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So many of you guys are interested in autism and/or on the spectrum, it makes me so excited!!!!! Those who are interested, please PM me with any questions. The real world speech path arena kind of worries me, because there are just a lot of things that theory doesn't cover, so I'm glad there are more of us going out into it. For instance, I was emailing with a doctoral speech path student who thought children on the spectrum couldn't play pretend/do symbolic play. (False.) And one of the little boy I care for's therapists is expressly interested with autism and credited it with getting her into the world of therapy...yet does the worst job I've seen of anyone working with him. My only thought is that maybe in grad school that you don't get to learn about the autistic perspective? Because that is actually super critical if you're trying to help people on the spectrum. That's the only thing I can think of that would explain the sort of things I'm seeing. But I digress...

Gaby is it weird if I think it's cool that you're PDD-NOS (what I assume you're referring to when you said pervasive disorder)? Lots of my friends are and we tend to bond quite quickly...autism does run in families and I may not quite be on the spectrum myself, but that's only by the slightest of margins (to put it this way, I'm the least typical supposed neurotypical you'll ever meet). I knew there had to be more people on the spectrum on this forum! :D

Haha I don't know. I've actually never thought of it as something cool. When I was a child I had no idea why most of my peers treated me like I was odd (although I did form friendships). I also heard it's genetic and that sounds like a weird realization now because my boyfriend was also diagnosed within the spectrum when he was younger.

I didn't know so many therapists were clueless about autism.

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Hello,

My name is mike and like Sayjo, I am an old married Hag. I am 31 years old and have been married to my smart, beautiful and loving wife for almost 3 1/2 years now. Can you believe that when she started dating me I was not in school, had no job and did not even know what a SLP was!? I credit my wife and her loving example as the reason I have a Bachelors degree today. It was 6 months after we started dating that I got back into school and did not stop for 3 years straight until I got my bachelors degree in Communication Disorders in May, 2013. ( my wife has a bachelors in Biology and finishes her 2nd bachelors in Nursing in August).

Before learning of the SLP profession I had many experiences that prepared me for the profession. After high school I served a 2 year mission for my church(LDS) in Brazil(Goiania to be exact) where I learned Portuguese by total immersion. (Então, eu e a Gaby podemos falar em português e ninguém poderão saber o que estamos dizendo :). Brincadeira! Esse seria mal!) Once I returned home to southern Califonia I was able to pick up Spanish by talking with friends and co-workers since the languages are very similar. I was originally going to be an elementary school teacher because I love kids(I have 30+ nieces and nephews). I eventually learned of a SLP and realized how it fit me even better since it had somewhat to do with languages and still involved working with kids.

Since graduating in May I have been fortunate enough to pick up a part time job in Nuerotherapy, working with kids, teens and adults with ADD, ADHD, Autism, Anxiety Disorder,etc and also a part time job as a SLP(credential waiver) for charter schools in the Los Angeles area.

Just want to add that all of you are great and and are great examples to me and to others with your love and support of each other. I appreciate all of the support and advice! :). I know we will all grow from this crazy application season experience and go on to be great SLP's or whatever other course we may follow in our lives. Good luck to all of you! :).

Oi! Acho que ñao seria boa idea de falar português mas acho que é muito legal que você fale a lingua! Quero fazer a fonoaudiologia com falantes da lingua portuguesa mas não conheço muitas universidades com aulas de fonética em português :/

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Seriously love reading about everyone! This was a great idea. Nobody else at my school is going into SLP so it's great to "meet" some people that are!

My name is Julie, I'm 21 years old and a senior at Duke University. I'm out-of-field, with a major in Linguistics and minors in Spanish and Education. I'm also part of our teacher licensure program, so this semester I have been student teaching a 4th and 5th grade class. I absolutely love the class and the kids, but I also can't wait to start my graduate studies and learn more about SLP. I have babysat since high school and have worked for families with children with Autism and Cerebral Palsy, so my experience with them definitely sparked my interest in this field. I've been a nanny for the same family since I came back from studying abroad in Madrid last semester and I love it - my day are super busy right now between teaching from 8-4 and then working until 7, but it's the kind of busy that is super fulfilling. When I'm not working, I'm spending time with friends - I'm a member of a sorority, ZTA, and have loved the experience throughout college. I also spend time with my boyfriend, who will be moving to Dallas with me when I begin at UT Dallas in May! He is in culinary school at The Art Institute and earning his bahelor's in culinary management, so he is able to transfer from the school here to the same program in Dallas! We are both really excited about this step in our lives/our relationship and can't wait to meet new people! Other interests include reading, crafting, movie watching and amusement parks :)

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It's been so nice to read all of these posts and learn a bit more about you all!

