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MMRS218

University of New Mexico-what's the deal?

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I've been accepted to UNM, but read nothing but poor reviews on here. Can anyone share more specifics about their experience?

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I'm currently a non-degree student here at UNM. I started in fall of 2012. I got my BA in psychology at UNM, which was great-the faculty are nothing but friendly and supportive of all students. So naturally I expected that when I started as a non-degree, but not really what I experienced. The department is small and it's not a very harmonious department. Some of the faculty members don't get along well with each other and will occasionally gossip about each other during class. Also, certain students are very clearly favored over others. It's a very competitive atmosphere so there's a lot of cliques among the students. Considering how stressful grad school is, especially when studying speech pathology, it seems important that the department would be supportive of its students but at UNM, that's definitely few-and-far between.

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sarahsahara, so are you currently doing your leveling coursework or actually in the graduate program?

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I'm finishing up my leveling courses but most of the "graduate" courses are combined with undergraduates. I think that may be why so many issues come up because the classes are so large ~ 100 people in a class and there's a lot of tension between the undergrads and the grads. There's been a lot of reshuffling too so the faculty availble to teach class is limited and the professors that are available are stretched pretty thin.

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I'm finishing up my leveling courses but most of the "graduate" courses are combined with undergraduates. I think that may be why so many issues come up because the classes are so large ~ 100 people in a class and there's a lot of tension between the undergrads and the grads. There's been a lot of reshuffling too so the faculty availble to teach class is limited and the professors that are available are stretched pretty thin.

Grad courses are combined with undergrads? Wow. Do undergrads get to participate in clinic, too? 

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Grad courses are combined with undergrads? Wow. Do undergrads get to participate in clinic, too?

Not to my knowledge but the non-degree program is a little different from the undergrad so I'm not entirely sure. For example, it's mostly graduate students who participate in research labs. Favored undergrads can also. But non-degrees aren't usually allowed/chosen to participate. Maybe that's just how speech programs work though? For my psych degree I was required to do research in a lab in order to get my degree so I guess I was a little surprised how strict it is in the SHS department.

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Not to my knowledge but the non-degree program is a little different from the undergrad so I'm not entirely sure. For example, it's mostly graduate students who participate in research labs. Favored undergrads can also. But non-degrees aren't usually allowed/chosen to participate. Maybe that's just how speech programs work though? For my psych degree I was required to do research in a lab in order to get my degree so I guess I was a little surprised how strict it is in the SHS department.

What do you mean by labs? Like the bilingual research lab or in clinic? I am a post baccalaureate at my university and unfortunately I don't get to participate in clinic either.

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What do you mean by labs? Like the bilingual research lab or in clinic? I am a post baccalaureate at my university and unfortunately I don't get to participate in clinic either.

Sorry, my last post was kinda confusing. Here is my overall impression of the MS-SLP program at UNM: I think they have some really great opportunities. But, unless you are well-liked in the department, I think it's really difficult to pursue those opportunities. So in terms of being involved in a research lab, it's something I've been trying to due since I started my leveling courses-I've done extensive work and research on ASD and was interested in taking that a step further by looking at AAC and ASD. But I was never successful in this pursuit because students who were well-known/favored got to participate in that research. When I did my 25 pre-clinic observation hours. It was something I had to set up and complete on my own, outside of the department (which was great in getting a better understanding of the areas an SLP can work in). Because the information on doing clinical observations isn't even provided to non-degrees. Coming from out-of-field and trying to establish myself in a new department would have been a better experience if the department was just supportive of all students, regardless of whether they're undergrads, non-degrees, or grads) and just talking to some of my classmates today, it seems that most current UNM students agree with that.

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Hey I go to a different school, but we have leveling/post-baccs here as well. Since they have degrees outside of SLP they need to take classes people usually take in their undergraduate career. This is why sarasahara is in some classes with undergraduate students. It doesn't mean that the undergraduates are taking grad level courses, more like the opposite, the post-baccs are taking undergraduate courses. Correct me if I'm wrong, but leveling/post-baccs don't even get to do clinics yet because they aren't an official grad student either. But undergrads in classes with post-baccs don't get to do clinic (unless the university lets undergrads do that, but most don't). 
Like where I'm going we have post-baccs in some of my classes. Neither groups are doing clinics as we aren't grad students yet. Hope that makes sense!

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Hey I go to a different school, but we have leveling/post-baccs here as well. Since they have degrees outside of SLP they need to take classes people usually take in their undergraduate career. This is why sarasahara is in some classes with undergraduate students. It doesn't mean that the undergraduates are taking grad level courses, more like the opposite, the post-baccs are taking undergraduate courses. Correct me if I'm wrong, but leveling/post-baccs don't even get to do clinics yet because they aren't an official grad student either. But undergrads in classes with post-baccs don't get to do clinic (unless the university lets undergrads do that, but most don't). 

