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Here are some of the most popular St. Louis neighborhoods:

Central West End
Over a century old, the Central West End is chic and full of charm. Stop by antique shops, boutiques and restaurants after exploring the neighborhood’s visitor attractions. Forest Park is on your doorstep with its roster of cultural institutions and acres of green space.

The Central West End is home to the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, one of the largest mosaic collections in the western hemisphere. The Cathedral offers both masses and tours to view its magnificent artistry. The World Chess Hall of Fame offers chess lessons as well as championing St. Louis as a global chess capital. Throughout the year you can also attend the Earth Day Festival and Microfest in Forest Park as well as Bookfest St. Louis, Halloween in the CWE,  and the Greek Festival on Labor Day Weekend. This is also home to WUSTL’s and SLU’s medical campus.

Dogtown
Residents of Dogtown, located south of Forest Park, enjoy easy access to all of the park’s amenities – the free zoo, art museum, history museum, trails for walking and biking, etc.  Proximity to central corridor neighborhoods like Clayton, The Hill, Maplewood, and the CWE, along with easy access to the highway for a quick commute to downtown, put this neighborhood in demand. Dogtown is known for its quaint historic area near the intersection of Clayton and Tamm Avenues, and is home to a large annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, which is the more authentic of the two St. Louis parades for this holiday. Its central location and varied housing stock make it an appealing option.


Lafayette Square
Lafayette Square is small, but one of the most iconic and historic neighborhoods in the city of St. Louis. Along with Central West End, it’s home to some of the city’s most spectacular, expansive homes. As you stroll through 30 acres of greenery in the center of an urban landscape, you can try fantastic food and drinks in the neighborhood’s classy restaurants and bars, stroll through specialty shops and enjoy free concerts during the summer.

Soulard
Just a five minutes’ drive from the Gateway Arch, Soulard is a historic French neighborhood that will charm you with its red-brick townhouses and their balconies, courtyards and blues music scene. Looking for something unique to check out here? Visit the Soulard Farmers Market, open Wednesdays through Saturdays — it has been operating since 1779!
 

The Hill
If you’re looking to settle somewhere with a strong Italian heritage, you’ve come to the right place. This neighborhood is home to a large number of locally renowned Italian-American restaurants, bakeries, grocery stores and bocce gardens. The neighborhood’s narrow streets can get clogged with traffic on weekends, but The Hill is also one of the most walkable, compact areas in St. Louis. And fun fact: Baseball greats Yogi Berra and Joe Garagiola, Sr., both grew up on The Hill!

Chesterfield
Just 30 minutes west of downtown St. Louis, Chesterfield is a peaceful residential area offering beautiful homes and great schools. Known as the “City of Volunteers” due to its citizens’ involvement in helping the city, you’ll find several cultural outlets, historic villages, public parks and community initiatives.

Kirkwood
Known as the queen of the suburbs, Kirkwood’s art, nature and small-town charm make it the perfect neighborhood for families or anyone who wants a quieter life with access to a range of amenities. The area offers an abundance of great schools, churches and family-friendly attractions including parks, farmers’ markets and museums.

The Magic House has been voted the number one children’s museum in the U.S. and offers hundreds of hands-on educational exhibits. Be sure to also check out Laumeier Sculpture Park – a 105-acre park featuring 60 pieces of large-scale outdoor sculptures (and one of the first and largest sculpture parks in the country). The National Museum of Transportation is another nearby attraction that’s a great day out for families.

Clayton
Conveniently located less than 10 miles from downtown St. Louis, Clayton is also the seat of government for St. Louis County. Part of WashU’s campus is also located within Clayton. It’s a lively administrative center, business and financial hub, and the white-collar atmosphere draws in premium boutiques, restaurants, hotels and bars. Enjoy a seasonal farmers market, multiple food festivals and pristine art galleries. The Saint Louis Art Fair, held every September, is rated one of the best in the nation. It attracts more than 150,000 people each year!

Webster Groves
Suburban Webster Groves has a great range of homes at varying prices, some fantastic restaurants and bars, as well as being just a 20-minute drive from downtown St. Louis along Interstate 44. Webster Groves is one of the metro area’s up-and-coming success stories. 