 

Seriously love reading about everyone! This was a great idea. Nobody else at my school is going into SLP so it's great to "meet" some people that are!

I'm a member of a sorority, ZTA, and have loved the experience throughout college.

 

My roommates and most of my friends at Stockton are Zetas as well, Kappa Xi chapter! 

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Então, eu e a Gaby podemos falar em português e ninguém poderão saber o que estamos dizendo :). Brincadeira! Esse seria mal!

 

lol, good thing you were only joking, because as you said yourself, Spanish and Portuguese are similar enough to be easy to learn so I could understand everything you said, haha. I can't speak Portuguese but several times I've been in situations where I've translated for strangers from Portuguese to English (and then the English back to Spanish, which they can understand) and it's always worked. It reminds me of the differences between some of the relatively similar Chinese dialects.

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Haha I don't know. I've actually never thought of it as something cool. When I was a child I had no idea why most of my peers treated me like I was odd (although I did form friendships). I also heard it's genetic and that sounds like a weird realization now because my boyfriend was also diagnosed within the spectrum when he was younger.

I didn't know so many therapists were clueless about autism.

 

 

Yeah, I was actually asking the little boy I care for's speech therapist today what she learned about autism in grad school. Come to find out, and this is to quote her, all they covered was a 'blurb'. Just a little bit like what it looks like and how to diagnose it, and a tiny bit on how to help people with it. But that's it. I think that might help explain why they're clueless.

 

The other thing is, there are a lot of psychological theories about autism that are dead wrong but were really popularized. Like not possessing empathy or not having the ability to do symbolic (read: pretend) play. If you ever meet an autistic person, you'll know that's wrong (as I told the doctoral student, since I'd literally just had a kid on the spectrum playing in the back of my car pretending my clicker from class was a robot, completely unprompted), but if you only know the theory, or if you learn the theory before you meet the person, often times you'll only see what you're expecting to see. Hence the problem with therapists.

 

It probably doesn't feel very cool to you, sorry about that. It feels cool to me because I tend to click with people on the spectrum quickly friendship wise and because I see it as less disorder and more different way of being. Kind of like, I don't know, being introverted. Not a common view in the general population, so I'm going to guess you haven't been exposed before, but it's growing more common.

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Great topic! 

 

Hi everyone, my name is Sweta (it's like sweater just with an 'uhhh' instead of the 'errrr') :) 

 

I'm 23 and am currently a preschool teacher. I did my bachelors at Seton Hall University. While teaching is really rewarding, I wanted to do more and so I decided to go into speech pathology  I wanted to go into speech earlier but decided on finishing my bachelors and going back to school if it was still something I wanted. I've worked a lot with children and adults with special needs over the years before I started teaching and have done a lot of volunteer work at a nursing home on abroad in India so that's where a lot of my passion for going into SLP stems from. 

 

Besides all this, I spend a lot of time reading, painting, or watching stuff on netflix to keep myself from going crazy while waiting for replies! 

 

It's so nice having this forum to let yourself know you're not the only one that's on the brink of losing your mind haha. Good luck to everyone!  :)

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Yeah, I was actually asking the little boy I care for's speech therapist today what she learned about autism in grad school. Come to find out, and this is to quote her, all they covered was a 'blurb'. Just a little bit like what it looks like and how to diagnose it, and a tiny bit on how to help people with it. But that's it. I think that might help explain why they're clueless.

