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Just graduated with B.S. in Psych but want an MBA


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I graduated this past May with my B.S. in Psychology from one of the top polytechnic institutes on the east coast. During undergrad, however, I changed my major about a million times and only settled on Psychology because I had to pick something in order to graduate on time. I'm in pre-req classes now for Speech Pathology but the passion just isn't there. What I like about SLP is the career stability and money. I'm way more interested in technology and business because I'm quite introverted and the idea of working with computers instead of people appeals to me so much more than exerting myself working with people alllll day long.

I'm really interested in Pace University's MBA in Information Systems because of the blend of IT and business (my brother works in IT and loves it, so he's given me a bit of insight into the field). I'm doubting that I can get into any MBA or Master's program though because of my grades. I have a 3.0 GPA from undergrad (4.0 in my SLP pre-reqs but that does me no good now) and 154/149/4.0 GRE from my second time taking it (in anticipation of applying to SLP programs).

Do I have any chance of getting into school?

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  • 4 months later...

Many programs have work required before certain classes, etc.  Many with Business Undergrads can opt out/test out etc.  You may not get out of some of the early work like these folks, but it won't work against you.  Your GPA is going to be on the cusp for many programs.  Make sure you have a strong GRE/GMAT and none of this will be out of reach.  Psych actually lends itself to business nicely (Management, Leadership, etc.)

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  • 2 months later...

ay yo I have BS in psychology too. I'm interested in MBA potentially too but I have high standards for myself and I want to go to a top school. I think grad school is all a joke if it doesn't get you where you want to be. What @MarkMc said about work experience is true. I've read average is 3-5 years of work experience. People sometimes get in with less experience but I don't have much so I'm not applying right now. I think you need to do more research about schools. Maybe call admissions or check class profiles to see if your score is competitive. Also, maybe consider taking the GMAT. Who knows maybe you would do better on it than GRE? But a lot of B schools accept GRE now too because it tests the same things as GMAT I think?? If you're worried about your GPA being too low, then I would suggest taking some more classes like maybe accounting or marketing to demonstrate interest in business. Calculus is also good but you prob already took it if you were a BS. Either calc or computer science was required at my school for BS in psych. Good luck!

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23 hours ago, rack_attack124 said:

ay yo I have BS in psychology too. I'm interested in MBA potentially too but I have high standards for myself and I want to go to a top school. I think grad school is all a joke if it doesn't get you where you want to be. What @MarkMc said about work experience is true. I've read average is 3-5 years of work experience. People sometimes get in with less experience but I don't have much so I'm not applying right now. I think you need to do more research about schools. Maybe call admissions or check class profiles to see if your score is competitive. Also, maybe consider taking the GMAT. Who knows maybe you would do better on it than GRE? But a lot of B schools accept GRE now too because it tests the same things as GMAT I think?? If you're worried about your GPA being too low, then I would suggest taking some more classes like maybe accounting or marketing to demonstrate interest in business. Calculus is also good but you prob already took it if you were a BS. Either calc or computer science was required at my school for BS in psych. Good luck!

I agree with @rack_attack124 you'll need to sort some of this out.  I scored much better on the GRE, which I did much better on in terms of percentiles (except for writing).  However, when you do the conversion scoring it seems as though this happens for many people and may push you down in the qualifying.  You can find these conversions online.  There are programs that will take folks right out of undergrad (mine was one).  And they even offered a BS/MBA (or BA/MBA - can't remember which).  Many programs have a qualifying "score" (GMAT or GRE plus GPA times a multiplier) with minimums on both. 

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And - graduate admissions department are the best place to start.  I ended up choosing the program with the admissions department that was the most straight forward and gave me clear answers about what it would take to get in.  They should be able to guide you on their ideal, typical, and borderline candidate profile.

