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julianorts

What should matter most when choosing a program for SLP

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I'm currently applying as an out-of-field (psychology and Spanish double major) student to graduate programs that offer 1.) the opportunity to complete prerequisites upon admission and 2.) bilingual opportunities, whether that be through a specific certificate program or they verified that they offer bilingual placements. I obviously have no idea where I'm going to get accepted, if anywhere, but since I won't have much time and all the schools are far from me I want to have an IDEA of where I want to go and what I want to base my decision on once I know where I have been admitted. 

How important should I make each of the following factors in my decision?

1. Location (I'm from PA and go to school in OH, so I won't be close no matter what, but I'm thinking more in terms of where I'd be most happy)

2. Ranking (does this matter for SLP grad school at all?)

3. If they have a separate 3 yr program vs. just allowing me to take prerequisites with undergraduates (I think the former would be better, personally)

4. If they have a separate bilingual certificate program vs. having bilingual placement opportunities (again, the former would be better I think, but not 100% necessary)

Thanks in advance! My family members didn't go to grad school so I'm not really sure what's most important.

Edited by julianorts

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(1) Cost

(2) Bilingual specialty track

(3) Location

Ranking can help you with CF placement but bilingual SLP's are in demand so going to a lower-ranking school with a specialty track would help you more than going to a higher-ranking school without one.

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10 minutes ago, Crimson Wife said:

(1) Cost

(2) Bilingual specialty track

(3) Location

Ranking can help you with CF placement but bilingual SLP's are in demand so going to a lower-ranking school with a specialty track would help you more than going to a higher-ranking school without one.

So what if I get into one school that has a bilingual specialty track but it doesn't have a separate cohort for three year graduate students? Should I choose that over, say, a school like UVA that has a separate three year track and still has bilingual placement opportunities and is in a location I like?

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4 hours ago, julianorts said:

So what if I get into one school that has a bilingual specialty track but it doesn't have a separate cohort for three year graduate students? Should I choose that over, say, a school like UVA that has a separate three year track and still has bilingual placement opportunities and is in a location I like?

I'm not sure what you mean by "separate cohort for 3 year grad students"? Are you talking about an extended master's vs. a school with a post-bacc but separate admission to the master's like CSUN?

I don't understand why it would matter whether or not you're taking leveling classes with UG students so long as you've been admitted to the master's program.

Edited by Crimson Wife

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3 hours ago, Crimson Wife said:

I'm not sure what you mean by "separate cohort for 3 year grad students"? Are you talking about an extended master's vs. a school with a post-bacc but separate admission to the master's like CSUN?

I don't understand why it would matter whether or not you're taking leveling classes with UG students so long as you've been admitted to the master's program.

Basically- I'm talking about taking undergraduate courses vs taking them in a sort of leveling program with other grad students who are doing the same thing. At some schools if I were admitted I could possibly be the only one from out of field, and I feel like I'd struggle to take classes for a full year with people I won't get to know. Maybe that's just me but relationships are really important to me. There are only two schools I'm applying to (University of Arizona and New Mexico State) that offer both a 'leveling' PROGRAM (instead of just prereqs with undergrads) AND a bilingual specialization, but I'm not too fond of their locations so I'm not sure if I should just get over it and list them as first.

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I'm doing my leveling classes online as I see them as hoops to jump through in order to get into grad school and I want to do them in the most convenient and cheapest way possible. I've got a full life and certainly don't look to my classmates to provide socialization. That frankly seems a bit juvenile and when you're going to be investing $$$$$ in graduate education, you need to be pragmatic about what's going to provide the best return on your investment in terms of career opportunities.

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3 hours ago, Crimson Wife said:

I'm doing my leveling classes online as I see them as hoops to jump through in order to get into grad school and I want to do them in the most convenient and cheapest way possible. I've got a full life and certainly don't look to my classmates to provide socialization. That frankly seems a bit juvenile and when you're going to be investing $$$$$ in graduate education, you need to be pragmatic about what's going to provide the best return on your investment in terms of career opportunities.

As someone who already has a masters degree, I think being able to form relationships and get to know your classmates is a valid consideration. Grad school can be awfully lonely, and classmates can be a built-in support system. Should it be the only consideration and one that supersedes financial and other "pragmatic" concerns? No, of course not. But it's something that many people at least think about. Maybe it's less of a factor for someone who's already settled down with a family, though?

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On 11/26/2016 at 3:38 PM, Crimson Wife said:

I'm doing my leveling classes online as I see them as hoops to jump through in order to get into grad school and I want to do them in the most convenient and cheapest way possible. I've got a full life and certainly don't look to my classmates to provide socialization. That frankly seems a bit juvenile and when you're going to be investing $$$$$ in graduate education, you need to be pragmatic about what's going to provide the best return on your investment in terms of career opportunities.