 

The other thing is, there are a lot of psychological theories about autism that are dead wrong but were really popularized. Like not possessing empathy or not having the ability to do symbolic (read: pretend) play. If you ever meet an autistic person, you'll know that's wrong (as I told the doctoral student, since I'd literally just had a kid on the spectrum playing in the back of my car pretending my clicker from class was a robot, completely unprompted), but if you only know the theory, or if you learn the theory before you meet the person, often times you'll only see what you're expecting to see. Hence the problem with therapists.

 

It probably doesn't feel very cool to you, sorry about that. It feels cool to me because I tend to click with people on the spectrum quickly friendship wise and because I see it as less disorder and more different way of being. Kind of like, I don't know, being introverted. Not a common view in the general population, so I'm going to guess you haven't been exposed before, but it's growing more common.

 

Don't feel bad about it :P I meant that I haven't thought about it that way in a positive way. During my developmental psychology course I actually was taught those things too. I was also taught that people in the spectrum can't relate to other people or have a hard time doing so. I can't say that's true because I can relate to other people and I've known others in the spectrum who can. Mythbusting feels empowering, doesn't it? :D Yet the battle against these misconceptions continue.

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I love this thread! What an awesome way to ease our anxieties and get to know one another  :)

 

Hi everyone! My name is Mina (like the actress Mina Suvari) and I'm born n' raised in New York City. I'm 27 years old. My undergrad is in Communication and Media Studies from Fordham University. I graduated with an entirely different path in mind after interning within the media and worked in book publishing for a while until I discovered Speech through a manuscript I was editing. I took a course in Speech at a nearby school to see how I would feel about it and loved it! So I continued and took a few more pre-reqs. Eventually I left the publishing world and pursued Speech more actively. Since then I have had experience volunteering in the speech department at a nursing facility, a private sensory therapy clinic for children, I worked as a teaching assistant at a public school and this past year I have been an assistant teacher for kids at a private school with learning disabilities. My current position has been immensely challenging BUT I can't believe the amount of experience I have gained. I never thought I would end up in a teaching role but here I am and It's been a blessing! I've been trying to get into a masters program for 3 long years. It's been a rough journey but this time around I finally have one acceptance to a school so hooray!!! I am hoping for more so that I at least have a local option too. My goals are to eventually work as an SLP in a school similar to the one I am at now. I love the community schools represent :) On a more personal level, I'm fluent in Arabic and have a strong passion for the Middle East, which is where my roots are and my heart is <3. My dreams would be to take my speech degree and eventually work in the Middle East to help kids who don't have access to therapy. Fun fact: I'm obsessed with the Lifetime channel and am anxiously waiting for the shows Devious Maids and The Client List to start up again with new seasons!!!

 

Who's up next?! Let's keep this rolling!

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Hey everyone!

 

My name is Christina, and I'm 22 years old. I was born in Connecticut, raised in Carmel, Indiana, and have lived in St. Louis for the past 3.5 years while pursuing my bachelor's  in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Saint Louis University (SLU). I originally chose SLU because I was given a provisional seat in the medical school, but soon after starting college I met an SLP who changed everything. I withdrew my seat from the medical school, signed up for CSD classes two months into college, and have not regretted my decision once! I am very interested in dysphagia and neurogenics/aphasia/TBI etc. (med oriented part of me which never left), but I also have been conducting research with school-age children on the spectrum for the past year and a half and absolutely love that population as well! I'm definitely one who loves it all. I am working with a school-age client with PDD-NOS and CAS for my first clinical experience this semester, and I can't believe how much I have learned from her and my graduate student peer through just a few short months! 

 

Random fun facts-I am involved with a dance group on campus and work with SLU Dance Marathon, an event which raises funds and awareness Children's Miracle Network Hospitals. I also love Icelandic music! I could not identify one morpheme of Icelandic, but I just happen to really enjoy the Icelandic music I come across. Sigur Ros is one of my favorites! I also am really appreciative for a forum such as this. It's so refreshing to know that I'm not actually crazy and there are so many other supportive and empathetic people as we all go through this exciting and pivotal time!

