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University of Massachusetts and University of Kansas are both funded based on TA-ships. If you have a TA-ship, you have a stipend, health insurance, and tuition waiver. You're not guaranteed two years of funding at either of them, but are likely to get through without incurring debt.

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Tulane is fully funded.  UT Austin occasionally funds their top candidates if they want them to stay on for the PhD (so perhaps this isn't what you're looking for?).  Its generally easier to get accepted to an MA than a PhD program, but my guess would be that funding is just as competitive, no matter the level.  Sadly, business schools produce more wealthy donor alums than do art history departments.  For all of our benefit, I'm keeping fingers crossed that the folks at the Gates Foundation are secretly art history fanatics!

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The Results Page is not opening in my laptop at the moment, but I think I saw an entry from someone there about getting a funded offer from Wisconsin-Madison and another from Missouri-Columbia.

 

Funding for Masters in many cases is available only for the US citizens, not for the International candidates.

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Tulane is fully funded.  UT Austin occasionally funds their top candidates if they want them to stay on for the PhD (so perhaps this isn't what you're looking for?).  Its generally easier to get accepted to an MA than a PhD program, but my guess would be that funding is just as competitive, no matter the level.  Sadly, business schools produce more wealthy donor alums than do art history departments.  For all of our benefit, I'm keeping fingers crossed that the folks at the Gates Foundation are secretly art history fanatics!

 

I'm sure the funding is just as competitive, but if the option of fully funded/mostly funded MAs are available at any given school, I would find such a list to be highly beneficial. I'd just like to outright not apply to programs that 1.) Won't give me any money or 2.) Only accept PhD applicants who already have an MA. 

 

The competitiveness isn't the issue so much as the list of possibilities? But this is a great thread idea, I hope people have some suggestions.

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From my conversations with UW-Madison, they do a diligent job of ensuring that all their admitted students have full or close to full funding for some period. Now, that might not translate into a guarantee of funding for the whole two years. 

 

I've heard that the Williams MA is always partially funded and, to boot, a great program for a terminal MA. Most schools state on their website whether or not they fund MA students. Rutgers and UPenn state unequivocally on their websites that they do not fund students applying to the terminal MA. 

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This is all great information! Thanks. I thought it would be helpful if we could just compile a list. 

 

I have another question. I'm gearing up for the cycle this upcoming fall and have done quite a bit of research. I know what I want to study, who and where I want to study. However, I feel that I would get significantly more (especially in terms of developing language skills) by doing the MA first. Plus, I am unsure of my chances of getting into a PhD program.

 

So, for places like UPenn, which is in my top choices, would you suggest that I apply to the MA program and let them know I hope to plan on continuing to the PhD program? I'm worried that if I apply for the MA strictly (and this is for any school), I will be cut out of funding anywhere, but that if I apply for the Phd then my chances for acceptance will be very low. Any thoughts? 

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When I was doing this a few years back for history MA's, I pulled up a long list of graduate programs (I think I used the US News and World Report rankings list -- a strangely hateful yet useful thing) then went to every single department's web site to check if they offered the remotest possibility of funding for masters students, whether it be a shot at the one MA assistantship offered or a chunk off tuition.

 

I noticed that elite universities almost never fund MA's.  They're banking on the idea that you'll shell out a lot to have their name on your CV.  But the truth is that you don't necessarily want to attend a name-brand kind of place if they're only using you as a cash cow and are lowering their standards to let you in.  You need professors who will help you, who are invested in your success enough to offer you financial support.  These will likely be found in reputable but less prestigious sorts of places.

 

It's a really good idea to make a list of funded MA programs.  Perhaps I should update my history list and post it -- it could save some future applicants a lot of time and money.

Edited by Katzenmusik
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Wait, UPenn or Penn State? "Upenn state" ? 

 

UPenn. "State" was the verb in the third person plural.

 

Assassina, the advice I was given by a few of my profs was to apply to a range of programs (size, rank, and degree offering) that fit your interests. I'd advise applying to both MA and PhD programs. You may turn out to be more competitive than you realize. That said, there seems to be a general notion on these fora that one need to jump straight into the top ten PhD programs and disregard the masters altogether. That works for some and it's certainly not a bad road to take, but if you find a good MA program, the masters can be a wonderful place to hone your interests and skills.

 

As for UPenn itself, there is a difference in most top tier programs between a terminal MA and an MA-PhD. The former has less funding, and may not have any (such as at UPenn), and can often be perceived as a cash cow. Often it's easier to get into though. I don't think telling the committees that you're interested in the PhD will open you up to funding in those situations. The MA-PhD is what you get when you apply to the PhD--you can earn or apply for your MA after a certain period of time, typically after writing a qualifying paper.

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So, for places like UPenn, which is in my top choices, would you suggest that I apply to the MA program and let them know I hope to plan on continuing to the PhD program? I'm worried that if I apply for the MA strictly (and this is for any school), I will be cut out of funding anywhere, but that if I apply for the Phd then my chances for acceptance will be very low. Any thoughts? 

 

Penn's art history department doesn't accept students from the terminal MA for the PhD. It seems to be an unwritten policy. If you want a PhD from Penn, you should either apply directly for the PhD or do a terminal MA somewhere with a good reputation--Williams and Tufts are the main two that come to mind. 

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This is all very helpful advice, thank you! I really appreciate it. My plan at the moment is to get an MA in Art History (preferably Architectura) and then a PhD in American Studies, although the more I research the more I'm considering switching to a PhD in Art History. So this is all very helpful to me personally! 

 

Lets keep the funded MA list going! 

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  • 2 weeks later...

SMU used to have GREAT funding for their terminal MA program.  They have a new PhD program with a strange title, so I don't know if that has drawn funding from their MA students or not. 

 

I agree--if you need funding, a terminal MA program is the way to go.  Just expect that some schools (like Harvard) will give you little or no credit for it if you apply for their PhD.

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If you apply to UCLA, you do so directly to it's PhD Program which has an en-route MA. So if you are accepted, you are likely guaranteed funding for all five years or so that you spend there.

 

As for terminal MAs, both University of Missouri-Columbia and Penn State were offering me funding. I believe Notre Dame may too but I'm not certain. 

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