Jump to content
Guest

Boston & Cambridge, MA

Recommended Posts

Is it possible to find places near Boston College with an August 1 move in date? It sounds like they are all arranged for May 1 or Sept. 1 move-ins...

I was just talking to a broker about this, and she said it's much easier to find housing around Boston College with a Sept. 1 date- August dates are rare. I have, however, seen a few June dates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it possible to find places near Boston College with an August 1 move in date? It sounds like they are all arranged for May 1 or Sept. 1 move-ins...

Unless you find a sublet that will allow you to move in earlier (which might still require you to sign a September 1-August 31 lease), it's almost impossible to find anything outside of that right in the city. BC is easily accessible from other areas by car, however, and these have a lot more wiggle room. Additionally, if you live in a big apartment building that has people moving in and out all around the year, that would solve your problem as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey all, there is a facebook group for new grad students in Boston/Cambridge: http://www.facebook.com/groups/417852061575938/

Description:

Group for individuals starting grad school in Boston in 2012. Any and all schools, programs, majors, etc welcome. Hopefully this group will be a good resource for meetups, finding roommates, activities, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless you find a sublet that will allow you to move in earlier (which might still require you to sign a September 1-August 31 lease), it's almost impossible to find anything outside of that right in the city. BC is easily accessible from other areas by car, however, and these have a lot more wiggle room. Additionally, if you live in a big apartment building that has people moving in and out all around the year, that would solve your problem as well.

Not sure about "impossible". My apartment had an August 1st move-in date, as did many I viewed -- I think realtors trying to appeal to a non-student clientele often have June, July and August 1st start dates, I saw many in Brookline, for instance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks, my plans changed and I now have some flexability about when I go to Cambridge to hunt for a place. When do you think is the absolute BEST time to go and look for a place? I am primarily going to be looking in Central Square and Kendall Square

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I are starting grad school at MIT this Summer (i.e. June). The MIT Family housing options seem to be real old apartments, and there seems to be some sort of lottery going on to get them. We have our own furniture, so are looking for unfurnished 1 bedroom apartments (around 500-700 sq ft). We thought that it might be a good idea to sublet an apartment for the Summer and then look for a place for Fall while we are there, but most sublets are furnished places as the owners come back at the end of Summer. We are willing to pay up to $ 1800, but ideally less for a nice and clean apartment in a nice neighborhood; preferably including AC, heat, hot water; it would indeed be awesome if other utilities such as electricity, internet, and cable also be included. However, it is real hard to figure if an apartment or its neighborhood is good from craigslist. From what I've heard so far Porter Sq and Brookline seem to be nice neighborhoods, but Brookline is a 40 min commute to MIT, and Green line doesn't seem to be reliable. So, where do you think would be an ideal place within a reliable 30 min commute? Also, I haven't had any success in finding an apartment with washer/dryer inside unit; do you think it would be unreasonable to ask for it for $ 1800 a month? I appreciate if you guys could make any suggestions. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those already living in the Boston area:

What do you guys think about living slightly outside the city? I'll be starting at Northeastern in the fall, and just like everyone else in this forum, I am grossed out by how expensive housing is. If I'm going to pay that much, I'd like to get a little more for my money.. I know the commute will depend on the area, but would 30-40 minutes be so bad for the first year of a PhD program?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are willing to pay up to $ 1800, but ideally less for a nice and clean apartment in a nice neighborhood; preferably including AC, heat, hot water; it would indeed be awesome if other utilities such as electricity, internet, and cable also be included.

I was thinking that your requirements didn't seem unreasonable. $1800 or less for a 1-bed in a not-high-crime neighborhood? Sure, that's definitely doable. Then you put in the thing about wanting that $1800 to include AC, heat, hot water, and maybe electricity, Internet, and cable. You aren't going to find a lot of apartments that include all those things with the rental cost. Period. You might find one that includes utilities, though.

