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Liz113

Anyone interested in Bilingual Speech Language Pathology?

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If so, where are you applying, for what language, and how fluent are you?

What has been your process in pursuing a bilingual focus and how do you maintain your second language?

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I tried pretty hard to find bilingual programs that weren't exclusively for Spanish speakers. I thought that schools in Louisiana or Maine might be more French-friendly, considering their francophone populations. Unfortunately, the only schools I found that were at all interested are in Canada. I considered applying, but ended up going with US schools.

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Right now, I'm applying to very few programs - with only one offering a bilingual focus. Spanish is my native language, so I have no problems maintaining it. I am trying to maintain French & Portuguese by working with international students who come to study English in my school. I would suggest taking more courses and/or keep yourself immersed in the language.

 

Finally, language is not the only factor to take into account of as a bilingual SLP. Latinos, for example, have a different perception of how they take care of their families and how they view disabilities, so there's a cultural factor to note there.

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I wish I could do that. My native language is Turkish and I think there is no hope for me to find a school having Turkish in their program. I am so interested in Bilingual programs though. I studied German also, but I am not as fluent at it as I am in English.

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Hey Bapple, that is really cool. I hope whatever program you go through appreciates your multilingualism and helps you develop the ability to be a multilingual slp. 

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I am! My focus is Spanish, so I haven't had problemsin finding schools. I applied this semester to Columbia U, TCU, UT at Austin, NMSU, ASU, and Arizona U, all of which have bilingual programs. I grew up bilingual myself which is why the focus interests me so much. Where I currently attend they don't offer much of anything related to multicultural issues which is why I'm excited about grad school. 

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Cool, Ellie. I did not grow up bilingual. I acquired Spanish starting in high school and have pursued it as a second major and through study abroad experiences. I also applied to ASU and UT Austin, as well as Indiana U, which have bilingual programs. I also applied to two in-state schools (I live in Ohio). I really hope that my fluency is good enough. I think there is such a need for bilingual professionals, so that is my goal. :)

I am also going to a visit at ASU on the 20th. Have you been there? Do you know much about their program or UT Austin's program?

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Hello all! I am very interested in attending a program that offers a bilingual focus. My second major is Spanish, and I've tried to maintain it through coursework, study abroad, reading, and listening to music in Spanish :) . It is my second language, so it's hard to guage my own fluency... but I believe that my proficiency is appropriate to study bilingual SLP at the graduate level. I completed a phone for the STEPS (bilingual program) at Indiana U, which was nervewracking, but I think that I hopefully did well enough to meet their requirements.

 

Almost all of the programs I applied to (except for University of Iowa and Purdue) offer a bilingual emphasis in some way, so hopefully something works out!

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Hey Arytenoid, sounds like we're in same boat. I am also a Spanish major (in addition to speech and hearing) and have worked very hard to gain fluency. But as you said, how do you gauge your own fluency? I also completed the interview for IU. It's so frustrating that we did the interview so long ago, but have to wait for March for results. I also applied to ASU and UT Austin for bilingual programs (OSU an Ucincy for non-bilingual). Best of luck to you, hopefully we both get the opportunity to pursue bilingual SLP, despite our non-native speaker status. 

Edited by Liz113

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Hello everyone! 

I am interested in programs with a bilingual English/Spanish focus or opportunities. I am from a city that is predominantly Spanish-speaking and I double majored with Spanish, learning it academically, through study abroad and other travel, and of course by practicing all the time. My other major is Psych/Linguistics, and I've also studied the technical linguistic-y aspects of Spanish, too. Hopefully that turns out to be helpful to me as an out-of-field applicant! I've applied to NMSU ad U of Arizona for bilingual certification programs, and UT Dallas and Baylor for bilingual practicum placement opportunities (even though they don't have a certification process). 

Does anyone know about the requirements to practice as a bilingual SLP? 

Edited by Schatzie15

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This is from the ASHA website:

"Bilingual SLPs must be able to independently provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services for speech, language, cognitive, voice, and swallowing disorders using the client's/patient's language and preferred mode of communication. They must also have the linguistic proficiency to

describe the process of normal speech and language acquisition—for both bilingual and monolingual speakers of that language, including how those processes are manifested in oral and written language (or manually coded languages when applicable);

select, administer, and interpret formal and informal assessment procedures to distinguish between communication differences and communication disorders;

apply intervention strategies for treatment of communication disorders in the language or mode of communication most appropriate for the needs of the individual."