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Don't feel bad about it :P I meant that I haven't thought about it that way in a positive way. During my developmental psychology course I actually was taught those things too. I was also taught that people in the spectrum can't relate to other people or have a hard time doing so. I can't say that's true because I can relate to other people and I've known others in the spectrum who can. Mythbusting feels empowering, doesn't it? :D Yet the battle against these misconceptions continue.

 

I love mythbusting, actually. One of my favorite things to do. :D :D :D ...I just wish it didn't need doing.

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Allow me to re-introduce myself...(I so badly want to break off into a Jay Z voice and sing PSA every time I say that)loll

 

Ok ok...Hello everyone my name is Tatiana, (tiana for short), I got my Bachelor's in CSD from Queen's College last year. I'm 23 years old, Colombian, Guatemalan, and Chinese but I am heavily influenced by American culture. I'm a first generation here, but my parents came here when they were 5 and therefore have no accent but are bilingual themselves. Their interests such as music and comics have influenced my creativity giving me a pretty laid back attitude. Along with my American pride, I do have my Latina pride as well and it shows when I order the good stuff (aka FOOD) loll. My Colombian grandfather pokes fun at me whenever he sees me stressing about Grad school, he says, "American girl not living American girl dream." lmaoo moments like that ease my tension and remind me that rejection is not the end of the world. I was always surrounded by speech therapists because my mother would force me to tag along with my brother making sure that he paid attention to the speech therapists. I was to report back any bad behavior..loll...Since then I have been interested in Speech but never knew what specialty I wanted to get into to. It wasn't until I started tutoring after quitting a bakery job that I obtained my first student. Emy was this shy thing that only spoke if she was told too, she was a 2nd grader when her parents told me she had a learning disability. I never knew what that entailed, I figured she learned just the same way as everybody did but then it became clear after each session, Emy would miss something even though it seemed like she knew it. I would explain X, Y, Z and she would know X and Z but always miss Y. The more that teachers wanted to put her in Special Ed, the more I felt she just needed resource room but it really wasn't her fault. She has a dad that works like a dog and a mother that is hearing impaired. Emy was a puzzle child that just needed to be solved and I took on the challenge to find her learning strategy and sometimes we get it, sometimes we don't. There is even more pressure on the New York State Tests since they have been changed and are more difficult but each year we've made it through the year. I like to work with children that have learning disabilities because I see their potential when others don't. When some teachers complain how much they lag their classroom, I'm the one that reminds them that they're still kids and that they're working as hard as they can. I remind the teachers, they are not a number but just a kid looking to please their parents and authorities because it's those kids that need the most confidence. I love working with them, they make me laugh and smile even when I get shitty days like rejections from school. It seems so illogical to say but I don't want to leave them when I go to grad school, I constantly worry about the next thing that will deter their confidence or the next test that will tell them they're not good enough. I don't want that at all, so I try to make the best of the time we have now so I know I left them somewhat prepared. I love them...like they were my own kids.

Edited by LDadvocate
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My name is Michelle. I'm 22 and currently finishing up my undergraduate BA in Communication Sciences and Disorders at Harding University. It's a private Christian college and I love it. I'm currently in my third semester of clinic (our program has that) and it means I'm gone all day Tuesday/Thursday doing therapy at a local school-I have 18 clients! I'm interested most definitely in autism, but honestly I really am amazed by phonological processes and if I could, I would do diagnostic assessments all day, every day. I discovered this field when an SLP spoke to my education class (freshman year I was a music ed. major) and began pursuing this field. I really hope to get into a school in Michigan, where I've got a very close family. My dream is to also become certified in ABA. In my spare time (the little that I have) I like to watch shows on Netflix, go to the gym, cook, and of course-go to church(where I am actively involved). If I don't get into graduate school this time around, I am seriously contemplating going down to Ecuador for a year to intern at the Hacienda of Hope and help teach English in their academy before considering reapplying.

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It seems so illogical to say but I don't want to leave them when I go to grad school, I constantly worry about the next thing that will deter their confidence or the next test that will tell them they're not good enough. I don't want that at all, so I try to make the best of the time we have now so I know I left them somewhat prepared. I love them...like they were my own kids.