I'm going to be moving to a state I've never even been to and at 22 years old in a new location, yeah, I do need to form a support group and find people who are in the same boat as me.

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Ranking doesn't matter when choosing an SLP master's program, my understanding is that rankings have to do with the school's research. One important consideration to make when selecting programs would be to look at the program's praxis pass rates, but that may be more helpful when initially selecting programs. 

Also, for me, when deciding where to apply, it was also important to consider cost of living in the location of the program, and what populations/opportunities that the school's clinic has to offer. Most programs have a link to their clinic on their website. I think for most people cost and location are the most important considerations, but that really depends on your income and amount of funding that the school may offer. 

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21 hours ago, panda1991 said:

Ranking doesn't matter when choosing an SLP master's program, my understanding is that rankings have to do with the school's research. One important consideration to make when selecting programs would be to look at the program's praxis pass rates, but that may be more helpful when initially selecting programs. 

Also, for me, when deciding where to apply, it was also important to consider cost of living in the location of the program, and what populations/opportunities that the school's clinic has to offer. Most programs have a link to their clinic on their website. I think for most people cost and location are the most important considerations, but that really depends on your income and amount of funding that the school may offer. 

Thanks so much! I wasn't sure if ranking mattered or not. I definitely want to look more into the cost of living. I think most are pretty affordable besides Emerson because it's in Boston, but I'm not confident on that. I think all of them have 100% or close to that passing rates. All of them are around the same cost but if I get a scholarship or something that'll definitely influence my decision.

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On 11/25/2016 at 6:08 PM, julianorts said:

Basically- I'm talking about taking undergraduate courses vs taking them in a sort of leveling program with other grad students who are doing the same thing. At some schools if I were admitted I could possibly be the only one from out of field, and I feel like I'd struggle to take classes for a full year with people I won't get to know. Maybe that's just me but relationships are really important to me. There are only two schools I'm applying to (University of Arizona and New Mexico State) that offer both a 'leveling' PROGRAM (instead of just prereqs with undergrads) AND a bilingual specialization, but I'm not too fond of their locations so I'm not sure if I should just get over it and list them as first.

FYI NM State's leveling program places all of the 'levelers' in the undergrad classes but there's usually a small group of levelers per year. If you're looking for bilingual, NM State would be great because of its close proximity to the border. My undergrad is from there and I had a great experience, but don't cut it out because you're not fond of where it is. It could be what stands between you and a great launching pad for a career. 

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1 hour ago, amsullivan said:

FYI NM State's leveling program places all of the 'levelers' in the undergrad classes but there's usually a small group of levelers per year. If you're looking for bilingual, NM State would be great because of its close proximity to the border. My undergrad is from there and I had a great experience, but don't cut it out because you're not fond of where it is. It could be what stands between you and a great launching pad for a career. 

Okay thanks for the info! I think I'd be okay there as long as there are other levelers. I'm concerned about a couple other programs but we'll just have to wait and see in March. Trying to keep an open mind as I have no idea where I'll get in so I'm trying not to get attached anywhere!

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19 minutes ago, julianorts said:

Okay thanks for the info! I think I'd be okay there as long as there are other levelers. I'm concerned about a couple other programs but we'll just have to wait and see in March. Trying to keep an open mind as I have no idea where I'll get in so I'm trying not to get attached anywhere!

There are! And I loved the professors there, they were my biggest cheerleaders when I got accepted to NYU's online program on Friday after being rejected everywhere last fall. 

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On 11/24/2016 at 8:41 PM, julianorts said:

I'm currently applying as an out-of-field (psychology and Spanish double major) student to graduate programs that offer 1.) the opportunity to complete prerequisites upon admission and 2.) bilingual opportunities, whether that be through a specific certificate program or they verified that they offer bilingual placements. I obviously have no idea where I'm going to get accepted, if anywhere, but since I won't have much time and all the schools are far from me I want to have an IDEA of where I want to go and what I want to base my decision on once I know where I have been admitted. 

How important should I make each of the following factors in my decision?

1. Location (I'm from PA and go to school in OH, so I won't be close no matter what, but I'm thinking more in terms of where I'd be most happy)

2. Ranking (does this matter for SLP grad school at all?)

3. If they have a separate 3 yr program vs. just allowing me to take prerequisites with undergraduates (I think the former would be better, personally)

4. If they have a separate bilingual certificate program vs. having bilingual placement opportunities (again, the former would be better I think, but not 100% necessary)

Thanks in advance! My family members didn't go to grad school so I'm not really sure what's most important.

