Jump to content
NavyMom

Older students?

Recommended Posts

Final grades posted - 1 Pass and 2 A's (although I think one A was a just barely, the other one was very solid).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Final grades posted - 1 Pass and 2 A's (although I think one A was a just barely, the other one was very solid).

 

Congrats!!!! I bet you are happy to be done!  Ready for spring?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm Shana. 31. Graduated this year with a masters in General Psychology. My undergrad was in education, and I'm on year 8 of being a high school psychology teacher. I wanted to get a PhD, but didn't think I would be a viable candidate in the extremely competitive Social Psychology subfield. The masters program was, luckily for me, only evenings, so I completed it after school for the past 3 years, with the last year going part-time teaching.

I applied to PhD programs last year and got rejected from EVERY school I applied to. I'm trying again this year. Luckily, my husband is willing to pick up and move anywhere depending on which program might accept me and offer me a decent financial package, and we have no interest in children besides our 2 dogs.

After being surrounded with young students all day in an instructional role, I hope I wouldn't end up too "preachy" to other graduate students I was technically on equal footing with in a doctoral program because they were younger- and I kind of have a habit of teaching...

(Glad to have found this thread the second time around. I'll definitely be prouder of my mature self in February when interviewing, rather than feeling insecure about lacking research experience like my psych undergrad counterparts.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just about ready for spring, all I really need to do is write the check for the bill.

 

Ugh. I don't even want to look at what I owe so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh. I don't even want to look at what I owe so far.

Not worried about that, full time employee of the university = free tuition for me (undergrad & grad) and my kids (undergrad only)  just need to pay the fees. It makes up for the fact that they pay about half of what I was earning the the real corporate world 10 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not worried about that, full time employee of the university = free tuition for me (undergrad & grad) and my kids (undergrad only)  just need to pay the fees. It makes up for the fact that they pay about half of what I was earning the the real corporate world 10 years ago.

 

Oh you are so lucky.  The only thing I have going for me is the fact that I will be working in public sectors... so once I start paying, I only have to for 10 years and I get forgiveness for the rest. Hopefully.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, everyone! Very excited to find a thread like this one. :) I'm a 30-something as well, and will be starting the first year of my counseling grad program this month. Eek! Hope to learn a lot from you "jugglers" here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, everyone! Very excited to find a thread like this one. :) I'm a 30-something as well, and will be starting the first year of my counseling grad program this month. Eek! Hope to learn a lot from you "jugglers" here.

 

Hi Shrinkgirl!  Welcome!

 

I see you are in the mental health field.  Its the field I currently work in, myself.  Good luck on your first semester!!  Keep us posted on how you are doing!  Feel free to add me to your friends list, as well.

:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone!

I'm 27, not old maybe, but It's been 5 years since I finished college and when (if) enrolled I'll have 5 years working.

Somehow I feel rusty in the theory of my field but I feel I have an upper hand in the practical part. Althought theory is probably more important when studying.

Also I'm a little worried about being international, I don't know if I'll keep the pace with the others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooh, an older students thread! It's nice to see so many people who understand the family/school/work/life struggle. I am 32, raising 5 kids between the ages of 5 and 13, and finishing up my senior year of undergrad at one of the Cal States. I am applying to an MSW program for next fall and am starting to really stress about it. I think my stats are pretty strong, but I only applied to one school so that's always a huge risk. Even if I get in there will be juggling the added stresses of school, field work, and trying not to completely neglect my kids during their teenage years. Anyway, best of luck to everyone in their academic and personal pursuits!     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I found helpful when I was finishing my undergrad, was to involve my kids in some of the activities that happen on campus over the weekends - there is usually some sort of event that is kid friendly.

 

This way they were able to see where dad was at night, it also encouraged my teenaged (at the time) daughter to go to the same school - she is now in the process of applying to grad schools also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooh, an older students thread! It's nice to see so many people who understand the family/school/work/life struggle. I am 32, raising 5 kids between the ages of 5 and 13, and finishing up my senior year of undergrad at one of the Cal States. I am applying to an MSW program for next fall and am starting to really stress about it. I think my stats are pretty strong, but I only applied to one school so that's always a huge risk. Even if I get in there will be juggling the added stresses of school, field work, and trying not to completely neglect my kids during their teenage years. Anyway, best of luck to everyone in their academic and personal pursuits!     

 

 

Hello everyone!

