Jump to content
ForensicPsych93

Fall 2017 Applications

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Plasticity said:

That is the way to go and focus on clinical program's that are more research based and a clinical science model of training. 

Do you think it is an issue of fit/research interests or your application?

I don't think it's an issue of fit or research interests. I specific applied to programs that had POI's of research that I've read/cited in my research. I'm not sure if it's a problem of something like like personal statements or something else not being up to par. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On April 6, 2016 at 10:59 AM, PS7654 said:

Here are some people I would suggest looking into for those of you who are interested in clinical psych faculty with forensic and delinquency/criminal behavior interests (some are adult and some are juvenile-oriented):

John Edens, Texas A&M

Chris Barry, Washington State

Paul Frick, Louisiana State

Nora Charles, Southern Mississippi

Amanda Fanniff, Palo Alto

Sue Righthand, Maine

 

In addition, check out conferences. Even if you don't attend you can usually find programs online. This could show you who is currently doing research you're interested in. I recommend the American Psychology & Law conference, specifically. It was just held last month.

Keep 

 

On April 7, 2016 at 10:42 PM, forensicpsych2017 said:

Thank you so much! I have Palo Alto & Washington State but the other schools are ones I haven't checked out yet. I appreciate the help! :)

Hi, I too am applying to programs with emphasis particularly in At risk adolescents that touch on juvenile delinquency, etc. Its extremely hard because not many schools have Forensic Tracks. My suggestion is rather than focusing on tracks and programs with specializations in Forensics is to focus on what research professors have done that is very similar to what you want to do. Why? Well because many programs listed above are NOT fully funded. And personally I looked into Palo Alto in Cal, But I'm from NYC and well cost is really a big factor for phD programs. If you do not mind attending a non funded program then by all means- but it is something rather important to many so just keep that in mind when applying to programs.

I suggest

Drexel U.

John Jay

Fairleigh Dickinson- Covers 75% of tuition

UMass

Sam Houston U.

All Fully funded & APA accredited. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I created this forum, and well so far my application stats are rising wanted to know the chances from where I currently stand for clinical phd programs. 

As of now I have 5 Poster/oral presentations (One is regional) where I am First author of 3/5 of them second on the other two. I may have several more poster presentation by the time applications come around but so far this is what I have (Just waiting on dates to for conferences). I also have a MA thesis where I am hoping will be published as well as another study. So i'll be submitting 2 papers for pub by the NEXT app cycle. My Masters gpa is 3.8 & Undergraduate=3.5. I have about 3+ years of research experience. I have great letters of recommendation. My top choices are Fordham U, Drexel U, UMass, John Jay, Fairleigh Dickinson, UCONN, Emory. I am applying to more schools but I have close to 4-5 potential professors I'll be applying to work with. Many have published in topics closely related to what I'm currently working on. 

I'm retaking GRE this summer -shooting for 310 (or 90^ percentile for verbal). I am very nervous of not getting in because I've been busting my a** this past year to increase my stats (I know others also are) but some post are discouraging to read. ITs hard not to compare yourself to others. Any advice on what else I can be doing. I didn't mention but I have tons of clinical experience as well (I know this doesn't matter as much as research though). But case management for DV shelter (1 yr), Camp Counselor& Tutor (special needs) -2 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/13/2016 at 9:08 AM, ForensicPsych93 said:

I created this forum, and well so far my application stats are rising wanted to know the chances from where I currently stand for clinical phd programs. 

As of now I have 5 Poster/oral presentations (One is regional) where I am First author of 3/5 of them second on the other two. I may have several more poster presentation by the time applications come around but so far this is what I have (Just waiting on dates to for conferences). I also have a MA thesis where I am hoping will be published as well as another study. So i'll be submitting 2 papers for pub by the NEXT app cycle. My Masters gpa is 3.8 & Undergraduate=3.5. I have about 3+ years of research experience. I have great letters of recommendation. My top choices are Fordham U, Drexel U, UMass, John Jay, Fairleigh Dickinson, UCONN, Emory. I am applying to more schools but I have close to 4-5 potential professors I'll be applying to work with. Many have published in topics closely related to what I'm currently working on. 

