Jump to content
Minnesotan

Denver, CO

Recommended Posts

Also, I believe that Colorado microbrews are the best beers in the world. Most of them are not available outside the state.

You are the second person I've heard mention the micro-brews as a huge plus to living in/near Denver! ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yay!! Not sure if anyone is still reading/following this thread, but I'm super psyched to hear this. I'm from the Northeast, and I hate our winters with a passion (though this year has been very mild and tolerable). I originally wanted to move to FL for school, but I think I would miss the mountains, trees, nature... and the spring/summer/fall seasons. I know Denver gets snow, and winter, but you're one more person who has given me hope that the winters there aren't quite as bad as they are here. Someone mentioned they might be shorter, too, though I don't necessarily believe that. Here, it doesn't start to get up to the mid 40's until probably late march, and we've been known to have snow through early-mid march to. How does Denver compare in this sense?

Hi! I'm a Denver native -- and we can get days in the 50s-60s in December and January one week, then down into the teens the next week. Winter weather in Colorado is consistently unpredictable. One thing that is true, however, is that by March -- except for in the most exceptional years -- you start to have more and more days that are in the mid-to-uppers 60s.

In short, winter in Denver is almost always tolerable because it doesn't come in one long-lasting three month wave, but rather comes and goes throughout the season. For instance, March is either our snowiest or second snowiest month -- and I can recall some rather substantial (36"+) snow storms over the course of my years here that have happened in March... but then within three or four days, it will be sunny and in the upper 40s, with swift snowmelt, and then up into the 50s, 60s, etc., once again! In short -- in my personal opinion, moving to Denver after living anywhere else in the country is very easy, weather-wise. It is the opposite that tends to be the biggest problem! One issue that is frequently cited by people from more humid climes is that living in Denver can cause more sinus-related issues due to the frequent dryness -- but it is certainly manageable and not a deal breaker!

I love living here. :)

EDIT: Oh yeah -- and the microbrews are -- literally -- world-class! Colorado beer has experienced a veritable renaissance. We have some of the best beer in the entire world, now.

Edited by virmundi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To echo the last poster, the weather is for the most part great, but also totally unpredictable. If you can handle that then you will be fine (think four seasons in a day from time to time). There have been years where a big blizzard hits in October with 12+" of snow, then the rest of the winter we won't get more than 12" combined and it's into the 60's on Christmas. What you can rely on is that there will be 300+ days of sunshine, it will be fairly dry year-round (good if you are prone to asthma/lung problems), and cold snaps will last a week at most.

If you are into any type of outdoor activities like hiking, biking, camping, skiing, etc then you'll be in one of the best spots in the US. Even if you aren't, the proximity and access to those means you might pick up a new hobby. There are also a good number of natural hot springs up in the mountains which make for good day trips/weekend excursions. For beer lovers there are the already mentioned microbreweries as well as this: http://www.greatamericanbeerfestival.com/

An added benefit is that Denver International Airport is very accessible with direct flights to nearly everywhere in the country. United, Southwest, and Frontier are the main carriers. It's a minor thing but really convenient that you don't need to drive 2 hours to the airport whenever you have a trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've lived in Colorado for the better part of my life, did my undergrad in Boulder, and am dreading leaving the state for grad school--and I'm someone who dislikes the cold. Colorado has the best of all worlds: we get a a healthy dose of each season and no humidity. Our snows typically come in waves, are light (rarely that heavy, wet snow that is typical out east), and the next day you could be outside without a coat on. It's rare that a snow isn't melted within a week or less.

People who have never been to Denver/Colorado tend not to believe me when I assure them it doesn't snow THAT much here. Yes, we will get large snowstorms a couple times a year (and a massive one every other year or so, it seems), but in between those storms you'll see people in shorts in the middle of February.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am moving to denver in August. Any tips on where to look to find apartments? I am interested in living near washington park. Like just a mile or 2 from the actual park. let me know if you have any ideas where to look

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm attending the Josef Korbell school in the fall, and am super excited!

Since I cannot travel to denver, what are some good places to live? And is there a forum for students to find roommates?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should be attending Josef Korbel in the fall too and am looking for housing. I have never been to Denver and need advice.

I am looking for a nice, quiet apartment complex, more of a young professional feel. I would rather pay a little more for a nice place and would like a maximum commute of 15 minute drive. Any apartment suggestions would be appreciated! Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also considering an offer from DU, what are living costs like around the campus? Are there any current Grad students who can offer any advice for graduate living?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also considering an offer from DU, what are living costs like around the campus? Are there any current Grad students who can offer any advice for graduate living?