 

I so get that. I feel so bad about leaving the kids I've cared for over the years behind. When I broke the news to one of them about graduate school, he was asking me, couldn't I just come visit every weekend? It was heart wrenching because I had to explain that's a little too far to travel. And I haven't even told the other children I've cared for yet (I've done a lot of babysitting over the years for kids on the spectrum). It's not going to be easy...

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Hi everyone! I love that this field brings such diverse people together from so many different areas, backgrounds, and talents!

 

My name is Rachel, and I'm from Florida. I'm 25 years old, so I'm right there in the middle as far as age goes. I grew up in Northwest Florida (Panama City/Pensacola area; beautiful beaches, but pretty boring) and went to undergraduate at the University of Central Florida. I originally wanted to study Spanish and Italian, but got counseled into Communication Sciences and Disorders and realized it was a much better fit. I decided to get a minor in Spanish, but my favorite Spanish professor ended up doing a study abroad in Spain midway through my degree. I went, and after that, he told me I only needed five more classes to double major, so I thought it would be stupid not to. :)

 

After college, I moved to Houston, Texas to be closer to my family and seek better job opportunities (Florida's economy isn't so hot). I worked as a high school Spanish teacher at a private school for 8 months and then went to Spain for 4 months to teach English. After returning, I got a job as a bilingual speech language pathology assistant in a home health agency with a generous family business who taught me a lot. My contract recently ended. Home health took its toll, so I'm working out of the field (I can't get a job without a one-year contract, and I start grad school in August) to earn some money before grad school.

 

My interests are in bilingualism, second-language acquisition, literacy, reading and writing disorders, child language, accent modification, and phonological processes (in Spanish and English). I'm considering doing my PhD but I haven't decided 100% yet. 

 

I got accepted into Texas Christian University's bilingual program (dream school!), but I also really like Texas State's program, so I'm waiting it out to see if I get a response. 

 

I'm so grateful to this community! There are so many dedicated, intelligent, talented people, and I know everyone here is destined for greatness! :)

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I LOVE hearing about you guys! It's great to hear from people that have the same SLP passion, but have different backgrounds and different specific interests within the field!

 

My name is Ayelet (/aɪɛlɛt/ or "eye-YELL-et").  I'm 22 years old and graduated from SUNY Binghamton with a double major in psychology and linguistics. I am currently living back at home in MA, and have been taking prerequisite CSD classes online.  I initially started on a pre-med track with a music minor, but I fell in love with a linguistics after taking a structural linguistics course and decided that I really wanted to incorporate my passions for the brain and language into a healthcare career.  Because of time and scheduling issues, I couldn't continue with my academic music study, but music is a huge part of my life. I play violin/fiddle (mainly Celtic but I've been dabbling in other styles) and a few other instruments, and I was active in a composers' orchestra (we wrote everything we performed!) as an undergrad.  I'd say outside of SLP, ethnomusicology is one of my absolute biggest passions.

 

The only sort of experience I have so far in a language-focused setting was as an assistant in an ESL speaking skills class, where the students spoke mainly Chinese or Korean as their native languages.

 

Within SLP, my main interests are aphasia rehab and research, adult neurogenic disorders, psycholinguistics, sign languages (though unfortunately I have NO experience except for some research reviews), bimodal bilingualism, and possible connections between music and language in the brain as well as music-based speech/language therapies.

 

Glad to be part of this awesome community!

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This is a great forum with a strong sense of community. It dawned on me today that although we seem to be developing e-friendships, I don't even know some of your first names. This thread will allow us to get to know one another beyond our mutual passion for speech-language pathology.

 

My name is Amanda and I am twenty-one years old. I was born and raised in Central New Jersey. For the first two years of my collegiate career, I attended Montclair State University as an English major with the intention of applying to the teacher education program. After my sophomore year, I transferred to the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey to major in communication disorders and minor in holistic health. When I am not in class, I enjoy working as a substitute teacher. My hobbies include sports, history, alternative/indie music, and traveling. My favorite teams are the New Jersey Devils, the New York Mets, and the New York Giants. My favorite destinations are Newport, Rhode Island and the Outer Banks, North Carolina. One fun fact about me is that my cousin Rene Gagnon was one of the Iwo Jima flag raisers during WWII.