I'm retaking GRE this summer -shooting for 310 (or 90^ percentile for verbal). I am very nervous of not getting in because I've been busting my a** this past year to increase my stats (I know others also are) but some post are discouraging to read. ITs hard not to compare yourself to others. Any advice on what else I can be doing. I didn't mention but I have tons of clinical experience as well (I know this doesn't matter as much as research though). But case management for DV shelter (1 yr), Camp Counselor& Tutor (special needs) -2 years.

Make sure that if you plan on applying to Drexel to study for the LSAT since it's a required test if you want to go the forensic route and the Psych Subject test if you plan on applying to John Jay! I don't want to go a law school route which is the only reason Drexel is not on my list, otherwise that would be my top school since it's an amazing program. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, forensicpsych2017 said:

Make sure that if you plan on applying to Drexel to study for the LSAT since it's a required test if you want to go the forensic route and the Psych Subject test if you plan on applying to John Jay! I don't want to go a law school route which is the only reason Drexel is not on my list, otherwise that would be my top school since it's an amazing program. Good luck!

I though the LSAT was only required if you're going to go the PhD/JD route. You can apply for just the PhD for the forensic concentration. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On April 17, 2016 at 0:08 PM, FacelessMage said:

I though the LSAT was only required if you're going to go the PhD/JD route. You can apply for just the PhD for the forensic concentration. 

There are TWO programs the combined PhD/JD route and the Clinical PhD route with an added concentration in Forensics. I am hoping to apply only to the Clinical PhD program and that only "requires" the GRE. The subject GRE is recommended but NOT a requirement. I just spoke to Drexel University and looked it up on their website. http://drexel.edu/grad/programs/coas/psychology-phd/ - This implies that if you want a law degree + PhD yes you must take both the GRE and LSAT. But as mentioned its certainly not required if your going for clinical phd with a concentration in Forensics. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am just beginning research into a PhD in Psychology, and likely won't apply this year; my goal is actually Fall 2018.  I have a M.S. in speech-language pathology and am currently practicing, but my dream is a PhD. There are no PhD programs for SLP anywhere near me, and my family situation means I can't move. So in doing research I found the local university's PhD program faculty in cognitive psychology match many of my interests. I am very interested, and my stats are adequate, with a strong GPA (4.0 in my MS, 3.3 overall in my undergrad from a top university) and decent GRE (old scores, but convert to 151Q, 163V, 5.0). I would work to increase especially the Q when I retake it since mine are currently 6 years old.  I am definitely not the traditional candidate as far as past research, and I am not moving, so I will be looking at just one program.

So this fall I will be making contact with POI, doing research about my specific areas of research interest, and even more research into how my current field meshes with psychology. I will also work on poster and oral presentations that reflect this interest. It's possible I could end up applying this December, but it's not my current plan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also planning on applying to clinical PhD programs this upcoming fall, and potentially to some public health masters programs as back-up options. Do you all think multiple high impact publications (3-5 articles, depending on the review process by application time, and a book chapter ) as well as solid research experience in the field counterbalance an average undergraduate GPA and GRE scores? Clinical programs are competitive and although I am confident in my research abilities, I worry future professors will not recognize that if they only see my numbers on paper. Like many of you, I have taken the GRE multiple times now and am discouraged by how little by scores rise each time--my highest scores were 150Q and 160V. Would love to hear perspectives from either people who have applied in past years or those who are preparing to apply this year.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone - thanks for all that you've been posting - it's so helpful to read. I'm applying this fall (2016) in hopes of gaining admission to a clinical psych PhD program for the fall of 2017. I know how competitive clinical psych programs are, but I want to just see what you guys think - do I have a realisitc shot? 

Major - Psych, Minor - Behavioral Neuroscience

GPA Overall - 3.71 / Major GPA - 3.94

GRE - 155(v) 158(q)

Research - 

  • psych research assistant for four years, 5+ conference presentations with the lab, pursuing an honors thesis in the lab
  • psych research assistant and two other labs, both clinical (for two summers)

Work / Intern

  • undergraduate intern at a psychiatric hospital developing interventions for children
  • student intern at the department of psychiatry in a major area hospital

University activities

  • head of student government academic affairs / student representative for the college 
  • EBoard member for undergraduate neuroscience researchers 

