Jump to content
MerleSquirrel

I honestly can't afford a second bachelors/retaking classes.

Recommended Posts

I have a 2.78 overall and 3.1 CSD major. Now, I work as an assistant teacher. I did a year of AmeriCorps. I volunteer in the hospital. Taking the GRE soon. 

 

It's recommended that I re-take some CSD classes. However, I don't have the funds. I want to get into a Master's program and not add anymore debt before then. 

 

What else can I do to clean up my undergraduate mess? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try applying for 3 year programs? Even though you already have a background in it, maybe stating that you're able to prove yourself in X program's prerequisite/3 year program would help. I don't know how common it is, I just know that I'm doing this so hopefully it works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to sound too harsh here but your GPA will be the biggest factor working against you during graduate admissions. Especially when you are competing against many 3.8+ applicants. Your extra curricular activities are a good start. I'd recommend looking into shadowing an SLP (just gaining any experience in the actual field can be a plus as well as a way to make your personal statement more relevant). Keep studying for the GRE. Sometimes, great GRE scores can definitely make up for a less than stellar GPA. The general consensus is to get at least a 300 combined score on the Q/V sections and 4.0 on the AW section, but I absolutely recommend trying to score as high as you possibly can. 

Who recommended that you retake some CSD classes? Faculty? Admissions? If they were the ones recommending that you retake your courses, unfortunately, I think it'd be for the best to take that advice. I understand that classes can be very expensive and that you don't want to add on anymore debt. I worked 2-3 jobs during every year of school to be able to afford tuition, so I know how hard it can be sometimes. Do any community colleges offer CSD classes in your area? They are usually significantly cheaper. Perhaps you should hold off before applying because it can cost upwards of several hundred dollars per application cycle. You can then put that money towards retaking a couple classes? 

There are some people on this forum who have gotten accepted into a graduate program with your stats. Do your research. Use Edfind to filter out all the schools by acceptance rates and average GPA. You're probably not going to want to spend money applying to schools in California or New York, but there are many programs out there that focus on a more holistic application and not just concrete grades. Look for these programs. You may need to move out of state for a couple of years to do so, but in all honesty, I'd say it's worth it if you really want it. I see that you have a Bachelor's in CSD. Could you get a SLPA license in the meantime? 

I understand that you don't want to accumulate more debt, but unfortunately, with your current statistics, it will be an uphill battle. Please don't think that I am encouraging you to leave this field or that I am saying that you will never get in, but it's important to be realistic and have back up plans. I'd say keep studying for the GRE, keep trying to get experience, and keep in contact with your professors for those LORs. Look for the schools that have accepted applicants with your statistics in the past. But I also think it's important to look at other career choices in case this doesn't work out. I say this because I know several classmates from undergrad (in CSD) who spent years trying to get into a grad program but never did. Now they are scrambling to find another suitable career and have lamented the fact that they spent years and money on something that they knew would never work out. Be realistic about your life, but don't give up if this is what you really want, and do your best to show admissions how you have changed since undergrad. They want to know that you can succeed in their classes/clinics and your job is to show them that you can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you qualify for any tuition reimbursement through your job? Re-taking CSD courses won't help your GPA any more than taking different courses because CSDCAS will factor both grades into their calculation. So you might as well take classes towards a teaching credential if your employer will pay for those. SPED, Applied Behavioral Analysis, Clinical Rehab Services, or CLAD credential courses would be related enough to SLP that you could make a case that A's in them show your ability to handle grad school in SLP. And if you wind up finishing the credential, you can qualify for a better-paying job in the schools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Puffer Fish said:

Try applying for 3 year programs? Even though you already have a background in it, maybe stating that you're able to prove yourself in X program's prerequisite/3 year program would help. I don't know how common it is, I just know that I'm doing this so hopefully it works.

I have thought about this. One of my top school interests says it offers provisional admission for those who qualify. How do I inquire about this? Send an email to admissions asking if they would do a three-year track for someone who doesn't meet their minimum GPA?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MerleSquirrel said:

I have thought about this. One of my top school interests says it offers provisional admission for those who qualify. How do I inquire about this? Send an email to admissions asking if they would do a three-year track for someone who doesn't meet their minimum GPA?

In essence, yes, but phrasing is key. If you say it like that they're gonna be like this. If you can prove that your past grades do not reflect your current abilities and dedication, and that you need a second chance to prove yourself  (via their additional training in the three year program), they might be more willing to give you a shot. But just email them a short but polite message summarizing the above. Save all the real confidence building for your personal statement and/or letter writers. :D

Note: I have not been accepted yet but these are the efforts I am also trying in my apps (though my GPA is not below minimum...it's just barely AT minimum).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adding to what other posters have said, have things changed in your life to help you improve your GPA once in a graduate program?  No need to explain of course, but just curious if you are confident that this time around your grades would be much higher.  

The reason I ask is because graduate programs all have a minimum gpa (3.0 typically) that is required to graduate with a master's.  The reason schools shy away from people with lower gpa's is because they do not think you will graduate from their program, so they feel like they are wasting the spot on someone who is not guaranteed to succeed academically.  (This part is lame but it also makes their stats look bad to potential applicants if x% did not graduate from their program, so this is something some schools weigh)

That tied with the fact that graduate school is more demanding than undergrad academically at most schools puts you at a disadvantage.  I am not saying this to discourage you, but without all the information, I just think you should only apply if you know or have a strong reason to believe that your grades would improve/meet that standard in a graduate program.  

Goodluck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.