 

I second this! I'm seriously considering attending DU in the Fall. I won't have a car, so where are the best places to live on the lightrail/near the campus?  Where are the best areas to live and the best areas to hang out? I'm a city girl, so looking for cool cafes, museums, nightlife. ect.  

 

What is considered "affordable" in Denver?? I was in DC for undergrad and scraping by paying $1150/month for a bedroom in a 2 bedroom apartment.

 

Thanks in advance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not go to school in Denver but have lived here for ~2 years. I live in a large studio for around $600 per month in Capitol Hill (I'd say $800-900 for an upper story 1 bedroom isn't unreasonable), which is "downtown" but still a 20 minute walk or so from the downtown light rail stations. Cap Hill has a great nightlife and is very close to a few other (basically adjoining) neighborhoods that have excellent restaurants, bars etc. as well. I can't really imagine living in any of the other neighborhoods if you don't have a car, have somewhat limited funds and like going out.

 

I personally would not want to live close to DU campus - it seems more expensive, is quite a bit more undergrad-focused and is sincerely lacking in "better" food/drink options than neighborhoods closer to downtown.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm also considering accepting an offer at DU, so this is good news. I have been looking through the Capitol Hill, Highlands, Washington Park, and Congress Park neighborhoods.  Any thoughts on the others, as Capitol Hill seems to come recommended!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I didn't live in Capitol Hill I'd probably live in the Highlands. They are significantly more expensive and going up in price as they gentrify, but have lots of cool restaurants and bars and are close to Confluence Park, which is a nice spot where two little rivers come together and has lots of place to sit and swim and ride bikes, etc. The bikepath that cuts through town goes right by there too and is a nice way to get around and avoid traffic. It's across town from Cap Hill so feels insulated from that side of town, but is still close enough to Lodo (Lower Downtown, near the baseball stadium, has a number of the nicest restaurants, breweries, etc) that you can walk there. It's also significantly farther from DU, but maybe a little closer than Cap Hill to the light rail stations that take you to campus.

 

Wash Park always felt to me more like the neighborhood where 30-sometimes who bought their first house would move. Not that that's a bad thing, but it's very residential for the most part and has always seemed out of my price range (more houses, fewer apartments). It's nice and quiet and safe and near the city's biggest park though and is relatively closer to DU than Capitol Hill (though still not walking distance).

 

I don't know a lot about Congress Park as a distinct neighborhood - it's close enough to me that I tend to lump it in with Capitol Hill (same with Uptown). I've never looked at apartments in that specific area but I imagine it's comparable to the rest of Cap Hill. Another neighborhood to check out is South Pearl, which is very close to campus (almost walking distance, I'd say) and has plenty of businesses and little boutique-y shops and a farmer's market in the summer. I don't venture out that way often so I don't know much else, but I've been there a few times and it always seems pleasant.

 

 

EDIT: Whoops, a correction regarding Congress Park - I was mixing it up with Governor's Park, which is more an adjunct to Cap Hill than a distinct Neighborhood. CONGRESS Park neighborhood is on the other side of Cheesman Park, the other major Denver park and is somewhat more expensive and farther away from downtown than Capitol Hill. It's more upscale and doesn't feel quite as weird (weird in a good way here) as Cap Hill, a little more buttoned down, but still very apartment oriented. It's quieter but has somewhat fewer businesses to keep you occupied than Cap Hill - though 17th Ave has Vine St. Pub which has some of my favorite burgers in town (and a number of coffee shops/restaurants surrounding it). I have a friend who lives in a gorgeous apartment up there (8th floor, hardwood, balcony) that runs him around $1,000 per month and that's sort of a steal up there for a place that nice. I looked at a basement apartment in that area that was $800 for a 1 bedroom.

Edited by vtstevie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone! I'm about to accept my place in the Korbel School for the MA International Security program. SO PUMPED to be moving to Denver - the city, the school and program, the quality of life, the breweries, etc.

 

While I love the idea of living in Highland, where all my friends are and which feels like the coolest neighborhood in the city, it seems more practical to live near campus in order to promote actual studying. I'm looking at the Carmel apartments (link here: http://www.carmelapartments.com/vista-student-apartments/brochure), but am sure that there are other great alternatives. For those heading out to DU this summer/fall, what are you thinking in terms of location, type of housing, costs, etc?

 

Coming from DC I am astounded by how cheap apartments are, but then again, I'll be responsible for my living costs so want to keep them relatively low. Also, as a female who recently got mugged in front of my apartment - in the SAFEST part of DC - and having read up on crime stats in the city, I'm nervous to be in a less than desirable area, or in an apartment set up that isn't particularly secure.

