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Hello, I am a political science undergrad student at a comprehensive university in Ontario, Canada. I currently possess a cumulative GPA of 3.78/4.00 and a major GPA of 3.91/4.00. I recently (two days ago) finished my 3rd out of 4 years of university and will be applying in September/October of 2017 with the marks I have already attained. 

I have work experience as a teaching and grading IR assistant at my university (going to be 8 months), as a trade policy intern at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC (4 months), as a legal intern for a prestigious international law firm (1 month),  and as a Corporate Affairs intern at a Fortune 500 company (4 months). In terms of university extracurriculars I am the President of my university's pre-law society. I also have three strong letters of recommendation from my professors who specialize in IR--they attended St. Andrews, UofT, and UCambridge respectively. 

My dream MSc program is The London School of Economics & Political Science MSc International Relations. As an aside, it is my goal to pursue a PhD and a career in academia after completing this program. I wanted to know (from individuals who have been accepted/rejected to this program or similar) what my chances are of being accepted? I am also applying to the MSc in Conflict Studies (second choice) so an estimate of my chances for that program would be most appreciated as well. 

Canadian LSE MSc Minimum GPA entry requirement: 3.3/4.0 (No GRE or GMAT required)

2017/2018 MSc International Relations acceptance rate: 11.14% (101/907)

2017/2018 MSc Conflict Studies acceptance rate: 17.14% (55/321)

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Isn't it quite easy to get into one of those programmes, I mean relatively? You are paying loads of £££ so they will welcome you with open arms. The same with King's, UCL, etc. But obviously don't apply only to LSE. 

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One thing to keep in mind is that acceptance rates are a really blunt and ineffective measure. Programs will get loads of applications, a lot of which aren't really 'credible' - applications submitted without all documents, applicants who barely scrapped a passing mark, applicants who misunderstand the purpose for the program, etc. You aren't really competing against the total number of applicants, but the total number of 'serious' applicants.

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