine in undergrad!) to get into better programs than the ones you listed here. It sounds like you have plenty of material to draw upon for a good personal statement. As for GRE, 1000 gets you in the discussion at the lower-tier schools, but for the top progrmas you want to shoot higher, at least approaching 1200. On the bright side, I'm convinced that with the proper studying regimen just about anybody can get into that range, so tackle that beast when it comes up.

You can apply to one/some of the programs above, which I suspect you'll have little trouble getting into, but I'd also suggest applying to some better programs. UW is quite good but as you noted they are not cheap, and they do have some pretty high standards . . .nonetheless, I'd give it a shot. They'll know that you're an out of state student, so if they want you they may offer a relatively generous aid package, although I will admit that I am unfamiliar with how much money UW's department likes to throw around. As far as online goes, Illinois is VERY competitive to get into and might be a reach (as the top-rated program by U.S. News and World Report they attract a LOT of general interest), but their online program gets a lot of praise. Drexel isn't cheap but I have heard their online program is good as well.

Finally, I do agree that $25k/year is way too much . . .not that it's not a good education or that it won't ultimately be worth it, but frankly there are cheaper ways to go about this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in the DC area and want to stay local for now, so I am planning to apply to the MLIS programs at Catholic U. and U. of MD for the 2010 school year.

Anyone have any experience with either school? What are their financial packages like for this program?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.