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Canadian Universities MSW. The waiting game 2015 admissions


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Hi guys :), congratulations to those who got offers, and best of luck to those who are still in the waiting game.

 

My name is Emily, and I am needing some word of advice in terms of applying to U of T and York MSW programs for the next year.

 

Does anyone know what the main differences between those two universities are with this program?

 

Also, to those who got in the program, would you mind sharing what your GPA and credentials/experiences are? That'd really help for me to try and measure up!

 

Thanks a bunch guys.

 

Emily

 

Hello!

 

If you start from the earlier pages you can read some applicant's background information (GPA, employment and volunteer experience etc). Otherwise you can try personally messaging people and jump to around page 132 :)

 

From the research I did prior to applying for my MSW, the main difference between U of T and York is: U of T = more clinical, research and evidence based approach where as York = emphasizes an anti oppressive approach.

 

I can not elaborate much on York asides from the fact that they do offer a considerable amount of funding for students. Their MSW program was not one I considered based on what my academic goals and distance/commuting. On the other hand, U of T offers a wide range of specializations in their MSW program in addition to their collaborative degree options.

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I felt compelled to address this comment -- I apologize if it is out of place with respect to this thread's subject matter. I'm currently awaiting a response for the UofT 2-year MSW. I was waitlisted

I generally dislike getting involved in these conversations on the internet, but I fear I must shake off my hesitation to address this particular comment: “...that professor you described is an anti-o

omg I got into UoT. I'm crying ...I can't believe this as it is my top choice. 

Hello all,

I am interested in applying for the MSW program at U of T. However I am just finishing up my BA in December, and haven't any professors or enough other referees who would be able to write me a reference. I know that my profile would be too weak for consideration at this point (my GPA is also weak). I thought that in the meantime I may be interested in applying for the fast track Social Service Worker programme at George Brown (it takes one year), that way I would also see if I like working in a social service setting  before spending two years studying to get my Masters (which would be a lot of hard work). If I enjoy the work and want to take the MSW later I still can. Does that sound like a reasonable career path, or is it better that I just volunteer a lot over the next few years and get good references and then later apply for my MSW if social work is what interests me?
    Also, is there a great deal of difference between what a social service worker and a social worker can do in terms of working directly with the public? I am not really interested in policy at this stage. 
  About me: After having worked in administration for the last 8 years I have returned to university to get my last year of my Hons BA done. I have also been volunteering at a Distress centre since July.

Thanks!

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Hello all,

I am interested in applying for the MSW program at U of T. However I am just finishing up my BA in December, and haven't any professors or enough other referees who would be able to write me a reference. I know that my profile would be too weak for consideration at this point (my GPA is also weak). I thought that in the meantime I may be interested in applying for the fast track Social Service Worker programme at George Brown (it takes one year), that way I would also see if I like working in a social service setting  before spending two years studying to get my Masters (which would be a lot of hard work). If I enjoy the work and want to take the MSW later I still can. Does that sound like a reasonable career path, or is it better that I just volunteer a lot over the next few years and get good references and then later apply for my MSW if social work is what interests me?
    Also, is there a great deal of difference between what a social service worker and a social worker can do in terms of working directly with the public? I am not really interested in policy at this stage. 
  About me: After having worked in administration for the last 8 years I have returned to university to get my last year of my Hons BA done. I have also been volunteering at a Distress centre since July.

Thanks!

Hey Kristine!

It sounds like you're putting a lot of thought into this, and at the right time! One thing that it is important for you to know is that in terms of an MSW admission, an SSW diploma would definitely help you out in terms of your experience and placements and references, but it would be meaningless in terms of grades as college grades don't mean anything to graduate admissions, they don't even ask for your transcript as far as I know. As well, it is definitely a much cheaper and easier way to figure out if this is the field for you, and just because it won't help you get your masters, grades-wise, it certainly doesn't mean you can't, it just means you have to boost your grades elsewhere if you're looking to boost them. The one-year BSW offered by I believe Lakehead may be a better fit for you. You can definitely read back in this thread, other people have been talking about the same dilemma you're in, MSW vs. SSW, SSW vs. BSW, MSW vs. BSW. The general consensus, though, has been that once you already have your BA, to go back and get a college diploma in something you plan to go to grad school for is, quite frankly, a bit of a waste of time when there are other programs, like the one-year BSW, out there that get you further and would actually give you an opportunity to improve your application in all of the areas that you've identified you want to improve (grades, references, clarity in career goals). Plus the BSW means your MSW would only be one year, so it would be 2 years total instead of 3. It's one hell of a lot easier to get a job with a BSW than with an SSW these days too, if you wind up taking a break in between for whatever reason. I didn't get into any MSW program the first time I applied (to U of T and York) and I was so glad to have a professional BA that would also let me get a job in the field so I could work in the field in the meantime.

In terms of the differences between an SSW and an MSW, there are definitely some differences. As an SSW, you're pretty much going to mostly be doing front line work, likely shift work, unless you're able to find an agency that will let you work your way up, but because of the job market, at least in Toronto right now, you find that a lot of the jobs that may have previously gone to SSW grads are going to BSW or even MSW grads (case in point: I work at a shelter right now with an undergrad in child and youth care, and we just hired on a bunch of relief workers who just graduated from U of T's MSW program, which is the program I'm about to go into). Typically, as an SSW, you'd be doing the really front line work whereas as an MSW, you'd be doing more counselling and case management kinda stuff. BSW grads are typically somewhere in between, and it depends on the employer- a few will get BSW grads for case management and counselling, others will require an MSW or other grad degree. Generally you can't get counselling positions without a masters, though there are a few different options for masters degrees that would let you do counselling (MSW, counselling psychology, U of T has an M. Ed in counselling psychology, even occupational therapists are qualified to do counselling) if that's what you're interested in. It really depends on the work that you'd like to do.

I hope this helped!

Edited by lightning1129
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dear Lightning 1129,

You have been a goldmine of information, thank you for the excellent excellent suggestion of Lakehead! Lots to think about here, I will read more of the thread pages. If its possible, would you be able to give me your email address if I have other questions? I am also in Toronto.

Thanks again!

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dear Lightning 1129,

You have been a goldmine of information, thank you for the excellent excellent suggestion of Lakehead! Lots to think about here, I will read more of the thread pages. If its possible, would you be able to give me your email address if I have other questions? I am also in Toronto.

Thanks again!

Hi Kristine,

I typically don't give out my email, actually, but totally feel free to private message me on here if you have any other questions!

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On 2/26/2015 at 5:37 PM, jjmr89 said:

I only applied to UBC-Okanagan and U of T. I was accepted to UBC-Okanagan a couple weeks ago. I have to give them my answer by March 6. If I don't get into U of T I will be OK - academically I am really excited about UBCO's clinical orientation and I love Kelowna as a city. I still think I'd go to U of T if I had the privilege of choosing between the two, though.

1
 

 

Edited by MSW16_Applicant
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