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Hi all, 

 

Im interested in the bilingual program as well! I am bilingual  in both mandarin and english and have good proficiencyfor german. Im looking into working in bilingual special ed setting in the future. Ive applied to UT Austin, UNC-chapel hill, and Portland state but my top choice will be UT Austin. Hopefully! Please let me get into any of these schools!

Edited by speechie92

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Hi Everyone !

  I'm also trying to go for bilingual extension programs in Speech Pathology. My parent's native language is Spanish so i am pretty fluent in it with no problem. I also self taught myself some Japanese but i'm not as fluent as i wished i would be :( . I'll have to keep studying. I submitted my applications early January to Queens college, Suny Plattsburgh, Teachers College-C.U, and Lehman College. Best of luck to everyone! 

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Does anyone know if there is even really a market for non-Spanish speakers? My Spanish is not too good but I am trilingual in Mandarin and French. I ended up only applying to Teacher's College for their bilingual extension but it doesn't seem like there's a big need in the field for non-Spanish speakers.

Edited by k1772

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Does anyone know if there is even really a market for non-Spanish speakers? My Spanish is not too good but I am trilingual in Mandarin and French. I ended up only applying to Teacher's College for their bilingual extension but it doesn't seem like there's a big need in the field for non-Spanish speakers.

 

 

A quick Google search for "Mandarin SLP" gave me a ton of results, so I would say there is a need and a market for non-Spanish speakers like you. Speech disorders are not unique to English and Spanish :) With your language skills, you could also easily work abroad. Good luck! 

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I am very interested in bilingual speech pathology as well. I am fluent in Spanish thanks to a double major in Spanish and studying abroad in Madrid, but have found it very challenging to maintain fluency after returning to the US and graduating college. Even though I make an effort to continue to read and listen to music in Spanish it's really hard for me to find people to actually speak it with. I was accepted to Teachers College's bilingual program and was wondering if anyone knew good/bad things about it? Also if there are any suggestions on how to find ways to remain fluent/or if any one knows of any language interchange/spanish speaking groups that get together in the NYC area that would be great!

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I used the website conversationexchange.com to find people to talk with via Skype. I have had a lot of good experiences and great practice. It's a trade off so you would have to be willing to speak to someone else in English so that they could practice as well. I would definitely recommend checking it out if conversation partners are hard to find.

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Another prospective multilingual SLP, though I'm not applying to bilingual programs...I hope to work with Persian, Portuguese and Spanish speakers. I'm totally fluent in Spanish as it's my family language, have an advanced level in Portuguese and am fluent in spoken Persian but really need to work on writing as it's drastically different to the spoken language. I keep up with Persian/Portuguese with Skype or in-person language exchanges (I'd recommend My Language Exchange) and watching local news from Iran/Brazil/Portugal, as it provides a good mix of formal and colloquial dialogue.

 

I also speak French at an advanced level but my largely academic knowledge of it would be useless in this field. I observed a supposedly bilingual SLP last year - who did not speak the language proficiently - and watching her struggle with patients in the 2º language made me ditch any hopes I had at working with my not-so-strong languages.  :wacko:

 

Also, I came across an article from ASHA on bilingual practitioners, if it's of interest to anyone.

 

Alisoj21 - where were you living in Madrid? I live just outside the city  :)

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atrochemoche and scisl006 thanks for all your advice!! Very helpful and will definitely try those websites. I lived with a host family in Chueca right off of Gran Via and about a ten minute walk from Sol. So jealous you live there I had the time of my life there!

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Somethings to think about....

  • Usually these are "multicultural" types extensions/programs, more than bilingual. I often say "bilingual" as well, now that I'm in a program I think I can see the value in distinguishing. As @combustiblecake mentioned, a big part of the equation is culture. And no program can prepare you for alllllll the different language backgrounds you might run into. Good bilingual multicultural training should prepare you to keep an open and critical mind during screening, diagnosis, and treatment regardless of language background - to help you know when you "know enough" or "you don't know enough" to distinguish disorder from difference. Then, a good grad program in general should teach you the value of EBP and finding the appropriate evidence you need in the cases when "you don't know enough" 
  • Coursework probably won't focus on a specific language, but maybe the university offers advanced language/linguistics/grammar courses in/on that language that would be super useful supplements. Essentially, you could build your own multicultural training
  • Finally, check with clinical faculty about the possibility of doing some placements with specific language background clients - that is when a lot of the learning happens. 
Edited by mcamp

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For those of you looking at bilingual programs, Our Lady of the Lake in San Antonio is good another program which offers a bilingual focus. There are also some opportunities there to have Spanish speaking clients.

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