Not many apartments in the Boston area have central AC to begin with, let alone covered in the rent, unless they're in pretty new buildings, which most are not. It drives me crazy, since I grew up in the Southeast, where we maintain a civilized difference between indoor and outdoor temperature. ;)

Cambridgeport and Porter Square seem like likely places. Possibly Union Square and Inman Square as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see anything about this on recent pages and I'm too lazy to read through all 26 pages of the thread, so I apologize if someone has already answered my question.

Anyone know how parking works in Boston? I'm moving there for the fall semester from Philadelphia and it seems like there are a lot of rules about parking that I just don't understand. I don't plan on driving very often at all, but I would like to take my car with me when I move in case I do need to drive somewhere or to drive myself home for occasional visits. Can someone explain the rules to me as if I were a ten-year-old child, please?

On a similar note, how is public transportation in Boston, specifically the subway system? Will it be easy for me to access different parts of the city via public transportation? I'm going to BU and will likely live in a nearby area, but I'm sure there will be times when I want to branch out a bit. Are there areas around BU that provide greater access to public transportation than others? That could factor in to where I decide to live.

Speaking of living arrangements, it seems like Allston is a popular, reasonably priced neighborhood for BU students. I'm just coming out of undergrad, so I'm fairly confident that I would be okay with living in an area that is heavily populated by students. However, I am concerned about safety because I am new to the city and I am a relatively young, petite female. My undergrad school is in a pretty rough part of Philly, so I know how to handle myself in a high-er crime area, but I'm not used to living off campus. Assuming I'm not doing something ridiculous, like drunkenly stumbling down the middle of the road by myself at 2am or whatever, will I have to be particularly cautious in this neighborhood?

These questions may seem kind of silly, but I've only been to Boston once before, so I know very little about the city and prefer getting my information from people who actually live there, you know? Anyway, anything you can tell me will probably be helpful. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't see anything about this on recent pages and I'm too lazy to read through all 26 pages of the thread, so I apologize if someone has already answered my question.

Anyone know how parking works in Boston? I'm moving there for the fall semester from Philadelphia and it seems like there are a lot of rules about parking that I just don't understand. I don't plan on driving very often at all, but I would like to take my car with me when I move in case I do need to drive somewhere or to drive myself home for occasional visits. Can someone explain the rules to me as if I were a ten-year-old child, please?

On a similar note, how is public transportation in Boston, specifically the subway system? Will it be easy for me to access different parts of the city via public transportation? I'm going to BU and will likely live in a nearby area, but I'm sure there will be times when I want to branch out a bit. Are there areas around BU that provide greater access to public transportation than others? That could factor in to where I decide to live.

Speaking of living arrangements, it seems like Allston is a popular, reasonably priced neighborhood for BU students. I'm just coming out of undergrad, so I'm fairly confident that I would be okay with living in an area that is heavily populated by students. However, I am concerned about safety because I am new to the city and I am a relatively young, petite female. My undergrad school is in a pretty rough part of Philly, so I know how to handle myself in a high-er crime area, but I'm not used to living off campus. Assuming I'm not doing something ridiculous, like drunkenly stumbling down the middle of the road by myself at 2am or whatever, will I have to be particularly cautious in this neighborhood?

These questions may seem kind of silly, but I've only been to Boston once before, so I know very little about the city and prefer getting my information from people who actually live there, you know? Anyway, anything you can tell me will probably be helpful. Thank you.

Hey- I might be the perfect person to answer this question, because I grew up outside of Philly but have been in Boston for the last four years and will be staying on for at least one more, if not the rest of my life.

As far as how parking works in Boston: It doesn't. If you want to have a car, you have no choice but to live outside of the city, because monthly parking spaces here cost as much as rent (not exaggerating). All other parking is either in extraordinarily expensive garages, or is one- or two-hour parking, both of which are strictly enforced. Driving in Boston is also hell- there's an overabundance of one-way streets, and everything that you've likely heard about Massachusetts drivers (affectionately named "Massholes") is completely true, particularly if you have out-of-state license plates.

Here's the good news: Boston's public transportation system is absolutely fantastic. As a BU student, you're right: By far, the best place to live is the Allston/Brighton area, which is on the B branch of the Green Line (the mostly-above-ground subway that covers the downtown area and the western reaches of Boston). A monthly pass is $59, and it's well worth it. The B line is the least efficient just because so many students depend on it every day, but it comes about every 8 minutes and is by far the best way to get around. I lived on the border of Allston and Brighton and depended on the B line for a year and a half.