 

I hope to have the opportunity to meet some of you in the future! If you have any lingering questions, feel free to ask!

 

:)

 

Amanda, this is a great thread! I'm new to the forum and haven't really had a chance to get to know too many handles yet, but it's really nice to see what looks like such a supportive online community.

 

I'm Mike, and I grew up on Long Island. I'm 31 (yikes!) and this is my second go around in college after getting my first degree from Syracuse in broadcast journalism. I've worked as a sports play-by-play announcer for the past 9 years (still working) and went back for my undergrad prereqs when I decided to pursue speech. At the time, I was just looking for a change and was hoping this was it, but I've been in love with the field since my first day of classes, and now I can't wait to become a full-fledged SLP! Starting grad school in the Fall, and hoping to stay where I am now, so fingers crossed. Very lucky that I already have options either way.

 

Look forward to hearing from more of you, and best of luck to everyone!!!

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Hello Everyone!!

 

I've really enjoyed learning more about you all and your interests. There are good people coming into the realm of SLP and I wish the best to you all in your endeavors!! :D

 

My name is Quinn, (oops! I didn't use a pseudo name for my account), and I am 25 years old. I studied Anthropology and Neuroscience at Loyola U in Chicago and discovered SLP along the way. I like to think of myself as someone who does not scare easily, but applications do terrify me. That being said, I finally mustered up the courage to apply :D (good since I may have to do it again! - I understand many on this forum have applied multiple times).

 

Since graduating from Loyola, I moved back to Dallas where I am originally from, and I juggle a lot of odd jobs- mostly in child care working as a nanny. I enjoy swimming and I just started some yoga. I love to travel and would love to do more- most family summers were spent backpacking in Colorado and New Mexico. I studied abroad in Ireland (so beautiful!), and visited some of Scotland <3 and France. Learning about other cultures, people and places is so much fun! In college, I did some work with a refugee organization that paired me with a Bhutanese family, and we still keep in touch today, which is difficult considering the distance and language barrier! Also in college, I worked as a lifeguard at YMCA and ironically, the only time I've had to provide CPR was not at the pool, but at a church while visiting family. 

 

@Creigh and Mari - I am totally with you on being irritated when people use the "r" word offensively. I try to point it out in a way that doesn't in turn shame the offender(s) because usually their use of the word is due to their own lack of experience with downs syndrome and therefore an impersonalized and uneducated idea of what it means... no excuse really, but I want to give them the benefit of doubt and a chance to understand first. Still, I usually end up with dirty looks and am also called a PC police... Glad to know there are more of us out there trying to change this!

 

@Karissa - I think we have some common experiences :) I also started babysitting at age 11 and feel as though I have helped raise so many children, (I hope that doesn't sound too presumptuous, but it really can feel that way with how much parents can come to rely on us). Its been a wonderful experience, and I can hardly believe that some of those kids are starting college now! Many of my friends live far away too so I can relate to your pro/con description. 

 

@Ben - you're a harpist!?! That's awesome!! There are so few! I wish I could say I played too, but its always just been an idea of mine. How did you get started? 

@Ayelet - I bet you will offer amazing music/slp therapy sessions!! I am also interested in brain/language/music connections. I too want to learn more on sign language as I don't have much experience either. The music is more of an appreciation I have since Im not a musician. I have a violin, but I have to admit that I haven't had lessons since middle school so I'm not very good- but Iove it anyway :D

Edited by *Quinn*
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Oh wow, there are so many interesting people in this forum! 

 

@Ayelet - What a pretty name!  I never heard of it before!  It's cool meeting people with unique names like that.  What does the name mean?  I'm jealous you have such passion for music.  I used to take piano lessons as a child, but I stopped playing a few years ago due to college and lost of interest.  I can still play pieces, but I don't have the creativity to compose music and I never received ear training. 

