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I'm slowly coming to grips with the necessity for a plan B (not that it never occurred to me, it's just that the idea of going back into think tank or government work is pretty unattractive to me at this point).  I was wondering, are there any good programs that do rolling or Spring admissions?  Or, if I get shut out am I better off just waiting another year?  

 

I was chatting with one of my professors about using this year to teach at community colleges, etc. and he said that if I'm going to try again the best thing is to get further research experience.  Where I'm living currently has like zero research opportunities and moving somewhere to just jump back into applications again a year from now would really suck.  Any insights?

 

There are masters programs that I think still accept applications, like Syracuse.

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In at UPenn. I'm at a loss for words. I'm hoping everyone else who has been shut out so far receives some good news soon (hopefully a few more today who also get into Penn).

That was me.   I've applied for 4 rounds.   Finally.

I'm slowly coming to grips with the necessity for a plan B (not that it never occurred to me, it's just that the idea of going back into think tank or government work is pretty unattractive to me at this point).  I was wondering, are there any good programs that do rolling or Spring admissions?  Or, if I get shut out am I better off just waiting another year?  

 

I was chatting with one of my professors about using this year to teach at community colleges, etc. and he said that if I'm going to try again the best thing is to get further research experience.  Where I'm living currently has like zero research opportunities and moving somewhere to just jump back into applications again a year from now would really suck.  Any insights?

 

You could try emailing profs at colleges near you, to see if they need any RAs. Some profs take on full-time assistants (for example Chris Blattman @ Columbia put out a search for one like two months ago or something I think), while others might be open to hiring you on an hourly basis. Just send out a billion emails and attach your CV, and you might get a few positive replies.

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I'm not really WLed at my top choice, BUT getting in off the WL to the program could alter my decision. I have expressed my desire to stay on the Waitlist to the person in charge, and asked about stuff. Haven't done anythuing else. You might wanna let them know they're your first choice, but aside from that, Waiting's the name of the game, I think!

Thanks for the input. I've never been waitlisted anywhere (or even really thought about it as much of a possibility), so I'm not quite sure what to do in the situation :) 

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You could try emailing profs at colleges near you, to see if they need any RAs. Some profs take on full-time assistants (for example Chris Blattman @ Columbia put out a search for one like two months ago or something I think), while others might be open to hiring you on an hourly basis. Just send out a billion emails and attach your CV, and you might get a few positive replies.

 

Do you think that would work? I have a full-time job, but I've been wondering how to beef up my research work in the meantime...

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I'm slowly coming to grips with the necessity for a plan B (not that it never occurred to me, it's just that the idea of going back into think tank or government work is pretty unattractive to me at this point).  I was wondering, are there any good programs that do rolling or Spring admissions?  Or, if I get shut out am I better off just waiting another year?  

 

I was chatting with one of my professors about using this year to teach at community colleges, etc. and he said that if I'm going to try again the best thing is to get further research experience.  Where I'm living currently has like zero research opportunities and moving somewhere to just jump back into applications again a year from now would really suck.  Any insights?

Pretty much my only research experience has been as an RA for a few different professors at my undergrad university. I don't know if you're still in the area of your undergrad institution, but you could try that. You could also, as someone else suggested, reach out to any and all professors at universities in your current area. I think professors are often looking for research help but have no students willing (particularly in smaller departments and departments without graduate programs). You could also try getting a research-oriented policy job and spinning that experience in your new SOP. Good luck and don't lose hope!!

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I have a question for anyone waitlisted at one of their top choices: Is there anything you're doing to up your chances of getting accepted off the waitlist or contacting the school at all, or are you just "waiting" to hear back? 

 

 

I am wait-listed at one of my top choices. I emailed my POI and he basically said, "not much to do besides see how things play out." I am going to have a few faculty members with whom I'm close at a peer department email some faculty at the dept at which I'm waitlisted and let them know that it's my first choice. I think the more people who know your name and can be in a position to pull for you, the better.

 

I also think it's wise to let the DGS know that it's your top choice; I don't know how waitlists work -- whether you're numbered or they re-evaluate applicants if spots come open. But in either case, I think if they know you will attend if a spot is offered, they're more likely to offer it. 

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I am guessing they just haven't updated. He was DGS last year, but the torch has passed. Check out the administrative page on the Government site for the new DGS.

 

I'm sad the torch passed away from Dan Nexon. 

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I am wait-listed at one of my top choices. I emailed my POI and he basically said, "not much to do besides see how things play out." I am going to have a few faculty members with whom I'm close at a peer department email some faculty at the dept at which I'm waitlisted and let them know that it's my first choice. I think the more people who know your name and can be in a position to pull for you, the better.

 

I also think it's wise to let the DGS know that it's your top choice; I don't know how waitlists work -- whether you're numbered or they re-evaluate applicants if spots come open. But in either case, I think if they know you will attend if a spot is offered, they're more likely to offer it. 

Thanks for the input, packrat. That's quite helpful. That's pretty much what I was thinking as well, so it's nice to have it confirmed. I just sent an email :) 

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Is he DGS at SFS rather than Gov. or did they just fail to update his faculty page?

 

looks like its Howard (http://government.georgetown.edu/people/admin/)

 

however, previous posts had indicated some acceptances by phone were done by subfield chairs (accepted students reported on this forum had indicated IR, but not sure if all of the calls were IR) 

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In nearly every case (read: every case I have seen), waitlists are not ordered. They consist of a small group of students, all of whom we would be happy to admit, who can be used to balance the cohort as those who are admitted inform us about whether they plan to attend. This balance can be by sub-field, within subfields, or by gender or other ascriptive characteristics. Because there isn't much comparison that I have seen among students on the wait list, there isn't anything you can do except express interest, and given that that expression is not a costly signal it isn't clear how much it does at all.

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Only because they teased me with an unfunded offer last year (of course their funding structure is not typical for most programs).

 

I think they count on unfunded students going just for the brand. It's a bit cruel of them to do. 

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I think they count on unfunded students going just for the brand. It's a bit cruel of them to do. 

 

I'm pretty sure that's what Gtown does. I think GW does something similar? I was appalled at the number of DC-area schools that don't automatically guarantee funding to their admitted students.

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I'm pretty sure that's what Gtown does. I think GW does something similar? I was appalled at the number of DC-area schools that don't automatically guarantee funding to their admitted students.

 

Yep, Gtown and GW both are among the worst offenders in this regard. They don't even try to fund everyone!

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Some of those funding issues at GW and G'Town are the result of them being in a city where a handful of organizations are willing to fund students before they return back to government or the military. Conventional wisdom is that you personally should never pay to get a PhD, the ROI just isn't there. However, if work is willing to do it, then accepting an unfunded offer is much, much easier to do. Still, for those of us without independent wealth or someone else picking up the tab, those unfunded offers are just killer teases...

 

Once again edited for terrible spelling

Edited by washington1985
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