I'm 27, not old maybe, but It's been 5 years since I finished college and when (if) enrolled I'll have 5 years working.

Somehow I feel rusty in the theory of my field but I feel I have an upper hand in the practical part. Althought theory is probably more important when studying.

Also I'm a little worried about being international, I don't know if I'll keep the pace with the others.

 

Thanks, Navy Mom! I'm adding you now. :D 

 

So glad to see others chiming in! Niffler: 32, 5 kids, and finishing up undergrad with plans for grad school--I'm in total awe of you. You're an amazing role model for your kids (something I try to tell myself when I feel overwhelmed, haha). 

 

And hola to GeoMex! Are you applying to US grad schools? I understand the trepidation about keeping pace as an international student. I moved to the US when I was 15, and it was a really tough adjustment, but everyone was extremely friendly. I've also more recently had family move to the US to do grad school and everyone has said that academia is one of the best places to be as an international person...people are generally very welcoming and helpful!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Navy Mom! I'm adding you now. :D

 

So glad to see others chiming in! Niffler: 32, 5 kids, and finishing up undergrad with plans for grad school--I'm in total awe of you. You're an amazing role model for your kids (something I try to tell myself when I feel overwhelmed, haha). 

 

And hola to GeoMex! Are you applying to US grad schools? I understand the trepidation about keeping pace as an international student. I moved to the US when I was 15, and it was a really tough adjustment, but everyone was extremely friendly. I've also more recently had family move to the US to do grad school and everyone has said that academia is one of the best places to be as an international person...people are generally very welcoming and helpful!

 

Yes, I'm applying to US grad schools. I'm aware of how friendly US Americans are, however my concern is towards academics and adjustment to the city and its ways.

Your comment about your experience calms me, I'm sure it will be a great experience and hopefully I'll accomplish my goals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'm applying to US grad schools. I'm aware of how friendly US Americans are, however my concern is towards academics and adjustment to the city and its ways.

Your comment about your experience calms me, I'm sure it will be a great experience and hopefully I'll accomplish my goals.

 

I agree with shrinkgirl... I believe your experience will be amazing.  In my own observations as an American, I have had nothing but respect and admiration for those who want to better themselves through academics, and work hard to achieve their goals.  I have friends of many different nationalities, and I love learning about their heritage and customs. I know there are others like me who only want to help you, and encourage you to succeed in whatever it is that you are doing.  

Good luck on getting acceptance letters, and keep us informed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with shrinkgirl... I believe your experience will be amazing.  In my own observations as an American, I have had nothing but respect and admiration for those who want to better themselves through academics, and work hard to achieve their goals.  I have friends of many different nationalities, and I love learning about their heritage and customs. I know there are others like me who only want to help you, and encourage you to succeed in whatever it is that you are doing.  

Good luck on getting acceptance letters, and keep us informed!

 

Thank you for your kind words, it really is heartwarming to read them. 

Thank you also for the good wishes, and I will post as I get the information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi GeoMex - Come on, the US is a great place to study, don't worry about keeping up, that won't be a problem. ¡No te hagas bolas con las ansiedades!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi GeoMex - Come on, the US is a great place to study, don't worry about keeping up, that won't be a problem. ¡No te hagas bolas con las ansiedades!

 

Lol, I know it's a great place, that's why I applied there :P.

I see your PhD worked great for you ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey fellow students...

 

If you all want to chat, they created an off-site chat room if you are interested.

 

Just go:

 

http://client00.chat.mibbit.com/

rizon[webirc]

username (create one)

#gradchat

 

Awesome! I'll have to check it out when I get home. Thanks, Navy Mom. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Officially saying hello to my "older" friends.

I'm excited that it's 2015. After two years of thinking, debating, and planning, I'll apply to Ph.D. programs this fall -- the same time that I turn 39.  It's been 10 years since I finished my masters, and 16 since I finished my bachelors. For the past year I've been taking a couple of online courses at the university I hope to get my PhD from. I've been pleasantly surprised by how much I've enjoyed the classes and homework! I'm now certain that I can commit the the PhD journey.

What's giving me some anxiety is how much technology has changed how students work. I'm learning about Mendeley and Workflowy now. I can see that tools like this will be extremely helpful, but in the meantime I'm struggling to get caught up and learn what the 20-somethings in my classes seen to know intuitively. 