Like where I'm going we have post-baccs in some of my classes. Neither groups are doing clinics as we aren't grad students yet. Hope that makes sense!

Yep, I get what you're saying. At my university, undergrads get to do a bit of clinic (not a ton), but post baccs do not. I guess knowing that undergrads at other universities are in the same boat reassures me a bit! Are you attending UNM?

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And is anyone interested here for the bilingual tract?

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And is anyone interested here for the bilingual tract?

 

I've been accepted to UNM, but read nothing but poor reviews on here. Can anyone share more specifics about their experience?

What specifically have you read, just out of curiosity.  I'm interested in the bilingual Class for All NM and just accepted at UNM last Monday.  To me, they seemed great when I visited.  I'd like to hear more. 

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I've accepted at UNM and am interested in the bilingual track.  I have had a completely, albeit limited, experience with UNM thus far.  They were willing to set up a whole half day of meetings with students, faculty, etc., and tour around the facility.  Interdepartmental discord is, unfortunately, something that happens no matter where you go.  I've only encountered extremely friendly and outgoing professors and clinical supervisors there.  The clinic at UNM is small - there are only a few treatment rooms and there is only one classroom where each cohort in the grad program takes all of their classes.  It seats 30 people.  It sounds like sarahsahara might have mistaken some of the Post Baccs, as another poster mentioned, for actual grad students in her 100+ student classes. 

 

As for a post-bacc/out of major or out of field completing the 25 ASHA hours, that to me doesn't really seem like a program specific difficulty.  Rather, it seems like a requisite that's put forth by ASHA and is kind of difficult for departments to deal with.  At my current University, I'm having a HECK of a time getting observation hours through local SLPs.  I mentioned I'm bilingual, there is a Spanish speaking SLP in the school district in my town, and the principal and asst. prinicpal have made me jump through crazy hoops to get in ($60 fingerprints/criminal bkgrd check, TB test, bloodborne pathogens online module, paperwork, etc.).  Did I mention I'm currently a licensed teacher in Illinois?  

 

Bottom line - I didn't get the same read on things as has been reported here.  Also, no matter where you go to school, there will be positives and negatives.  It's good to keep in mind that your graduate program is often just what you make of it.  It's hard to avoid the "drama," but it's important to do your own thing, try to forge on in your own way, make connections that are meaningful and fruitful, and if professors don't want to work with you, it's probably nothing personal.  They're busy people and are trying to balance getting manuscripts published, working with UGs and Grads, supervising, etc., etc.  There is someone/something out there for everyone, so just keep looking! :) 

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I've accepted at UNM and am interested in the bilingual track. I have had a completely, albeit limited, experience with UNM thus far. They were willing to set up a whole half day of meetings with students, faculty, etc., and tour around the facility. Interdepartmental discord is, unfortunately, something that happens no matter where you go. I've only encountered extremely friendly and outgoing professors and clinical supervisors there. The clinic at UNM is small - there are only a few treatment rooms and there is only one classroom where each cohort in the grad program takes all of their classes. It seats 30 people. It sounds like sarahsahara might have mistaken some of the Post Baccs, as another poster mentioned, for actual grad students in her 100+ student classes.

As for a post-bacc/out of major or out of field completing the 25 ASHA hours, that to me doesn't really seem like a program specific difficulty. Rather, it seems like a requisite that's put forth by ASHA and is kind of difficult for departments to deal with. At my current University, I'm having a HECK of a time getting observation hours through local SLPs. I mentioned I'm bilingual, there is a Spanish speaking SLP in the school district in my town, and the principal and asst. prinicpal have made me jump through crazy hoops to get in ($60 fingerprints/criminal bkgrd check, TB test, bloodborne pathogens online module, paperwork, etc.). Did I mention I'm currently a licensed teacher in Illinois?

Bottom line - I didn't get the same read on things as has been reported here. Also, no matter where you go to school, there will be positives and negatives. It's good to keep in mind that your graduate program is often just what you make of it. It's hard to avoid the "drama," but it's important to do your own thing, try to forge on in your own way, make connections that are meaningful and fruitful, and if professors don't want to work with you, it's probably nothing personal. They're busy people and are trying to balance getting manuscripts published, working with UGs and Grads, supervising, etc., etc. There is someone/something out there for everyone, so just keep looking! :)

No, I didn't mistake post-baccs for grad students. UNM only require 9 credit hours to apply, so a lot of the 1st year grad students either didn't complete certain pre-reqs are maybe the course credit didn't transfer. Whatever the reason, all of my classes this year have been a combination of grad, non-degree, and undergrad students. But I think that can happen no matter where you go.