Honors

  • psi chi
  • nu rho psi
  • research fellowship
  • deans list 

 

just looking at the hard data, is it unrealistic to think I have shot? (personal statement aside)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey their guys. Looking for behavior or behavioral neuroscience programs involved with responses to drugs like marijuana. With a developmental twist is a bonus! I applied to 10 last year and got 8 interview invites and 2 offers. Had to decline for some personal reasons (family deaths and what not) but ill be re-applying next year. Good stats and not too worried. 3.9 GPA, 6 years of research in 4 different labs , co-author on 4 pubs, 4 great recommendations from top people in the field. only thing lacking is my GRE which is v=158 (79%) q= 154 (56%) and AW= 5 (93%). Im not too worried about applying again. pretty sure ill get invites and offers. just wondering if you guys had any idea for programs or PIs that are focused in behavioral neuroscience and substance use (other than tobacco and alcohol)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm planning to apply for experimental PhDs in the area of Forensic Psych. I'm currently finishing up my MA at a small Canadian university. I have a lot of conference posters and oral presentations, but no publications (which is stressing me out a little) and a high UG and MA GPA. Hopefully that is enough to at least get some interviews!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone, these have been so interesting and helpful to read! I plan on applying to mostly counseling psych Ph.D. programs in the fall rather than clinical psych, because I see myself focusing more on practicing in the future. However, I don't have my masters, and will be graduating in May with a Bachelors of Science in psychology. My cumulative gpa is a 3.9, and my major gpa is slightly higher, around a 3.95. I don't have any poster presentations or publications yet, but I am pursuing my honors thesis as a hopeful presentation. I have worked for the past two years as an eating disorders peer mentor in the psych center at my school, and am the current President of an eating concerns advisory group. I have also been an undergrad RA for the past years. My gre scores are just average, 158 (quant) and 154 (verbal) 4.5 (writing). Will my gpa and experience be enough for a counseling Ph.D program, even though I have no current publications?

thanks and good luck to all of you! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been lurking for around a year, didn't get into any schools this fall so I decided to finally make an account and actually chat with you all as I work through reapplying :P

 

3.98 undergrad GPA, part of a lot of honors groups (including a scholarship through my uni's honors program), 2 years of research experience with 6 presentations at national conferences.

I'm retaking the GRE, as it was my weak spot last year.

My major is psychology with an anthropology minor, and I'm looking into PhD's in social psych. Specifically I want to do research in sexuality and intimate relationships. Unfortunately I'm really struggling with finding POI's with this focus. In addition I'm open to international programs, as long as they aren't cost prohibitive.

Soon I'll be looking into jobs or volunteer positions to make up for my time away from the lab after graduation. 

Nice to to finally talk to you all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29 March 2016 at 9:56 PM, FeelTheBern said:

For reference, my SO got a 163 on Verbal, and 148 on Quantitative. His Quant. was low but because his Verbal was over the 90% and combined his score was over 310 he decided not to retake it. He got into his top-choice program and was never questioned about his GRE by the school he was accepted to (he was only questioned about his Quant. score by one school during an interview). In the end, people will tell you different things, but it's really up to you whether you think it would be worth it to retake it :)

I will say that Clinical Psych programs are ridiculously competitive, so GRE scores may be more important than they are in my SO's field (Cognitive Neuroscience) Good luck! I definitely think you have a great looking application where you stand right now!

@FeelTheBern Just out of curiosity, I was under the impression that Cog Neuro programs tend to appreciate higher Quant scores -- would you say this is not true? If you don't mind me asking, what programs did your SO get accepted to?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 31 March 2016 at 0:05 PM, TenaciousBushLeaper said:

After sometime on this forum I'll finally be applying the coming application season. A part of me feels like an old man applying to grad school, if I get in somewhere I'll be 25 when I start, so not tooo old but compared to someone who just got out of undergrad it seems like a lot of time in between the transition.

I'll be 27 when I start -- applying this fall too, so if you consider yourself old, I'd be ancient!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/31/2016 at 0:44 AM, neur0cat said:

@FeelTheBern Just out of curiosity, I was under the impression that Cog Neuro programs tend to appreciate higher Quant scores -- would you say this is not true? If you don't mind me asking, what programs did your SO get accepted to?