Shaw
If you want an older home, look at this leafy South City neighborhood. Cute corner stores and cafes are one attraction, while nearby Tower Grove Park is a beautiful place to experience St. Louis’ four seasons. The locals here are spoiled for natural beauty: The Botanical Gardens (still known to many locals as Shaw’s Garden, after its founder, Henry Shaw) is a short walk away and a stunning oasis in the city.

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So I grew up in StL. It is a neighborhood-based city, but great number of the metro area which is considered STL lives in the suburbs (50-60s white flight). This is changing to a certain extent, espec

My PI's lab is on Danforth campus so it seems like it would be about a 15 minute bike through Forest Park and worse comes to worse, I can take an uber since the apartment is only 8 min away (according

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On 1/25/2020 at 10:24 AM, Rio20 said:

I'm a Black queer woman who is married to a white brazilian woman. Will we experience racism and homophobia? I live in NYC and I'm from SF, so I'm a little scared.

I lived in St. Louis for six years. I never experienced racism or homophobia. I imagine a lot of it might depend on where you live but I think sticking close to the city will eliminate a lot of that fear. I think you'd be at a higher chance of experiencing racism if you were living 30 minutes or more from St. Louis. I think you'd be safe as long as you were somewhere that was served by either the Metro Buses or MetroLink: https://www.metrostlouis.org/

Another reason I'd advise living close to a bus stop or the Metro is because a lot of the local universities provide a discounted or free metro bus. WashU provides free semester and summer passes. Public Transportation has improved tremendously since when I first started and it isn't perfect but I think it's a better system than most cities of a comparable size. There are some areas it could reach but the areas that are further from it have lobbied against it because they enjoy lighter-foot traffic.

I have found most people to be respectful as long as you're respectful to them.

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Just got accepted to WashU's MSW program. I know it's an amazing school and program but I'm worried about my ability to live in St. Louis. I cannot drive due to how highly epileptic I am so I've always lived places with well developed metro systems/public transits. Does anyone have any experience going to WashU without a car? (or any experience with public transportation in St.L. ). Would I be able to live a decent life or would I be too handicapped? I'm okay with Ubering but I would prefer it not to be a daily thing. 

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On 3/23/2020 at 12:01 PM, bragierrnot said:

Just got accepted to WashU's MSW program.

Congratulations! I've had several friends who graduated from WashU's MSW program and they speak highly of it.

On 3/23/2020 at 12:01 PM, bragierrnot said:

I cannot drive due to how highly epileptic I am so I've always lived places with well developed metro systems/public transits. Does anyone have any experience going to WashU without a car? (or any experience with public transportation in St.L. ). Would I be able to live a decent life or would I be too handicapped? I'm okay with Ubering but I would prefer it not to be a daily thing. 

I made it through St. Louis without driving. And I saw transportation options improve greatly from when I started and when I ended. Washington University provides all of its students with a Metro Transit Pass.  The Metro Transit Pass allows you to ride the buses and light rail in St. Louis. The light rail map can be found here: https://www.metrostlouis.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/MK180468redblueline_update_CORTEX.jpg

The Skinker stop drops you off right by campus as does the University City-Big Bend stop. 

Popular neighborhoods that grad students decide to live in (that also offer easy public transportation options) include:
Central West End
Skinker/DeBaliviere
The Loop/University City
Clayton-Tamm*
Hi-Pointe*
*Clayton-Tamm and Hi-Pointe along with a few other neighborhoods also make up what's known as Dogtown. I think these two neighborhoods are the most bike-friendly and are the closest to the University if one were inclined to walk or bike. There are a lot of great local restaurants in Clayton-Tamm including Nora's which was named one of 33 best sandwich shops in the country by Thrillist.

I lived in different neighborhoods throughout my time in St. Louis and I never felt like I had a need for a car. It might've made certain aspects easier but I think having access to the buses and light rail made a huge difference in my experience. The transportation is significantly better than people tend to give it credit for. Buses run approximately every 30 minutes on the weekdays and the rail runs every 6-10 minutes depending on the time of the day.

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On 3/24/2020 at 9:53 PM, Regimentations said:

Congratulations! I've had several friends who graduated from WashU's MSW program and they speak highly of it.