 

If anyone can weigh in on anything mentioned above, I'd love to hear some feedback of current students, residents, or other incoming DU folks.

 

Thanks! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've applied and been accepted to an MA program at the University of Denver, and I'm kind of curious as to what it's like/if it's possible to live near the university as a grad student without a car....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently accepted to University of Denver. I'm very interested in the Capitol Hill neighborhood for its lower rent and the access to the city center, but I am a quiet person, not given to night life. Thoughts on whether the neighborhood will drive someone like me crazy?

 

 

I've applied and been accepted to an MA program at the University of Denver, and I'm kind of curious as to what it's like/if it's possible to live near the university as a grad student without a car....

 

Don't know if this is helpful, but I'll be going without a car, and am planning to use the metro to get around town. It seems fairly reliable as public transit goes, and there's a light rail station on the corner of campus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I've never lived in Denver, I've never had trouble getting around car free when I visit.  To me, that's the biggest caveat to living in Denver.  Just make sure that you read the light rail maps and know where the bus routes are.  And check out Denver's Citydata page.  There are a lot of good suggestions on there as well as break downs of the neighborhoods and where to live and where not to live. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been accepted to the Anschutz Medical Campus for a grad program. I'm unfamiliar with Denver and where things are, so how close is Aurora to downtown Denver? Any students at the medical campus who know where are the good areas for grad students to live? I'm looking for quiet but not boring, I'm fresh out of college at Ohio State and still want to get out and meet people and be by bars and restaurants :) Any information would help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been accepted to the Anschutz Medical Campus for a grad program. I'm unfamiliar with Denver and where things are, so how close is Aurora to downtown Denver? Any students at the medical campus who know where are the good areas for grad students to live? I'm looking for quiet but not boring, I'm fresh out of college at Ohio State and still want to get out and meet people and be by bars and restaurants :) Any information would help!

Aurora is a suburb east of Denver, but they are pretty much directly connected to each other. You can get from Anschutz to downtown via Colfax or one of its parallel streets in about 25 minutes. A popular place to live that is also convenient to Anschutz is the Lowry area. You might also want to look into living in Park Hill and the City Park area - a little more quiet and residential, but in between Anschutz and the main scene in Denver. I lived just west of City Park and worked in Aurora. The drive took about 20 minutes during rush hour.

 

PM me if you would like anymore information about life in Denver. I was not a med student so I can't speak to Anschutz itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have researched the housing market extensively around Denver for quite some time. The market is exploding at this time, but I have found a place that provides a safe housing opportunity for a fair price called The Lodge in Denver West. Here is an excerpt from their website. PM me for more information, I know finding housing can be rough.I will gladly answer any questions :D Hope this helps!

 

"Welcome to The Lodge, Denver West's newest luxury living. With stunning views of the city and surrounding foothills, these spacious apartment homes combine a picturesque location with the ultimate in amenities and convenience. Spacious designs and open floor plans bring elegance and simplicity to The Lodge. With ample views and open space right at your door, our stylish designs range from one bedroom layouts starting at 679 Square Feet to our large two master bedroom plans up to 1,117 square feet. With an onsite state-of-the-art fitness center, a gorgeous clubhouse, a comprehensive business center and conference room, and a resort style pool, sauna and spa, The Lodge has been meticulously designed to meet the most discerning needs.

You'll love the attention to every detail. Indoors, you'll relish our gourmet kitchens complete with granite countertops, generous islands and the finest stainless steel appliances. With great rooms that are truly great, double vanity sinks, palatial walk-in closets, and airy terraces offering exceptional mountain and city views, The Lodge is an enticing place to be. In fact, if it weren't for the Lodge's alluring outdoor setting, you might never leave.

Nestled in the foothills of Denver West, The Lodge offers the unique benefit of getting away from it all while living right next door to everything. Outdoor enthusiasts will delight in the hiking trails that begin just outside your door. Not to mention the proximity to the beautiful Rocky Mountains, just minutes away. Days filled with activity can be recounted over dinner and drinks at one of the many fine restaturants nearby. From movies and dining to shopping and nightlife, The Lodge Denver West truly has it all."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Grad Cafe. I have not posted on here in ages, and I'm unsure if anyone is still following this topic, but thought I would post since I'm from Denver. The city has changed dramatically within the past few years, especially in regard to housing availability and rental prices. I live in the South now since I am pursuing my PhD here but spend school breaks with my family out in Denver. If you are thinking about moving there, you might have heard how expensive it is out there right now, as well as how difficult it is to find an apartment or a room to rent. New and very expensive units are cropping up all over the place, and the people can't afford rent. Hopefully this post can help some people who want to pursue a graduate degree at some of the great schools there but are worried about securing affordable housing. 

