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Getting a Canadian Study Permit


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If you're a member of one of the designated countries (US, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Barbados, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, or Japan), you can submit your study permit application online. I think the fee is around $100?  It's a pretty simple application.  Once it's been processed and you're approved, you'll get a letter from the Canadian government that you just show at the border when you enter the country, and you'll be issued a study permit then.  The process is a little more complicated from other countries (some of my friend from Iran had to postpone the start of their programs because the process was taking so long), but if you're coming from any of the countries I listed above, you likely won't get denied and have no trouble.

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You should be getting this information from the school's International office. Or you can google the answer. If you can not apply online you will have to go to the closest Canadian Consulate and apply there. You can apply AS SOON AS you land in Canada (go to the Customs office at the airport) but there is no guarantee that you won't be turned away, so it is better to apply ahead of time. You will need information such as proof of sufficient funds to support yourself in Canada, a copy of your passport and maybe birth certificate, as well as a copy of your offer of admission/intent to enroll at a Canadian institution. If you can only prove sufficient funds for a year you may have to reapply annually. If not, you can try to get a visa for the extent of your stay.

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I am Jamaican currently on a two year study permit in Canada. I downloaded the form, filled it out on the computer and printed it out to sign it before taking it to the Canadian High Commission. The only issue I had was not knowing that they required a standard police certificate as well (along with the application fee receipt, the photos, and the other things that iphi mentioned). I was able to sort that out pretty quickly though, and I don't know if it's necessary for T&T residents to do that.

The application took about 4 or so weeks to process, and then the permit was issued May 30. I got it June 3, 2 months before I had to leave. The only people who were likely to get denied were the people who did not have all their documents in order.

The earlier you apply, the better. One of my friends who applied for a permit (about a year before I did) didn't get it until WEEKS after her school started, and that messed up her travel plans and everything. So... as soon as you can you should get your documents in order and apply.

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  • 11 months later...

Just FYI, the study permit rules are changing for students entering after June 1, 2014. Just minor changes, but here is a summary: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/media/notices/2014-02-12.asp

 

Also, this page will tell you all the things you need, provide checklists etc: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/applications/student.asp

Edited by TakeruK
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Shari, How much did you have to show financial wise to the embassy for school?

 

if you're renewing it i believe they're still asking over CAD$10,000 in a Canadian Bank (do CAD$11,000 to be on the safe side) 

 

if you're getting it for the first time SHOW THEM EVERYTHING (and by everything i mean EVERYTHING). the more money you show = the better your chances you'll get a permit without them getting suspicious. particularly now that the first batch of "bridge-lifting" policies are being implemented.  

Edited by spunky
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Anyone know if in question 4 - are they asking for the total cost of all the years of study and total money, or annual cost? The instructions don't specify.

 

For those US Americans who applied - did you submit bank info or any other financial forms - or just the funding offer from the Canadian school?

 

Also - the instructions say to fill out the family information form, etc. but my documents list doesn't ask for those to be uploaded - anyone else notice this?

 

This is for the IMM1294 form.

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I have a similar problem (I think). I need to apply for a Canadian study permit but I don't know how to make my case stronger (or if it's needed to make it stronger than it already is). I'm admitted to a PhD program at a Canadian university, and I received my admission letter stating that all tuition fees are covered + that I have a yearly scholarship of CAD$10,000 + a TA (of unspecified amount). Does this sound enough? I don't really have much money on my own, except of the ticket and some when I get there.

 

Also, what about your home situation? Proving ties to your home country? What do they ask/what constitutes a proof? The tricky part is that I don't have a steady job in my country, given that I've been a student for the past 5+ years (BA studies, two MAs, etc.) No idea if that can be a problem. I mean, I am not sure if they require you to show you have a job in your home country if you're a student... How can you be a student with a steady job? (At least it's impossible here). 

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I own an apartment in my home country and I have a husband, but I don't have a permanent job. Is that ok? I mean, we are students. I've dedicated years of my life to my studies. There was just not time for a big career. As for bank account, I have that, but not much money on it, I'm afraid. (My scholarship + TA cover my living expenses as well as tuition fees).

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I own an apartment in my home country and I have a husband, but I don't have a permanent job. Is that ok? I mean, we are students. I've dedicated years of my life to my studies. There was just not time for a big career. As for bank account, I have that, but not much money on it, I'm afraid. (My scholarship + TA cover my living expenses as well as tuition fees).

 

From what you wrote, you should be fine. They know that students and/or young people in general do not normally have strong ties like owning a home! What you describe sounds like almost all of the international student friends I know in Canada and the US.

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That's true. The thing is, I do own a home (not a house, but an apartment). What I lack is steady/full time employment. I hope it won't be a huge minus. 

 

In any case, that sounds encouraging! :)

 

well, you're ages ahead of me. i kept renewing my student permit throughout all my undergrad and my MA and i didn't have a home, let alone a steady employment or any kind of professional experience. 

 

so you're on the winning side here :D

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That's good to know! Though I suppose a lot depends on one's citizenship. People from developing countries have a harder time getting a study permit, AFAIK.

 

True. Then again I was born in Mexico..... So yeah, I fall in that list.

 

You'll be fine. As long as you have an official letter of acceptance, I'd say you're already half-way there. 

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