As far as getting home goes (I assume that "home" is Philly for you?), I can also give you advice on this one: Your options, both totally viable, are to either take the Amtrak Northeast Regional line (which is a little expensive depending on demand and the time of year, and which is also a fairly long ride- takes about as long as driving sometimes) or to fly. The bad news about flights is that for a year and a half, Southwest was flying between Boston and Philly for pretty cheap- but they just stopped running that route because not enough people were taking it (I was so pissed!!!). Now, you can take US Airways for about $100 each way, which isn't horrible and takes about an hour of in-flight time... no complaints there. The airport is easy to get to via public transportation as well, or you can take a cab for fairly cheap.

For when you do want to get out of the city, you can rent a ZipCar (which many Bostonians swear by- I've never done it personally, because I've always found public transit to be sufficient) or take the commuter rail, which runs to most destinations throughout the eastern half of the state (but no one likes western Massachusetts anyway). You can find out anything you need to know about getting around by going to MBTA.com, or by using the public transportation map on Google Maps (which I actually use more often than the official MBTA website because it tells you when the next train is coming). So my opinion should be pretty clear to you by now: Don't bring your car. It will cause you so much unnecessary stress, and Boston has the best public transportation of any city that I've been to (besides New York, because it's New York). You'll always be able to get home by taking the train or flying, and if you do want to get out of the city, there are definite ways for that as well.

As far as living in Allston goes: Boston is ALWAYS safer than Philly, no matter where you live (with the exception of some places in South Boston, which you don't have to worry about as a BU student). All that you have to worry about in Allston is drunk BU and BC students stumbling around and doing what drunk college students do. While obviously, you always want to be careful, I never had a bad experience during my time in Allston/Brighton.

A quick geography lesson: The green line, like I said, goes through the city, and then branches off into the B, C, D, and E lines. The B line has several stops right in the middle of BU, and then goes through Allston center, parts of Brighton, and then ends at Boston College. You would be fine living in either Allston or Brighton- Allston is closer to BU, but is slightly more crowded and city-like. Brighton is marginally less so and has some really pretty parts, including the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, which is great for walking around in nice weather. It honestly just depends on where you can find an apartment, because you will pretty much have to live with one or two roommates, no matter where you go, unless you want to pay over $1000 a month.

Let me know if you have any more questions. I went to Berklee (right in the heart of Boston, in the Back Bay neighborhood), am just about to graduate from UMass Boston (in South Boston), and will be attending Brandeis for my MA and possibly my Ph.D. next year. I've lived in Back Bay, Beacon Hill, and Allston/Brighton while taking every possible form of public transit, and I'll be moving to Natick (which is in MetroWest, an area of suburbs west of Boston where tons of people commute from every day) and getting a car for the first time this summer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Everyone!

I'm going to BU next fall for my master's in counseling. I'm moving from Chicago and looking for a place to live. So if anyone needs a roommate, message me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Help! Is Waltham really such a terrible place to live? If it is where my school is located, has good restaurants and an interesting movie theater, has buses/train into Boston, and has lower rent - why is it so bad? Would I be foolish to move there (with my husband, who will be working from home)? It SOUNDS okay...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Waltham's not a terrible place to live, just suffers greatly in comparison. If you are friends with a lot of other Brandeis students who live in Cambridge/Somerville and have social events out there, you'll find it's a trek to get in there and back out in the evening (infrequent trains/buses) or will have to drive in and deal with resident only parking in a lot of neighborhoods. This social inconvenience factor was what led some of the students I know at Brandeis to move to Porter Square. If you and your husband have a social life that isn't concentrated in Camberville (for instance, if most other students you are friends with live in Waltham), then you won't mind it as much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

MIT just did a rent analysis for their grad students and found that rent has on average increased by 7.5% in the last two years. Most live in Boston, Somerville, and Cambridge, probably weighted most towards Somerville. Buying is looking better and better. I can also say with conviction that finding and living in an apartment in the city of Boston (which is cheaper than Somerville or Cambridge by a long shot) have been the two most stressful and soul crushing experiences of my life. If you have a family or value sleep, run for the hills!