And the GRE.....whoa. I'm having to relearn so much of the math, which is humbling since I know a great deal of is it taught at the advanced high school or early undergrad levels. I can successfully run a nonprofit healthcare organization and lead 22 staff, but the rules of algebra? I'm lost. 

Thanks to all for keeping this thread alive -- it's been one of my favorites on GradCafe so far!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, everyone! 

 

Excited to find a forum/thread that addresses my situation.  I'm about to start my graduate program, an M.S. in counselling psych, and have 80% excitement and 20% nerves/trepidation.  I'm 37, and received my bachelor's degree in 1999.  Since then, my only coursework has been in the form of training for work/continuing ed type stuff, or just classes for fun, not hardcore academic work. I've always been a strong student, but I still have some anxiety about getting back into the swing of things. 

 

I've been a teacher, myself, so I'm not head-in-the-sand about how much technology has changed elements of education...but I've been more on the educator end of that than the student end. A little anxious about that, but I think it'll be fine.  I feel like I've got a lot of advantages as a person starting graduate school in my upper thirties, in that I'm not a parent, and am able to attend full-time without working, so I'll have less to juggle than many at this stage of life. However, I'm also a newlywed (relatively, my husband and I celebrate one year at the end of this month), and starting a family if possible is on our list.  This is a bridge that will be crossed when we get to it, however. 

 

Mostly, I'm just nervous about getting back into student mode.  I've been in the working world from age 23-37, so it will be a switch. But as a person who always treated schooling like it WAS a job, I'm hoping the transition will be easier than I might think.  I'm less worried about relating to younger peers, because I've spent a lot of time in the past seven or eight years working with that cohort, and manage to relate fine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Officially saying hello to my "older" friends.

I'm excited that it's 2015. After two years of thinking, debating, and planning, I'll apply to Ph.D. programs this fall -- the same time that I turn 39.  It's been 10 years since I finished my masters, and 16 since I finished my bachelors. For the past year I've been taking a couple of online courses at the university I hope to get my PhD from. I've been pleasantly surprised by how much I've enjoyed the classes and homework! I'm now certain that I can commit the the PhD journey.

What's giving me some anxiety is how much technology has changed how students work. I'm learning about Mendeley and Workflowy now. I can see that tools like this will be extremely helpful, but in the meantime I'm struggling to get caught up and learn what the 20-somethings in my classes seen to know intuitively. 

And the GRE.....whoa. I'm having to relearn so much of the math, which is humbling since I know a great deal of is it taught at the advanced high school or early undergrad levels. I can successfully run a nonprofit healthcare organization and lead 22 staff, but the rules of algebra? I'm lost. 

Thanks to all for keeping this thread alive -- it's been one of my favorites on GradCafe so far!

 

Hello, everyone! 

 

Excited to find a forum/thread that addresses my situation.  I'm about to start my graduate program, an M.S. in counselling psych, and have 80% excitement and 20% nerves/trepidation.  I'm 37, and received my bachelor's degree in 1999.  Since then, my only coursework has been in the form of training for work/continuing ed type stuff, or just classes for fun, not hardcore academic work. I've always been a strong student, but I still have some anxiety about getting back into the swing of things. 

 

I've been a teacher, myself, so I'm not head-in-the-sand about how much technology has changed elements of education...but I've been more on the educator end of that than the student end. A little anxious about that, but I think it'll be fine.  I feel like I've got a lot of advantages as a person starting graduate school in my upper thirties, in that I'm not a parent, and am able to attend full-time without working, so I'll have less to juggle than many at this stage of life. However, I'm also a newlywed (relatively, my husband and I celebrate one year at the end of this month), and starting a family if possible is on our list.  This is a bridge that will be crossed when we get to it, however. 

 

Mostly, I'm just nervous about getting back into student mode.  I've been in the working world from age 23-37, so it will be a switch. But as a person who always treated schooling like it WAS a job, I'm hoping the transition will be easier than I might think.  I'm less worried about relating to younger peers, because I've spent a lot of time in the past seven or eight years working with that cohort, and manage to relate fine. 

 

 

Welcome!!!! Glad to see you join the family!  I understand your anxiety...I went through that too.  i about to start my second semester now.  The good news, is that once you start, that fear goes away and yoi become more focused on work.,

 

Looking forward to talking more!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, NavyMom. Navy wife, here.

 

I bow to you my dear.  I am a ex-Navy wife and military brat.  Navy blood runs very deep in my family.  My son joined in the summer of 2013.  Very proud of him!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.