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Clear_Water

Choices for Fall 2017?

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Penn GSE (Teaching, Learning and Leadership) vs UMich School of Education (Teaching and Learning) vs HGSE (Learning and Teaching) vs Teachers College (Curriculum and Teaching)

All are 1 year programs.

Suggestions on which one I should opt for?

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All are very reputable programs. I'd take into consideration funding offers and stats on how quick/what specific positions (in relation to your interest) alum attain post program completion. I'd also find out the cities most students find jobs in post-completion if you're looking to relocate post-graduation to a specific location/city. One year goes by very quick, so you'll (potentially) be job searching before you know it!

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If you are looking to teach, I would go for the cheapest option among those three because they are all reputable and you will get a teaching job regardless.

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I am interested in better understanding how students in K-12 segments learn and how we can teach them more effectively. Keen on working outside the classroom in the spaces of online learning, teacher workshops and training etc.

@Vulpix - there are 4 programs that I am considering and not 3.

@emilb34 - totally agree! Every student I have interacted with from these colleges says the same thing about the length of the program. Thinking about working for a year in America (if I get a job) or returning to my home country (if not).

P.S. - I am an international student.

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@Clear_Water I'd go where you wouldn't mind living for more than a year, as it's easiest to get a job where you make connections, and you will make connections in graduate school (or should, anyhow). I thought with an Ivy master's I'd be able to get hired anywhere... Not necessarily true.

People you know get you jobs, and you will know people either in Boston, Philly, New York, or Ann Arbor. I picked my master's program (I was accepted at 3 of those you mention) based on where I wanted to live, not where I got the most money, and I have no regrets about that. All are great programs. Good luck!

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On 3/28/2017 at 4:44 PM, Vulpix said:

If you are looking to teach, I would go for the cheapest option among those three because they are all reputable and you will get a teaching job regardless.

This is excellent advice here. All four of the programs you mentioned are phenomenal. In the field of education, you want to get as little debt as possible.

 

@ Clear_Water - What are your long-term goals? What are you looking to do specifically within education? Are you looking to teach, go into education administration, curriculum, etc?

 

If you're looking to teach long-term, where you attend graduate school really doesn't matter. I have a Master degree from Johns Hopkins, and it is something that is overlooked on my resume usually. In some fields, simply having a master degree (doesn't matter where it is from) is necessary for mobility. Sometimes having a degree from a reputable university can open doors, but I'd argue one's drive, initiative, pursuit of internships, and charisma are more important factors.

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@Dracos

As mentioned in my earlier post: "I am interested in better understanding how students in K-12 segments learn and how we can teach them more effectively. Keen on working outside the classroom in the spaces of online learning, teacher workshops and training etc."

So, I don't wish to teach long term but am keen on impacting how students learn through effective curriculum design, pedagogy and teacher training

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@Dracos

Also, want to return and work in my home nation which doesn't pay people in the education sector too well! So, while finances are a definite consideration, I will only go to college once so I want the best experience possible! :)

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On 4/1/2017 at 2:11 AM, Clear_Water said:

@Dracos

Also, want to return and work in my home nation which doesn't pay people in the education sector too well! So, while finances are a definite consideration, I will only go to college once so I want the best experience possible! :)

If you're looking to "yolo" go for one of those programs and cost isn't a factor, I'd say go HGSE. Penn GSE, and Umich both have top ranked and highly respectable programs. I don't know which country is your native, or where you plan on settling, but Harvard has a worldwide name brand. Simply having it on your resume may open doors. 

My personal experiences so far being someone with a "prestigious" graduate school of education degree (from Johns Hopkins) has been that it has had a marginal impact, at best. The jobs I've been offered have been through my strong interview skills and relevant experiences rather than the name of the university on my degree. I do think that where I got my master degree has possibly helped me stick out in the "screening" phrase of interview process by making my resume stick out. Internationally, Harvard is a powerhouse. People might not know about how incredible Umich is, or the difference between Upenn and Penn State outside of the U.S unless they're an "academic" or someone really savvy about American universities. Harvard, however, is a name that definitely has a unique distinction. 

Have you looked at cheaper graduate schools of education, or programs which offer assistantships/better funding? Sure, the 1 year programs are nice because that's 1 less year you're in graduate school, but with how low many entry level education positions are, I strongly urge you to consider the implications of $50k+ in student loan debt if you haven't already. I know of people with over $100k in student loan debt working as teachers/administrators and there is a good student loan forgiveness route that many people utilize here in the states, but for someone internationally, the prospects of these degrees may simply not be worth it. 

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