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Help! Is Waltham really such a terrible place to live? If it is where my school is located, has good restaurants and an interesting movie theater, has buses/train into Boston, and has lower rent - why is it so bad? Would I be foolish to move there (with my husband, who will be working from home)? It SOUNDS okay...

^ Waltham's not a terrible place to live, just suffers greatly in comparison. If you are friends with a lot of other Brandeis students who live in Cambridge/Somerville and have social events out there, you'll find it's a trek to get in there and back out in the evening (infrequent trains/buses) or will have to drive in and deal with resident only parking in a lot of neighborhoods. This social inconvenience factor was what led some of the students I know at Brandeis to move to Porter Square. If you and your husband have a social life that isn't concentrated in Camberville (for instance, if most other students you are friends with live in Waltham), then you won't mind it as much.

I lived in Waltham for my UG years and I basically agree with @wine. If Boston weren't right there, Waltham would be a perfectly adequate college town with (ample) restaurants, book stores, bars, a movie theater, grocery stores, cafe, green spaces, etc. However, unless you really want to walk to class every day, there is little reason to live in Waltham and not Porter Sq. The commuter rail is a 20 minute ride that costs $4.50 each way (I think savings with a monthly pass are minimal). It comes every 2 hours or so, maybe every hour during rush hour. So it's a trade-off between living really close to the campus and commuting in to do urban things in Boston, on the one hand, or living in a semi-urban setting in Cambridge and commuting out to school, on the other. I think either way is pretty close to an ideal situation. Neither scenario would even approach "terrible" (many people commute much much farther than 20 minutes to get to school/urban center in this country).

I went to Brandeis and I live in Cambridge now. Any time I get on the commuter rail stop in Porter Sq., there are tons of grad students heading into campus. So it's simple enough. At the same time, I lived a fairly mature lifestyle as a UG at Brandeis (e.g. studied in the cafes, went to Cambridge/Boston on the weekends, avoided frat parties like a plague) and was mostly satisfied with the situation. However, as @wine said, there's really no reason to opt to live in Waltham unless (a) you really want the convenience of being to walk to and from class or (B) most of your friends are in Waltham. Ultimately, those two factors will probably make or break either locale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know, if it will be difficult to find a place to stay with a lease that is only for the academic year? In other words, will most places have a lease that goes from September to September?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not everytwhere has a Sept to Sept lease, but anything less than one year is most likely an "at will" tenancy, which are rare enough that I wouldn't hold out any hope of finding one. This is why there are so many summer sublets in Boston.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply, Usmivka, even though it was not what I was hoping for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Logistical question about September 1 being the most common moving day: How does this work? If everyone moves on September 1 how do people manage to move out of their old apartment in time for the new tenants to move in? Do landlords/outgoing tenants not need time to clean the apartment in between? Even without that it seems like there'd be chaos if you tried to move before the tenants had quite left your new place, or weren't done moving by the time the new tenants arrive at your old place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Logistical question about September 1 being the most common moving day: How does this work? If everyone moves on September 1 how do people manage to move out of their old apartment in time for the new tenants to move in? Do landlords/outgoing tenants not need time to clean the apartment in between? Even without that it seems like there'd be chaos if you tried to move before the tenants had quite left your new place, or weren't done moving by the time the new tenants arrive at your old place.

Answering in order:

1. There is sometimes a few days of slack--someone moves early, apartment is vacant, etc. The lease may say Sept 1, but you can often move in early if it is vacant. Also, not everything is Sept 1, just a lot of it.

2. Landlords with Sept 1 lease dates rarely clean--they require the tenants to do so when they leave. So in practice, this doesn't happen at all. Plan to clean your new apartment thouroughly, who knows what crud the last folks left.

3. There is chaos. Plan to have your stuff packed the night before, and coordinate with the people at either end of the move. You may be able to work out a deal where they help you load, you help them unload, or vice versa at the other end.