I made it through St. Louis without driving. And I saw transportation options improve greatly from when I started and when I ended. Washington University provides all of its students with a Metro Transit Pass.  The Metro Transit Pass allows you to ride the buses and light rail in St. Louis. The light rail map can be found here: https://www.metrostlouis.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/MK180468redblueline_update_CORTEX.jpg

The Skinker stop drops you off right by campus as does the University City-Big Bend stop. 

Popular neighborhoods that grad students decide to live in (that also offer easy public transportation options) include:
Central West End
Skinker/DeBaliviere
The Loop/University City
Clayton-Tamm*
Hi-Pointe*
*Clayton-Tamm and Hi-Pointe along with a few other neighborhoods also make up what's known as Dogtown. I think these two neighborhoods are the most bike-friendly and are the closest to the University if one were inclined to walk or bike. There are a lot of great local restaurants in Clayton-Tamm including Nora's which was named one of 33 best sandwich shops in the country by Thrillist.

I lived in different neighborhoods throughout my time in St. Louis and I never felt like I had a need for a car. It might've made certain aspects easier but I think having access to the buses and light rail made a huge difference in my experience. The transportation is significantly better than people tend to give it credit for. Buses run approximately every 30 minutes on the weekdays and the rail runs every 6-10 minutes depending on the time of the day.

I can't thank you enough for your response. I feel a lot better after hearing the honest opinion from someone that has experienced what I would be going through. Now that I know it's doable without sacrificing too much I am seriously considering WUSTL . I'll definitely use your list of neighborhoods when that time come. Thanks for congratulating me on my acceptance! I was shocked I got accepted and that they were offering me a 30K scholarship.

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Things St Louis are known for:
-Gooey butter
-Toasted ravioli
-Cardinals baseball
-Blues hockey
-The Arch
-The second largest mardi gras in the country
-the last authentically intact little Italy in the country
-the #1 zoo in the country
-the oldest botanical garden in the western hemisphere
-largest city park in the country (forest park)
-oldest city park west of the Mississippi (lafayette square)
-home of T.S. Eliot, Maya Angelou, Tennessee Williams and Kate Chopin
-most breweries per capita of any city in the united states and home to Anheuser-Busch..
-an emerging hotbed hub of biotech and medical research
-St Louis style BBQ
-St Louis style pizza
-frozen custard
-the first American city to host the olympic games (WashU's Francis Field)
-the most opulent world's fair ever put on
-a blues and jazz music hub
-the oldest outdoor performing stage in the country (MUNY)
....And so on.
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Hi! I recently committed to WashU's Audiology program!! I have never been to the city but I am so excited to move to STL! I have wanted to attend WashU for the past few years! Any advice for me in regards of how to look for apartments? The best sites (touristy and not) to check out and just really anything else you can/want to tell me about the city!

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WashU has an amazing student body - people who are super friendly and chill, who enjoy their studies but make time to have fun. Supportive, and not competitive.
 

I loved most of my professors. They care about teaching and your personal growth like education bent schools with a liberal arts vibe but aren’t afraid to challenge you as in a rigorous research focused school.
 

The physical spaces are wonderful. The libraries (prior to covid, it was open 24hrs) are peaceful places to work, and most all buildings are modern castles, which look like you’re in an ancient university but offer every modern convenience.
 

St. Louis is a great city. In the surrounding area there’s Forest Park - a massive piece of nature that’s yours to relax in, visit free museums, and go to a wide array of festivals. There are many great coffeeshops in the area to study in (the coffee at Kaldi’s is best imo, but all have great vibes and pretty good coffee). Good food options nearby, and some bars/clubs too. Going beyond that, there’s a variety of neighborhoods with their own unique cultures (Italian and Thai areas, a few upscale places but mostly spots with a diverse community vibe). Plenty to do: Botanical Garden, modern art exhibits, parks, sculpture gardens, malls, clubs, etc. And cheap rent!

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I was so excited to find this thread! I'm attending WashU in the Fall (PhD in Applied Psych of Learning & Motivation in Dept of Ed), but I've lived in STL since ~2013, and I love to share information about the city. I lived in the downtown STL area for several years, then moved to Clayton 2 years ago. My husband also attended WashU (JD, MBA), so our lives have always revolved around the campus, which we lived 5 minutes from by car. I'm happy to answer any questions about life here, but I don't explore the city as much as I used to when living downtown; Clayton is fairly sleepy, as is most of the county, and we're usually too lazy to drive back into the city to do things. 