Hi @neur0cat! I think that higher quant. scores are definitely appreciated in most Cog Neuro programs. Honestly, I think that my SO would have been invited to many more interviews if his had been higher (he was invited to three out of 10). However, it just so happened that the most quant. heavy program that my SO applied to accepted him and no questions were ever asked about him scoring in the 38th percentile on that section. I will say that the schools that he received interview invites from really didn't seem to care about the GRE at all, which is why I think it may be possible that he was eliminated before the interview stage at some schools because of his score. The idea, in my head at least, is that once you are invited to the interview stage they have seen you on paper (GRE, GPA, publications, conferences, etc.) and now want to see if they want to work on research with you for the next several years and if your ideas/plans fit with one another.

To answer your second question, he received interview invites at 3 of the 10 schools he applied to and was accepted to all 3 - Northeastern, Tufts, and NYU. He ended up choosing NYU! Good luck this upcoming application season! :) 

Edited by FeelTheBern

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey everyone! I’m an occasional lurker that is applying this year. Everyone on this forum really intimidates me, but I’m glad we can all converse and commiserate here!

I graduated from undergrad with overall GPA 3.3 (because I determined too late that I wasn’t suited for/interested in medical school and pre-med classes destroyed my GPA) and major GPAs of 3.7 each. I majored in Psychology and Asian Studies (conc. in Japanese) and I want to research adjustment stress, coping mechanisms, and well-being in a cross-cultural context (mainly East-West) in a Social Psychology PhD program. I have two years of experience as an RA (one year in undergrad, one year volunteering) in labs not in my specific field of interest. I’m currently teaching English in Japan and conducting my own independent research on the expat population here. I’m planning on taking the GRE while I’m here (my best so far is V: 160, Q: 155, W: 4.5) because most of the programs that do research in my area (the few that I’ve found) are higher tier programs and I need to compensate for GPA.

 

I can get two solid letters of recommendation in academia, but I would have trouble beyond that (I can get several from current employers though). I have 1 presentation and no publications. I’ve been strongly considering a year-long post-bacc or a Master’s program to improve my GPA and to secure more solid recommendations, but I’m trying to avoid repetition (since the programs I’m looking at award Master’s while in the PhD program).

Any advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, BakedPotatoSoup said:

Any advice?

Your GRE scores are honestly solid, even for the higher tier programs. Also, many students admitted into a doctoral psychology program don't have any publications under their belt, so you don't have to worry much there. The main concern would be addressing your overall undergrad GPA, which isn't as bad as you perceive - it's still in the 3.0 range, and your major GPAs of 3.7 each are good.

I also had a similar background as you during undergrad; I was also a pre-medicine student who switched to psychology late into his college career. Talking with other psychology graduate students, this happens more than you'd realize - many of them were also former pre-med students. In my personal statements for doctoral Clinical Psychology program applications, I directly addressed my poor grades in pre-medicine coursework by explaining my lack of passion for those areas, and I described my journey of discovering psychology as my true calling. This seems to be the approach you should consider taking as well; I don't think a post-bacc or Master's program is necessary.

Instead of a post-bacc or Master's program, I'd suggest applying for paid RA positions in social psychology labs - preferably in a study similar to your area of research. Admissions committees for graduate psychology programs are strongly attracted to applicants with significant research experience in their area of interest. And if you manage to work for a private investigator who's well-connected with other Social Psychology professors in the field, you'd have won the jackpot ;-) 

In any case, this is some advice that helped me land an acceptance into my top-choice doctoral Clinical Psychology program ^_^ The road ahead may be difficult, but keep focused on your goals and don't be afraid to ask questions. I wish you the best!
 

Edited by JoePianist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/20/2016 at 1:31 PM, 2017cph said:

Hi everyone - thanks for all that you've been posting - it's so helpful to read. I'm applying this fall (2016) in hopes of gaining admission to a clinical psych PhD program for the fall of 2017. I know how competitive clinical psych programs are, but I want to just see what you guys think - do I have a realisitc shot? 

Major - Psych, Minor - Behavioral Neuroscience

GPA Overall - 3.71 / Major GPA - 3.94

GRE - 155(v) 158(q)

Research - 

  • psych research assistant for four years, 5+ conference presentations with the lab, pursuing an honors thesis in the lab
  • psych research assistant and two other labs, both clinical (for two summers)

Work / Intern

  • undergraduate intern at a psychiatric hospital developing interventions for children
  • student intern at the department of psychiatry in a major area hospital

University activities

  • head of student government academic affairs / student representative for the college 
  • EBoard member for undergraduate neuroscience researchers 

Honors

  • psi chi
  • nu rho psi
  • research fellowship
  • deans list 

 

just looking at the hard data, is it unrealistic to think I have shot? (personal statement aside)

any advice?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/9/2016 at 11:43 AM, 2017cph said:

any advice?