Important! Reserve your moving truck at least 2 months in advance, or you will have to drive way outside the city to get one. Lots of folks cant get a truck, so they abandon much of their furniture on the curbside. In the student dense area of Allston, this phenomenon is known as "Allston Christmas." Anything on the curb is free for the taking, but may have bedbugs or other nasty surprises. This is why bedbug infestations in Boston spike in September.

Edited by Usmivka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply, Usmivka, even though it was not what I was hoping for.

You could try getting a May or June lease, then subletting your place for the summer. Or you could move into a room in a house someone else is leasing, then you'd never be responsible for the lease and the time you aren't there. But many leases forbid sublets, so you could find yourself evicted on short notice with few rights if you don't check with the landlord first.

Also, if anyone is looking for an apartment in Boston this Fall:

My noisey upstairs neighbors are not being permitted to renew their lease. Great news for me! To avoid getting similarly crummy neighbors in the future, I thought I'd advertise here. It is a two level 3 bedroom (one is a master suite, big enough for 2 people on its own) unit in Jamaica Plain, available this Sept 1 or earlier. It is super convenient to Longwood Medical, the VA, two T lines, and shuttles to Harvard and the BU Medical campus/Boston Medical Center. It is also convenient to the bike trail, and I bike to MIT in 25-30 minutes. PM me if you want to know more about the unit, landlord, whatever. I'd love to find good neighbors, and love the area, so it is worth my time to talk it up to you!

Edited by Usmivka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Answering in order:

1. There is sometimes a few days of slack--someone moves early, apartment is vacant, etc. The lease may say Sept 1, but you can often move in early if it is vacant. Also, not everything is Sept 1, just a lot of it.

2. Landlords with Sept 1 lease dates rarely clean--they require the tenants to do so when they leave. So in practice, this doesn't happen at all. Plan to clean your new apartment thouroughly, who knows what crud the last folks left.

3. There is chaos. Plan to have your stuff packed the night before, and coordinate with the people at either end of the move. You may be able to work out a deal where they help you load, you help them unload, or vice versa at the other end.

Important! Reserve your moving truck at least 2 months in advance, or you will have to drive way outside the city to get one. Lots of folks cant get a truck, so they abandon much of their furniture on the curbside. In the student dense area of Allston, this phenomenon is known as "Allston Christmas." Anything on the curb is free for the taking, but may have bedbugs or other nasty surprises. This is why bedbug infestations in Boston spike in September.

I can verify ALL of this. September 1 is absolutely crazy, and the only way around it is to either find the rare apartment that has a different move-in date (the likelihood of which is astronomically higher outside of the city), or to try to arrange something with the old tenants. For instance, I just moved from Beacon Hill to Natick, and in order to avoid the September 1 craze and to be moved into my new apartment before grad school starts in the fall, I had my realty company contact the new tenant and ask if he would be interested in moving in two months early. Thank GOD, he was able to move in on July 1, and I even got out a few days early so that he could start moving his stuff in because my new apartment complex has monthly leases that don't all start in September because it's a commuter area rather than a student-heavy area.

And indeed, the landlords don't clean the apartments in between- it's totally up to both the old and new tenants. It's expected that the old tenant will clean thoroughly before they leave, but you can't rely on that- expect to clean your old apartment when you move out, and then your new apartment when you move in. If you don't clean your old place and the new tenant complains, you could lose a portion of your security deposit, so that helps to keep people somewhat accountable.

Also, DEFINITELY, DEFINITELY try to book a U-Haul waaaay ahead of time, as it is true that all of the ones in the city get booked at least two months (if not more) in advance of September 1 and the days on either side of that date. In other words, if you know where you're moving, book right now- do not put it off!!

The September 1 moving disaster definitely requires a lot of planning ahead and coordinating between tenants, because it's pretty impossible to not overlap. The best way to go about this is to try to get the contact info of the new tenants if you're moving out, or vice-versa. With my apartment when I lived in Allston (Allston Christmas is real! but beware!), the new tenants and I exchanged contact info when they were viewing my apartment- none of them could move in during the day because of work, so I allowed them to start moving in the night before, while I had my stuff all packed up and ready to move during the day the next day. It's necessary to arrange with the new tenants a time when one of you can be moving out, so that the other isn't trying to move in at the same time. If your realty company or landlord won't give you the new person's contact info, they can also serve as a go-between for you to work something out.