For housing, I'd recommend sharing a house near WashU or looking at the new developments in the Delmar Loop. The high-rise buildings in Clayton are great and have lots of studios and 1BRs, but the price is a bit higher. I have a car, but plan on using the Metro to get to campus, which is only feasible if you find housing along its route (St. Louis is anything but walkable, so having a car is great, and traffic isn't an issue).

Any first-timers should visit Forest Park (Boathouse, Amphitheatre, etc.), the Arch, the Central West End, the Zoo, the Botanical Gardens, the Cardinals Stadium, the Blues Stadium, the almost-finished Soccer Stadium, and the Ferris Wheel. For food, the best offerings are generally BBQ (Pappy's and Sugarfire are my personal faves), but there are lots of stand-outs (Lona's Lil Eats, Seedz Cafe, Guerrilla Street Food, The Dam, Pi Pizzeria, Lulu's, Natasha's, Rooster, Bailey's Range, Hi-Pointe Drive-In) that can usually be found in Tower Grove or Central West End. The food is reasonably-priced and the portions are sizeable.

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On 4/13/2021 at 12:48 PM, tsomers13 said:

Hi! I recently committed to WashU's Audiology program!! I have never been to the city but I am so excited to move to STL! I have wanted to attend WashU for the past few years! Any advice for me in regards of how to look for apartments? The best sites (touristy and not) to check out and just really anything else you can/want to tell me about the city!

First of all, congratulations on your acceptance to WashU. Probably one of the most underrated colleges considering their vast resources they have.

I'd start looking for apartments now. April and May are likely the best months to start looking for apartments and the best places go within hours. Knowing what you want specifically will allow you to stay ahead of the market because it allows you to establish what is and isn't negotiable.

If you can't be there in person for a viewing, it's likely that a current student in your program can visit the place for you and provide photos/feedback on your behalf.

In addition to the places offered above, I'd add the Zoo, Shakespeare in the Park, the old courthouse, the muny, tower grove park and Soulard's Farmer Market.

For food, I'd recommend Felix's Pizza Pub, De Palm Tree, Pharoah’s Donuts, Sweet Art, Fountain on Locust, Salt+Smoke, Rooster, Polite Society, and Blueberry Hill.

For what it's worth, I didn't find a need for a car in St. Louis and I lived there for 6 years. The buses and the light rail will get you to mostly any location where you'd want to be. The biking community was also growing if that's of any interest to you. :)

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20 hours ago, Regimentations said:

First of all, congratulations on your acceptance to WashU. Probably one of the most underrated colleges considering their vast resources they have.

I'd start looking for apartments now. April and May are likely the best months to start looking for apartments and the best places go within hours. Knowing what you want specifically will allow you to stay ahead of the market because it allows you to establish what is and isn't negotiable.

If you can't be there in person for a viewing, it's likely that a current student in your program can visit the place for you and provide photos/feedback on your behalf.

In addition to the places offered above, I'd add the Zoo, Shakespeare in the Park, the old courthouse, the muny, tower grove park and Soulard's Farmer Market.

For food, I'd recommend Felix's Pizza Pub, De Palm Tree, Pharoah’s Donuts, Sweet Art, Fountain on Locust, Salt+Smoke, Rooster, Polite Society, and Blueberry Hill.

For what it's worth, I didn't find a need for a car in St. Louis and I lived there for 6 years. The buses and the light rail will get you to mostly any location where you'd want to be. The biking community was also growing if that's of any interest to you. :)

Thank you!! I am so so excited to have gotten into WashU and cannot wait to move! I am hoping to be able to find time over the summer to fly down and see St. Louis in person before officially moving so fingers crossed! But thank you so much for all the suggestions! I cannot wait to look into them when I get down there!

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On 1/15/2022 at 11:03 AM, PsychedRat said:

Hello all!

Anyone heard from SLU?

I've received a couple of emails - first one stating they've received my application and another saying they will be implementing a rolling admission process this year. I'm eager to hear back! Good luck!!

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