What I meant about the 25 observation hours was that none of the non-degrees were ever informed that completing those hours in order to start clinicals. I only knew because I had to have them because I was required to complete them for another application.

I definitely agree that education is what you make of it. I got an amazing research offer with my acceptance at UNM but for me fit was really important and just knowing how the department at UNM runs, I didn't feel it was the right fit for me and ended finding a school that seems to fit better!

Edited by sarahsahara

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What specifically have you read, just out of curiosity.  I'm interested in the bilingual Class for All NM and just accepted at UNM last Monday.  To me, they seemed great when I visited.  I'd like to hear more. 

I'm just referring to the reviews on the results board-they all pretty much said the same thing, but not very specific. Really glad to hear you had a good experience when you toured!

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Are you able to visit the school?

Edited by Patont

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I'm just referring to the reviews on the results board-they all pretty much said the same thing, but not very specific. Really glad to hear you had a good experience when you toured!

I've been emailing with several current students at UNM who have been reporting the complete opposite of those poor reviews. I can send you one of the emails I just received, as it was super reassuring and is making me reconsider my hesitation about UNM. Have you made a decision already?

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I've been emailing with several current students at UNM who have been reporting the complete opposite of those poor reviews. I can send you one of the emails I just received, as it was super reassuring and is making me reconsider my hesitation about UNM. Have you made a decision already?

I've accepted-I just wanted to get more specifics because the reviews on the results page were really freakin me out! That would be appreciated, if you can PM me!  :)

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I've accepted-I just wanted to get more specifics because the reviews on the results page were really freakin me out! That would be appreciated, if you can PM me!  :)

I've accepted my offer too!! The results were also worrying me, until I started emailing with the department and students. Couldn't have been nicer and more supportive. I'll send you a personal message.

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Has anyone made a facebook group for UNM 2016? I know there's a general one for Speech & Hearing Sciences, but it'd be cool to have one for recently admitted students who have decided to attend UNM.

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Hi I know this is kind of an old topic but would either MMR218 or danielle90 be willing to give a first-hand update on your UNM experience after your first semester.  Have your experiences been good and did you see any of the negatives the other users posted about?  I know you are both probably very busy in your program but never hurts to ask!

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I've accepted at UNM and am interested in the bilingual track.  I have had a completely, albeit limited, experience with UNM thus far.  They were willing to set up a whole half day of meetings with students, faculty, etc., and tour around the facility.  Interdepartmental discord is, unfortunately, something that happens no matter where you go.  I've only encountered extremely friendly and outgoing professors and clinical supervisors there.  The clinic at UNM is small - there are only a few treatment rooms and there is only one classroom where each cohort in the grad program takes all of their classes.  It seats 30 people.  It sounds like sarahsahara might have mistaken some of the Post Baccs, as another poster mentioned, for actual grad students in her 100+ student classes. 

 

As for a post-bacc/out of major or out of field completing the 25 ASHA hours, that to me doesn't really seem like a program specific difficulty.  Rather, it seems like a requisite that's put forth by ASHA and is kind of difficult for departments to deal with.  At my current University, I'm having a HECK of a time getting observation hours through local SLPs.  I mentioned I'm bilingual, there is a Spanish speaking SLP in the school district in my town, and the principal and asst. prinicpal have made me jump through crazy hoops to get in ($60 fingerprints/criminal bkgrd check, TB test, bloodborne pathogens online module, paperwork, etc.).  Did I mention I'm currently a licensed teacher in Illinois?  

 

Bottom line - I didn't get the same read on things as has been reported here.  Also, no matter where you go to school, there will be positives and negatives.  It's good to keep in mind that your graduate program is often just what you make of it.  It's hard to avoid the "drama," but it's important to do your own thing, try to forge on in your own way, make connections that are meaningful and fruitful, and if professors don't want to work with you, it's probably nothing personal.  They're busy people and are trying to balance getting manuscripts published, working with UGs and Grads, supervising, etc., etc.  There is someone/something out there for everyone, so just keep looking! :)

I have to disagree with the hoops you jumped through being "crazy". As a parent of a preschooler and a second grader, I would expect nothing less of any person who might come into contact with my child. Heck, I'm already jumping through those same hoops and it's just the second semester of my junior year as an SLP major. :)

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Hi I know this is kind of an old topic but would either MMR218 or danielle90 be willing to give a first-hand update on your UNM experience after your first semester.  Have your experiences been good and did you see any of the negatives the other users posted about?  I know you are both probably very busy in your program but never hurts to ask!

I sent you a direct message! Let me know if I can be of any help to you!

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