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9 minutes ago, MarkMc said:

I agree with @rack_attack124 you'll need to sort some of this out.  I scored much better on the GRE, which I did much better on in terms of percentiles (except for writing).  However, when you do the conversion scoring it seems as though this happens for many people and may push you down in the qualifying.  You can find these conversions online.  There are programs that will take folks right out of undergrad (mine was one).  And they even offered a BS/MBA (or BA/MBA - can't remember which).  Many programs have a qualifying "score" (GMAT or GRE plus GPA times a multiplier) with minimums on both. 

I hate the GRE to GMAT conversion. My GRE score was 80th/81st percentile yet only converted to 640 GMAT. That thing is not accurate. I wish they would just judge the GRE on the percentiles. 

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On 4/7/2016 at 9:25 PM, rack_attack124 said:

I hate the GRE to GMAT conversion. My GRE score was 80th/81st percentile yet only converted to 640 GMAT. That thing is not accurate. I wish they would just judge the GRE on the percentiles. 

Unfortunately it appears the conversion is correct.  As someone who took both I scored significantly lower on the GMAT.  It appears that for one reason or another the GMAT is more competitive than the GRE and thus the higher percentiles in the GRE typically falls significantly in the GMAT.

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2 hours ago, MarkMc said:

Unfortunately it appears the conversion is correct.  As someone who took both I scored significantly lower on the GMAT.  It appears that for one reason or another the GMAT is more competitive than the GRE and thus the higher percentiles in the GRE typically falls significantly in the GMAT.

I don't agree with that. If you read about the conversion tables it has 67% error. 

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20 hours ago, rack_attack124 said:

I don't agree with that. If you read about the conversion tables it has 67% error. 

Where do you see a 67% error?  I see a predicted range of scores (and the anticipated score was actually higher than my GMAT score when my GRE was converted).  It gave me a higher predicted quantitative and lower predicted verbal percentile.  You may disagree, but typically GMAT test takers are better versed in quantitative methods (save for the science specific). 

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1 hour ago, MarkMc said:

Where do you see a 67% error?  I see a predicted range of scores (and the anticipated score was actually higher than my GMAT score when my GRE was converted).  It gave me a higher predicted quantitative and lower predicted verbal percentile.  You may disagree, but typically GMAT test takers are better versed in quantitative methods (save for the science specific). 

I read it somewhere. I'll post the link if I find it but I have no wifi where I am. How much different were your scores and what kind of programs are you applying to? I never took GMAT but now I'm thinking about it in case I did better on that than GRE. I already took GRE twice and I'm not happy with my score because I'm not getting into schools not to say that's why I didn't get in but I think scores matter. 

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@MarkMc this is the article I was talking about. http://www.gmac.com/why-gmac/gmac-news/gmnews/2009/september/dont-let-the-gre-tool-mislead-you.aspx 

I mean I read another thing from ETS that standard error was 54 or something which is still not good. They are different tests and you can't make them equivalent. I think people should just use percentile to measure GRE and not try to convert it to a GMAT score.  

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On 4/11/2016 at 1:08 PM, rack_attack124 said:

@MarkMc this is the article I was talking about. http://www.gmac.com/why-gmac/gmac-news/gmnews/2009/september/dont-let-the-gre-tool-mislead-you.aspx 

I mean I read another thing from ETS that standard error was 54 or something which is still not good. They are different tests and you can't make them equivalent. I think people should just use percentile to measure GRE and not try to convert it to a GMAT score.  

@rack_attack124 I think the challenge here was when this was published the GRE had already changed format, but the GMAT had not.  There may have been difficulty trying to compare tests that were even more different then than they are now.  I applied to a DPA, a DBA, 2 in Technology Management, a Communications Media Program, and a Financial Planning Program.  On the GMAT I had a perfect AW score 4.5 on the GRE.  (GMAT was like 94th percentile and GRE was 80th).  Quantitative I was in the low teens on the GMAT, but 48th percentile on the GRE.  Verbal was about a little higher on GMAT (high 70's/low 80's compared to 71st percentile on GRE).  My biggest swing was far and away the quantitative scores.  This is coming off a BS in Business Administration, a MBA in Finance, and a MA in Diplomacy and International Relations.

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