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Small new graduate class, good or bad?


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So I just found out the school I will be attending for graduate study has a very small incoming class in my department, 9 new people when they currently have about 170. This is a large state school with lots of funding I am just wondering if yall considered this a good or bad thing? I am excited about starting work with my advisor and I know there is nothing I can do about it. I just wanted to get yalls opinion on the situation.

 

Thanks!

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Is this a masters program? You're certain that the dept is on solid ground financially? In many places it is the state schools that are suffering drastic cuts right now. 

 

That said, you're in. Celebrate. You may find that in a smaller cohort you have more access to resources, like time with profs.

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Well, the fewer of you there are, the more attention and help from your mentor and others in the department. I'm one of two new students in my department (which is already pretty small) so there's less competition for lab space, I guess. It's probably better to take on 9 new people who are exceptional than to take 18 which include those who won't really benefit the department. I've also heard that some places are trying to take fewer students since many fields are having difficulty placing all of their graduates as it is now.

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Chiming in as one of three new students in my already small department. I actually liked both the small department and that I'm my advisor's only student. I agree with FinallyAccepted and say that the smaller class can possibly be beneficial as it could give access to more resources as well as time with professors. And to expand on the job placement, it is possible that if your department/advisor is good then you have a possibility for more mentorship during your program and for help finding a job.

I'm certainly in the it's a good thing camp.

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I have only 5 people in my MS cohort. I like it since I get to know the other members of the cohort and I feel we can dive into lectures at a more personal level. My upcoming PhD cohort seems to be only slightly larger at about 10 students. 

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Smaller cohort may mean better relationship with both your advisers and your peers, but definitely be on the lookout for problems - may be downsizing, but that's not necessarily a death knell. I'm joining an incredibly small program and had similar worries, but hopefully all will go well!

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I came in with 6 people in one of my cohorts and 12 in the other, and 12 was considered huge for this program. A small cohort size isn't necessarily indicative of financial problems. Some programs (including some MA programs) only like to onboard small groups every year to give them personal attention.

 

In both of my cohorts the relatively small size was nice - I knew everyone in my cohort, we grew close, and our class discussions were rich. After coursework was over we supported each other.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Small = Less competition (for travel money etc) among students. I was in a huge cohort for my MA and there were peoole whom I never met informally. That sucks. Small is better.

If there s otherwise 170 students, depending on student prof ratio attention might not be that available. Check whethet professors will be on sabbatical. It may be that several ones are gone and so the intake was lower, or there is funding restructurization in the air.

either way don t worry too much. It s out of your control.

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So I just found out the school I will be attending for graduate study has a very small incoming class in my department, 9 new people when they currently have about 170. This is a large state school with lots of funding I am just wondering if yall considered this a good or bad thing? I am excited about starting work with my advisor and I know there is nothing I can do about it. I just wanted to get yalls opinion on the situation.

 

Thanks!

 

i think it really comes down to personal preferences. It could be a budget issue, or some other reasons that makes your program to have and only have 9 new students.

 

My program this year has 2 new students and the total number of students (no masters) are often less than 25. Funding after first year is straight from the PI so it really doesn't matter if the school is large or small, chances are the funding isn't from the state anyway.

 

Welcome to Tallanasty, or what I prefer to call, hell.

Edited by aberrant
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