Hi there!  I applied to cognitive neuroscience programs last year, so my advice may not apply in your case (clinical psych programs tend to be considerably more competitive), but here are my two cents.

GPA

I was a bio/psych double major and had the same GPA as you (and like you, my psychology GPA was ~3.96).  I thought my middle-of-the-road cumulative GPA would keep me from being accepted to top PhD programs, but it ended up not mattering too much (I was accepted at 7/8 programs).  Granted, I think GPA is more important for top clinical psych programs, but a 3.71 on its own won't automatically keep you out.  Word of advice: focus on getting all A's during your senior year if possible.  If you have to reapply next year, this will definitely help your chances.

GRE

Your scores are a little low if you are gunning for a top 10 school but are otherwise within the interquartile range of many programs.  IMO, if you have the time and means I would recommend retaking for a higher score.  Your quant score isn't too bad for psych programs but verbal is a little low (160+ would be better).  It might also be worth taking the psychology subject GRE test.  While I doubt it'll make too much of a difference, a top score can help you stand out from the field.  I would prioritize classwork and research over the GREs, but if you didn't study much for it the first time you took it then it shouldn't be too hard to increase your score by a few points.  

Research/Work

It sounds like you have a lot of research experience.  This is a huge plus and will help you immensely.  Your work experience should also be helpful for clinical programs, especially at the interview stage.  

University Activities

I don't know if this matters a whole lot, but it's something you could highlight in your statement of purpose to demonstrate your drive, leadership qualities, organizational abilities, etc.  

 

Given all the research and work experience you have, I think you have a very good shot.  Prioritize getting stellar letters of recommendation--this is probably the single most effective thing you can do to increase your chances, and since you have worked in so many labs this should be pretty easy.  Also, go ahead and start writing your statement of purpose.  It doesn't need to be flashy or creative, just demonstrate that you are capable of doing high quality research by expounding on your research experience + any extracurriculars that are relevant.  If you have the time to study for it adequately, retaking the GRE is also worth doing in my opinion.  Finally, make sure that you apply to programs/PIs that are a good fit and apply to at least 10 schools.

Edited by St0chastic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello All!

 

I plan to apply for the Fall 2017 cycle. I am currently in a MA program, clinical psych. I have a forensic POI, however the school is in the process of gaining APA accreditation (2nd attempt) for the PhD program of which I've been accepted to. It's a Health Psych PhD program and although my current research merges Health/Law Enforcement I can gain more experience clinically from a school with more focus on the forensic field and more emphasis on developing clinical skills (forensic stuff-evals, assessment, etc.). 

This year I am looking for schools along the east coast, Texas, Alabama, St. Louis, and potentially Nebraska. My SO of 6 years lives in Maryland near DC and is Army/GradSchool so anything not too far from there gets preference. 

Stats:

BS: Psych with Criminal Justice Minor, currently enrolled in Clinical Psych MA program

1 year doing research with my current POI

1 conference in undergrad, one planned for fall '16 one for spring '17 and one for summer '17 (Posters and presentations)

I plan to defend my thesis this fall- health/law enforcement

1 year practicum experience in substance abuse treatment program at a local jail, and an undergraduate internship in probation and parole. I was a police dispatcher for 2 years in St.Louis, and currently work in records (got experience helping to proctor hiring exam). While in undergrad I was a resident assistant for 2 years.

My GPA is 3.5 undergrad, 3.7 Grad, GRE 301. V:156 Q:155 4.5 Writing

I want to get into a program where I can learn more clinical skills and get involved in a lab where I can expand on my talents and learn new skills, I don't mind re-taking courses especially in my weak areas. I am really trying to find some programs with a little more focus on diversity as well (part of why I attended an HBCU for my MA. 

Edited by AerialistPhD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/10/2016 at 7:31 PM, St0chastic said:

Hi there!  I applied to cognitive neuroscience programs last year, so my advice may not apply in your case (clinical psych programs tend to be considerably more competitive), but here are my two cents.