 

I don't feel too comfortable revealing personal information, so you can call me Ollie as a nickname.  I feel so young compared to most of you guys as I will turn 21 in two weeks!  I'm a second generation Vietnamese-American and I would like to try food from different cultures.  I still love Asian food though <3 

 

I like to draw, write stories, and play video games.  I don't own a lot of video games, but I have completed the ones I have and appreciate the story telling from them.  I have only traveled to a few states (Nevada, Hawaii, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Arizona) and to a couple of provinces in Canada (Ontario and Quebec), but I would love to be able to travel to other parts of the world one day when I have a career.  If I could do anything before grad school, I would like to go on a road trip through the USA and enjoy awesome food and scenic places.   

 

I started out as a biology major at CSULB (Cal State Long Beach) for the pre-pharmacy route, but I soon found out that chemistry isn't my forte and it gave me personal problems too :( .  I have a low functioning autistic brother who receives therapy of many kinds (speech, occupational, physical, etc.).  Most of my childhood was spent studying and looking after my brother when my parents are busy. 

 

My mom tried to introduce me to speech therapy in the summer before my undergrad program started, but I had no interest at the time because it was a hot summer day and I thought pharmacy was for me at the time.  I gave the career option another chance when I came to one of my brother's speech therapy later that year.  I soon found myself coming back to watch my brother's therapy sessions and found that I enjoyed the idea of helping children improve their speech, similar to a teacher.  I talked to his speech pathologist to find out more about the career and later went home to research into it.  I switched my major from biology to communicative disorders and I don't regret it :D

 

I plan to graduate from CSULB for spring 2015 and I'm hoping that I will be accepted for any grad program in the United States.  I want to go out of state so I can experience life outside of California and meet new people along the way.  I spent 3 years volunteering at a local hospital for the pediatrics section by running errands for the nurses and playing with the children.  I also volunteer at a private clinic with a speech pathologist and I was an active Red Cross member for about 2 years.  I still look after my autistic brother and I'm interested in learning more about autism from my major.    

Edited by rainsonata
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Hi! I'm Molly and I'm 20 years old. I'm a senior at Western Washington in Bellingham, WA. I'm majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders and minoring in Linguistics. Graduating in June, aaahhh! I'm graduating so young because I did the running start program in high school - a WA program where you can take classes at a local community college while you're in high school for dual college+high school credit. So I earned my 2-year transfer degree at the same time I graduated high school. It was pretty overwhelming to get right into the CSD program during my first quarter at "real" college! I think I'd like to become a school-based SLP. I think I'd like working at a middle or high school especially. I'm currently waiting to hear back from the two grad schools I applied to and the wait is driving me insane! Interests include traveling (I haven't really traveled anywhere but I REALLY want to), photography, writing, watching tv (obsessively), and indiefolk/alternativey music. 

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@Creigh and Mari - I am totally with you on being irritated when people use the "r" word offensively. I try to point it out in a way that doesn't in turn shame the offender(s) because usually their use of the word is due to their own lack of experience with downs syndrome and therefore an impersonalized and uneducated idea of what it means... no excuse really, but I want to give them the benefit of doubt and a chance to understand first. Still, I usually end up with dirty looks and am also called a PC police... Glad to know there are more of us out there trying to change this!

 

Quinn, I try. But it's just SO hard to ease into and do in a way where the person doesn't feel defensive. I called out someone online recently for using the word retarded and this is the response I got from a bystander of the conversation - it was so disheartening.

 

 

Used in slang as an insult it is not meant to insult that real group of people but rather the non retarded person who it is directed at. Being offended by its use is also ones own choice. Almost any insult can be traced to its origin, tied to a specific group and then decided on as offensive. That is in fact why its being used as an insult. I think the sensitivity you have shown is probably only geared toward this specific group you have ties to and not across the board on insults. I think you are being overly sensitive and wonder if you applied this same attitude across the board with everything written and said how you would manage to go 5 minutes without being offended. 

I'd say chill out and continue your good work with autistic people. BTW I am equal opportunity for all groups so we wouldn't want to deny one there slang offensive insult over another then we may be leaving them out. I am also not against retarded, slow or autistic people.

 

It's just ridiculous the kind of backlash and defensiveness that's out there - I wasn't even talking to this person and they got offended!!!! It's just really frustrating. :(  Glad to know there are other advocates out there.

