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kate775

More competitive for grad school?

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When reading through the previous threads I read that first and second time applicants are viewed the same. My question is does the fact that I will have completed my undergrad in Communicative Disorders in 3 years help my application in anyway? I currently have a 3.75 cumulative GPA and while my GRE scores currently aren't great they are average. I am however, taking the GRE again in two weeks. 

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I don't think that the admissions boards will look at how long it took you to finish your degree. I could be wrong, but I haven't heard anything about that being a factor in the application process.

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Even if graduating in 3 years did help, I believe the disadvantage from inherently having a year less of (research) experience would at best even it out, and more than likely hurt more.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought research experience was more important if trying to go for Ph.D.? The schools I am planning to apply to say they look for observation hours which I do have. Any insight on this?

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SLP is a clinical degree and most schools do not require a thesis. If you are interested in potentially doing a PhD. at some point, research would be important. Otherwise, I would focus on getting observation hours and related work/volunteer experience.

I did my 1st UG degree in 3 1/3 years because of finances and I don't think it will impact my chances at all.

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I don't think it will necessarily help you if you apply straight from UG. Yet, if you "use" the fourth year for gaining observation hours/experience/etc. and apply later on, then it will show that you got prepared beyond GPA/GRE. Scores are used to set a baseline but admission is based on more than that. 

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This is interesting because my advisor (I currently attend the University of Rhode Island) has directed me and many other students to the idea that GPA and GRE scores count significantly more than any other aspect of the application. He has actually discouraged people from getting internships and jobs because he says it is more important to focus on having a high GPA.

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4 hours ago, kate775 said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought research experience was more important if trying to go for Ph.D.? The schools I am planning to apply to say they look for observation hours which I do have. Any insight on this?

I'm not familiar with the field, but that is why I put research in parenthesis. I'm working under the assumption that there is some type of experience (eg. research, observation hours, internship, volunteer, etc) that benefits the application.

1 hour ago, kate775 said:

This is interesting because my advisor (I currently attend the University of Rhode Island) has directed me and many other students to the idea that GPA and GRE scores count significantly more than any other aspect of the application. He has actually discouraged people from getting internships and jobs because he says it is more important to focus on having a high GPA.

Once again, I am not familiar with the field, but my general impression was that for mid to low ranked schools GPA and GRE matter significantly more and may be one of the major factors. However, for top schools, since there are more than enough people with top GPA and GRE scores, they look to other things to distinguish candidates. In some sense, your advisor's advice still holds though, since having a good/decent GPA and GRE is usually necessary (but not sufficient) for better programs. It may also be worth noting that it is generally easier to get more experience versus raising your GPA, after you graduate.

Edited by Edotdl

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I finished my bachelors degree in 3 years, as did another girl in my undergrad program. It isn't going to be a game changer but it certainly doesn't hurt your application. I still had 100+ hours of research, all of my observation hours, and 7 clinical hours by graduation and having an extra year would not have helped me gain any more experiences due to how my undergrad program was designed. I don't recommend graduating early without talking to your CSD advisor first. They can look at you as a whole and determine if you are a good candidate to graduate/apply early.

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