There are a couple neighborhoods in the central area where the housing cost is a little lower than other parts of the city. Most of them are on the West Side, more specifically in Central West or in SouthWest. Anything in NorthWest (Highland, Berkley, Sunnyside or Sloans Lake) is crazy expensive- I would try to avoid them if at all possible unless you have a high income. The cheaper areas on the West Side are all south of Colfax and they are: Villa Park, Barnum, Ruby Hill, Harvey Park and Overland (although I would point out that housing is very limited in all of these areas, I would say this is especially true in Overland due to it being very small and so close to Broadway, the main road that runs through downtown, but it's still worth a mention). There is a neighborhood that forms the dividing line between Sloans and Villa Park, (and thus separates NorthWest from Central West Denver) that developers are trying to take over, it is called West Colfax. Prices are getting high over there, but it's still worth mentioning because it is extremely close to Light Rail. Other than these places, which are all in Denver proper, you might check out Lakewood, which is also on the West Side and may have some good deals on apartments. Central Lakewood is also right on the Light Rail line as well, so very convenient. Do let me know if you wanted any more info, I hope that this post can help some people and good luck to y'all in your degree programs!

Edited by Postmoddities

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Postmoddities said:

Hi Grad Cafe. I have not posted on here in ages, and I'm unsure if anyone is still following this topic, but thought I would post since I'm from Denver. The city has changed dramatically within the past few years, especially in regard to housing availability and rental prices. I live in the South now since I am pursuing my PhD here but spend school breaks with my family out in Denver. If you are thinking about moving there, you might have heard how expensive it is out there right now, as well as how difficult it is to find an apartment or a room to rent. New and very expensive units are cropping up all over the place, and the people can't afford rent. Hopefully this post can help some people who want to pursue a graduate degree at some of the great schools there but are worried about securing affordable housing. 

There are a couple neighborhoods in the central area where the housing cost is a little lower than other parts of the city. Most of them are on the West Side, more specifically in Central West or in SouthWest. Anything in NorthWest (Highland, Berkley, Sunnyside or Sloans Lake) is crazy expensive- I would try to avoid them if at all possible unless you have a high income. The cheaper areas on the West Side are all south of Colfax and they are: Villa Park, Barnum, Ruby Hill, Harvey Park and Overland (although I would point out that housing is very limited in all of these areas, I would say this is especially true in Overland due to it being very small and so close to Broadway, the main road that runs through downtown, but it's still worth a mention). There is a neighborhood that forms the dividing line between Sloans and Villa Park, (and thus separates NorthWest from Central West Denver) that developers are trying to take over, it is called West Colfax. Prices are getting high over there, but it's still worth mentioning because it is extremely close to Light Rail. Other than these places, which are all in Denver proper, you might check out Lakewood, which is also on the West Side and may have some good deals on apartments. Central Lakewood is also right on the Light Rail line as well, so very convenient. Do let me know if you wanted any more info, I hope that this post can help some people and good luck to y'all in your degree programs!

Thank you! Just started looking for places in Denver and so far it seems crazy! Do you have any other advice about places to look (in terms of how to find apartments)?  To me it doesn't seem like the denver craigslist has many postings that aren't by large companies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2016 at 6:43 PM, lightballsdeep said:

Thank you! Just started looking for places in Denver and so far it seems crazy! Do you have any other advice about places to look (in terms of how to find apartments)?  To me it doesn't seem like the denver craigslist has many postings that aren't by large companies. 

There's one website that I like called REcolorado. Many of the listings are homes for sale, but they have rentals as well and it is updated daily. Also what I like about it is the interactive searchable map, which makes it very easy to see what's available in your preferred areas. I hope this can be of some help, good luck to you!

http://www.recolorado.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Denver. I would definitely live or at least spend a whole summer there.Downtown Denver is very convenient with lots of great places to eat like Grimaldi's, Jamba Juice and Earl's. There is also a vibrant nightlife Beta, Viewhouse and Club Vinyl. Having lived in NYC, Denver feels like a hometown to have fun with your family. Somehow other cities give me a less family friendly vibe but Denver and the Springs are very welcoming with open spaces, friendly people and an easy going vibe that big cities lack. I would say it is the perfect place for a retreat.  

Edited by Kratistos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.