All of the practicing SLP's I spoke with before grad school (at least a dozen) said "go to the most affordable school you can that will still let you earn your C's" and I think that's true. When I was observing in different settings, I saw SLP's from "top ranked" programs working alongside those from "mid" and "bottom" end programs. So, cost is big. 

Second, I think a program that allows you to complete your pre-reqs as a grad student (without re-applying) is a great option. 

Finally, the bilingual training is nice but not necessary. I talked with a few bilingual SLPs and most of them didn't have any special training - they said they learned a lot as they went. The consensus was the bilingual training is valuable, but not required. There's no national bilingual certificate/standard anyways. And finally, first and foremost you're going to be an SLP and you need SLP training - the bilingual part is extra. 

To summarize - I would use the following as rankings: 

1) Where you get in (Kind of a reminder not to count your chickens before they hatch) 

2) Most affordable

3) 3-year / pre-req included (to avoid cost, hassle, stress, time wasted reapplying)

4) bilingual 

 

I hope that helps! 

Also, the 6 schools I applied to (listed in my signature) all have bilingual tracks and admit students into the grad program who haven't completed all their pre-reqs. Looking back, I wouldn't have applied to T.C. Columbia (even if I had gotten in, it wouldn't have been worth the cost) and I think the same is probably true of Redlands. They're both so expensive! 

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Hello!  First of all good luck with your applications.  Second, everyone is different and while a social support system may be small chickens to some people it is what helps others thrive.  I was in a post-bacc where people were unfriendly and I really didn't like any aspects of that environment.  I am currently at a University that is the complete opposite and I am thriving my grades are great, i'm more positive and it helps me do better in clinic... and being someone that is halfway across the country from my home and family it is so important (imo). 

I think it's mature to know how you operate as a human and as a student and do your best to find a University that matches those aspects.  If you have any questions about UTD feel free to PM me!!  They do not have a Bilingual specialty tract but they do have 2 classes specifically on that topic one of which is a seminar, there is also a Bilingual lab that a few bilingual students work in. 

Also for leveling you have one full semester of leveling, in which all your classes are leveling coursework. The leveling girls seem to become very close, but those classes are done with some undergrads as well.  After that your second semester is Graduate level classes and maybe one or two leveling classes until they are all done.  You would start clinic your second semester.

For choosing a school I would say 1) Cost 2) Environment 3) Classes offered that match your career interests Good Luck!!

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I should throw this out but the university I went to for undergrad had their leveling students take the pre-reqs with undergraduates but they were still leveling students. There isn't a distinct class for the others. I'm sure it's possible, but there might be a lot of leveling students together in an undergraduate class.

And yeah, I know an audiologist who said as long as the school is accredited, the name doesn't matter (she said this holds true for SLP as well).

 

I know this is late, I figured I'd add my two cents.

EDIT: Just realized I wrote something here that other people said and that you are applying to my school so yeah University of Arizona does have leveling students in the undergrad classes. They all sat together so it was clear they were still a close group. If you have any questions about UofA/Arizona/Tucson, let me know!

Edited by maurmaur

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On February 11, 2017 at 8:24 PM, maurmaur said:

I should throw this out but the university I went to for undergrad had their leveling students take the pre-reqs with undergraduates but they were still leveling students. There isn't a distinct class for the others. I'm sure it's possible, but there might be a lot of leveling students together in an undergraduate class.

And yeah, I know an audiologist who said as long as the school is accredited, the name doesn't matter (she said this holds true for SLP as well).

 

I know this is late, I figured I'd add my two cents.

EDIT: Just realized I wrote something here that other people said and that you are applying to my school so yeah University of Arizona does have leveling students in the undergrad classes. They all sat together so it was clear they were still a close group. If you have any questions about UofA/Arizona/Tucson, let me know!

Hello! I am applying to the University of Arizona and it is my top choice so I would love some feedback. Do you know how harshly they judge the GRE quant score? Also, do you know if the stats of the leveling students tend to be higher or lower than those of the non-leveler students? Thank you so much! 

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On 11/26/2016 at 12:38 PM, Crimson Wife said:

I'm doing my leveling classes online as I see them as hoops to jump through in order to get into grad school and I want to do them in the most convenient and cheapest way possible. I've got a full life and certainly don't look to my classmates to provide socialization. That frankly seems a bit juvenile and when you're going to be investing $$$$$ in graduate education, you need to be pragmatic about what's going to provide the best return on your investment in terms of career opportunities.

I have to disagree. I’m an older grad student and I find nothing juvenile about wanting to form solid relationships with your classmates. You will be surprised at how much you will lean on your classmates for support. Grad school is difficult on so many different levels and I honestly wouldn’t have made it through my first semester without their support and friendship. I also already have a full life but your family and current friends will not fully understand what you are going through.

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