It does work out every year, somehow. My major take-home point for surviving it is to plan ahead, in as much detail as possible. This includes:

-Reserving a UHaul months in advance

-Figuring out who is helping you move (including someone who feels comfortable driving a truck through the city) and making sure they won't ditch you last-minute so that you can get out as quickly as possible

-Getting the contact information of the new/old tenants, and working out moving times (NOT on September 1, if possible- is it possible for one of you to move some of your stuff a day or two early?)

-Cleaning the apartment for the new tenant, beginning BEFORE the day of the move

-Having everything packed up and ready to go BEFORE September 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another shameless plug:

I'm moving from my apartment in Jamaica Plain in mid-October (5 min to E line, 10 to Orange). I really love the area, and am in fact moving to a condo 2 blocks away (couldn't pass up the offer price wise, otherwise I'd be in this apartment until I finished grad school). It is a 2 bedroom on a dead end street surrounded by parks and community gardens, currently going for $1300. If anyone is interested in that area and time-frame (up to + a month or two, I'm flexible), let me know. I have one person I know interested who needs a co-renter if you are excited but want a housemate. PM me if you want specifics, a rave review, and the dish on how this area works or doesn't work for area Universities and medical centers. Feel free to share with friends who want to move out of grad dorms or don't like their current sublets. I can partially furnish if needed.

Edited by Usmivka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello! I am planning a move to the Boston area next summer to start grad school in the fall. My top choice school is Salem State University, and my mother lives in Saugus, MA. I, however, have lived in Texas my entire life. Basically, everything I know about New England comes from articles online. To put it simply, I need anything and everything you have to offer.

The basics:

My boyfriend of 6 years and his younger sister are coming with me (we all get along great, have lived together for the last six months, and have no problems with everyone chipping in for their share of the bills/expenses). They are both applying to Salem State as undergrads, and I'm applying for a MA in history. My boyfriend and I both work part-time in retail right now, and have been working for the same store for 2 years. Our boss has already assured us that they can transfer us to a store in our new city, and my boyfriend's sister will be looking for a part-time job when we arrive (her parents pay her portion of the bills right now, since she's the baby of the family and the only girl =P). I'll be looking for a better/higher paying job since I'll have my bachelor's degree when I arrive, but for the time being my current job will have to suffice.

What we're looking for:

Since we're planning on going to school in Salem, we'd like to live close by. Right now we live in San Antonio, TX, and it's about a 15 minute commute to school and work. The commute up north is something my mom has already warned me about, but ideally we'd like to live within a half hour of the school. We pay just under $700 right now for a 2bd/2ba 900 sqft apartment, and we have a 15 lb dachshund and a cat. Since we'll be working with roughly the same income when we move, something as close to this as possible would be ideal. However, we know that the cost of living is higher up there, and our parents are willing to help out if necessary until we can find better/higher paying jobs.

So, I guess what I'd like to know is if anyone has suggestions for what areas we should be looking in, and what we can realistically expect to pay for an apartment up there. And, of course, any info you have to share about the area in general would be more than welcome!

(Sorry for the wall of text!)

(I guess I should also add that mother owns a home in Saugus, and has a fully finished basement apartment with 2bd/1ba and a fireplace. She's offered to let us use it rent free if we just pay for the utilities. She's had it listed for sale for awhile now with no luck, but it would give us a place to live so we can take our time apartment hunting and getting more familiar with the area.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you definitely going to have a car? That's one part of the cost of living that's definitely higher than in Texas, but if you've already made the decision to have one, then you might as well live rent-free in Saugus.

Personally, I avoid having a car at all costs, and could point you to some less-expensive places along the T, but that wouldn't help much in terms of getting to Salem State-- unless there's good transit between campus and the commuter rail station?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.