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does anyone feel like they are putting their lives on hold?


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I feel the same. Life sucks and every day is like groundhog day. I get up, check e-mail (that's because i live in different time-zone, 9-12 hour difference), check both sites and then I just keep thinking about it while trying to distract myself with something. ANYTHING.

I don't want to go out with my friends anymore and my lovelife has stopped almost two months ago. I think people (except my mom) don't get how stressed I am. Everyone is so cheerful (i'm the only person applying) and I feel even more uncomfortable with my thoughts. Oh well.

and it keeps getting worse.

 

that was pathetic whining. i know

Edited by CleverCapybara
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This could not be more true for me. I just got my first acceptance to English PhD school a matter of minutes ago, but I also recieved a job offer for next year if I want to take it. My 3 year relationship is also on hold waiting to see if it will be plausible for us to live near each other. Agh I just want to hear from all these schools asap!

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Yes, I didn't want to write my graduation thesis which is due to be completed by Mar. 20. I'm getting crazy about the waiting game. There is still no news. I even hope that there is no weekends, so they can send their offers quickly!

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I'm so glad I'm not alone, or at least not having too strange a reaction to waiting. I'm also feeling completely stumped on my own (admittedly undergrad) thesis topic, and even being accepted at one of my top choices isn't good enough, since I won't hear back on whether I get funding for a while longer... My friend withdrew all her applications and started looking for a long-term job... I can appreciate how freeing that would be right about now, being stuck looking at summer jobs and internships only. I feel like I can't just make the jump to getting on with my "real life" until I can make a decision. "It's like my life is buffering" sums it up, I think.

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If you don't want or can't get a full-time job, temporary employment might be the way to go. I've pretty much been doing temp work ever since I graduated from college, and it seems to be working out thus far. Got lots of experience that way! And yeah, I know what you mean about cruel rejections. My first rejection letter was from my alma mater that I've basically poured my heart and soul into with no holding back. My second rejection letter, which arrived on the same day as the first, was from the place that I've been working for the past nine months.

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I didn't anticipate this feeling of my life being on hold... And wow, does it ever suck.

 

I need to start earning some money. I've been unemployed for a few months and told myself I'd start freelancing after application deadlines were done. But I'm only kind of half-assedly networking and trying to find clients because I don't *really* want to build my own business if I get get in to a PhD program. I am also completely tired of having to explain what I'm trying to do to everyone I know from industry... I will be so relieved when I can finally say "this is exactly what I am doing" (vs "well I'm hoping to get in to this PhD program but I really can't explain it to you because it's interdisciplinary and complicated and no, I don't know when I'll hear back"). 

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i had a good chat with a new friend last night about the "academic bubble"; we're both in the middle of taking time off after undergrad and before grad, although i'll be starting grad a year before her.

 

long conversation short, we both agreed that there are pros and cons to willingly staying in the "bubble" of continuing education, e.g., having no understanding of how major "real world" things like insurance and home ownership work, but being able to successfully navigate and politic in socially delicate situations in ways that our "real world" counterparts can't. i'm very fortunate to have two very supportive (albeit divorced) parents, one of whom is the source of my excellent healthcare and a godmother who is an expert at all things tax and insurance, and both of whom are independently wealthy and extremely supportive of my academic pursuits (i'm an only child and a total nerd, so i guess they didn't have a very excuse not to be, hah!). sadly, my friend is not so lucky; she's one of many and a first gen college grad.

 

i can't imagine how difficult it would be to wade through such murky waters without a strong, supportive network of friends and family who've got all this stuff down pat and have a lot of understanding of and/or respect for academic pursuits.

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