GPA

I was a bio/psych double major and had the same GPA as you (and like you, my psychology GPA was ~3.96).  I thought my middle-of-the-road cumulative GPA would keep me from being accepted to top PhD programs, but it ended up not mattering too much (I was accepted at 7/8 programs).  Granted, I think GPA is more important for top clinical psych programs, but a 3.71 on its own won't automatically keep you out.  Word of advice: focus on getting all A's during your senior year if possible.  If you have to reapply next year, this will definitely help your chances.

GRE

Your scores are a little low if you are gunning for a top 10 school but are otherwise within the interquartile range of many programs.  IMO, if you have the time and means I would recommend retaking for a higher score.  Your quant score isn't too bad for psych programs but verbal is a little low (160+ would be better).  It might also be worth taking the psychology subject GRE test.  While I doubt it'll make too much of a difference, a top score can help you stand out from the field.  I would prioritize classwork and research over the GREs, but if you didn't study much for it the first time you took it then it shouldn't be too hard to increase your score by a few points.  

Research/Work

It sounds like you have a lot of research experience.  This is a huge plus and will help you immensely.  Your work experience should also be helpful for clinical programs, especially at the interview stage.  

University Activities

I don't know if this matters a whole lot, but it's something you could highlight in your statement of purpose to demonstrate your drive, leadership qualities, organizational abilities, etc.  

 

Given all the research and work experience you have, I think you have a very good shot.  Prioritize getting stellar letters of recommendation--this is probably the single most effective thing you can do to increase your chances, and since you have worked in so many labs this should be pretty easy.  Also, go ahead and start writing your statement of purpose.  It doesn't need to be flashy or creative, just demonstrate that you are capable of doing high quality research by expounding on your research experience + any extracurriculars that are relevant.  If you have the time to study for it adequately, retaking the GRE is also worth doing in my opinion.  Finally, make sure that you apply to programs/PIs that are a good fit and apply to at least 10 schools.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read and write all of that! Your feedback means so much. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello all!

I have been reading your posts and it is quite nice to have a group of people in the same 'application' boat as me. Will we sink or float? only time will tell...

I was wondering if I could get some input from other members of the forum in regards to my application and what I can improve upon. I am applying in the area of Industrial-Organizational Psychology (Masters level or possibly a PhD program). Applications are due December-January and I have a small bit of time to improve upon my application. One of my biggest problems is deciding whether to extend my research experience vs keeping a job commitment working as a instructor therapist (but does not give research experience). My job commitment is full time which limits my opportunity to do other things- should I be not full-time employment while I work on other areas of my application? 

Below are my statistics, what do you think could use improvement? How competitive am I? 

GPA: 3.8 (could be 3.76 when converted, I am an 8.0 exactly in a 9.0 scale- which is an A)

I also have an advanced diploma (3 years) in behavioural sciences. I graduated with honours.
 

Research experience: 6 months (2 positions: one within literature review for elderly populations and another within a business school coding and entering data). I also have a small article published within a newsletter based upon a previous project that did not use any psychology statistics (but it was from a college program I previously attended). I have also completed a thesis from my undergrad.

Publications: None to boost about :(

Work experience: Non related directly to Industrial-Organizational Psychology but I have worked for about 3 years in the behavioural therapy field for children or adults with autism

References: I think I have 2 or 3 solid references but none from any of my research positions

GRE: (V- 156) or 71%, (Q-145) or 21%, (A- 5.5) or 98%. I know I have to up some of these scores, especially my Q.

Thanks for the input! it means a lot to me going forward :) more than I can put into words.

Edited by Seaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/6/2016 at 10:59 AM, PS7654 said:

Here are some people I would suggest looking into for those of you who are interested in clinical psych faculty with forensic and delinquency/criminal behavior interests (some are adult and some are juvenile-oriented):

 

Paul Frick, Louisiana State

 

In addition, check out conferences. Even if you don't attend you can usually find programs online. This could show you who is currently doing research you're interested in. I recommend the American Psychology & Law conference, specifically. It was just held last month.

 

I would avoid LSU at this point. It was a dream school of mine years ago but now I'm quite happy I did not end up down there. The APA has put their accreditation on probation following something. If you think of the degree mills out there that get accredited, whatever was happening down there must have been pretty bad.

Edited by Plasticity

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.