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@Quinn - Thank you!  I haven't had a lot of actual music lessons either, so my formal technique isn't that great.  It's so cool that you studied abroad in Ireland!  I went to Scotland with some friends, and I had a blast playing music at the pub sessions! :)

 

@rainsonata - Thanks!! :)  I actually mistyped the IPA, but by the time I noticed it was too late for me to edit it.  (It should be /aɪjɛlɛt/.  I know it probably doesn't matter but it's been driving me crazy!)  It means "gazelle" in Hebrew (though it can also mean "morning star" in a more poetic context).  As for the music - I truly believe that it's never too late to start composing.  It doesn't have to always be a complex symphonic arrangement that comes to you instantaneously.  Some of my favorite pieces came about by just literally poking around at the keys for a while. :)  Also - I have to say - I love your username!!

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@Quinn - Thank you!  I haven't had a lot of actual music lessons either, so my formal technique isn't that great.  It's so cool that you studied abroad in Ireland!  I went to Scotland with some friends, and I had a blast playing music at the pub sessions! :)

 

@rainsonata - Thanks!! :)  I actually mistyped the IPA, but by the time I noticed it was too late for me to edit it.  (It should be /aɪjɛlɛt/.  I know it probably doesn't matter but it's been driving me crazy!)  It means "gazelle" in Hebrew (though it can also mean "morning star" in a more poetic context).  As for the music - I truly believe that it's never too late to start composing.  It doesn't have to always be a complex symphonic arrangement that comes to you instantaneously.  Some of my favorite pieces came about by just literally poking around at the keys for a while. :)  Also - I have to say - I love your username!!

Ha ha, I had this username for a few years since maybe high school.  I like to use it for other websites as a default username because I'm born in April (when it rains, not that it really rains much in California) and sonata because of my music background.  The name just stuck to me because it had a nice sound to it, pun not intended.  My urge to play the piano tends to come and go, usually when I'm left alone and my mind starts to ponder off somewhere. 

 

I want to look at some certified grad programs for speech pathology that focuses on autism, school age children/adolescence development, and maybe AAC.  Does anyone know any good programs that may concentrate on any of those topics?  I haven't taken a course in AAC yet, but my autistic brother uses an electronic device that helps him communicate, so AAC fascinates me.  I want to either work in a school setting or at a private clinic, I'm not sure which at the moment. 

 

I want to work with school age children around the age of eight/nine years old or above.  I'm not sure why, but I like to talk to kids of that age.  Maybe it's because it's the time when they're old enough to start thinking on their own and question things.  I tell people I think middle schoolers are annoying, yet I always end up talking to them and helping them out in academics.  Maybe it's because of their attitude that makes things interesting, lol.  I can't say much about high schoolers because they're too close to me in age for me to really see a big difference.   

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Ha ha, I had this username for a few years since maybe high school.  I like to use it for other websites as a default username because I'm born in April (when it rains, not that it really rains much in California) and sonata because of my music background.  The name just stuck to me because it had a nice sound to it, pun not intended.  My urge to play the piano tends to come and go, usually when I'm left alone and my mind starts to ponder off somewhere. 

 

I want to look at some certified grad programs for speech pathology that focuses on autism, school age children/adolescence development, and maybe AAC.  Does anyone know any good programs that may concentrate on any of those topics?  I haven't taken a course in AAC yet, but my autistic brother uses an electronic device that helps him communicate, so AAC fascinates me.  I want to either work in a school setting or at a private clinic, I'm not sure which at the moment. 

 

I want to work with school age children around the age of eight/nine years old or above.  I'm not sure why, but I like to talk to kids of that age.  Maybe it's because it's the time when they're old enough to start thinking on their own and question things.  I tell people I think middle schoolers are annoying, yet I always end up talking to them and helping them out in academics.  Maybe it's because of their attitude that makes things interesting, lol.  I can't say much about high schoolers because they're too close to me in age for me to really see a big difference.   

 

I specifically chose schools based on which ones have good autism programs. FSU was the best one I found (which is why I'm so excited to be going!!!). :)

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