Jump to content
  • 0

SMP (medical science-heavy masters) vs. Traditional Masters (i.e. Biology, M.S.)? pre-PhD


hypocraticoath

Question

Hello! I hope you're all doing well!

Sorry for the dumb question, but it's a burning question!

I have been premed up until recently when I started contemplating the PhD route since I love teaching and am thinking that I do not want my whole life to revolve solely around medicine and heavy hour workweeks, hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt, etc. I just feel like I would be happier as a college professor who puts out entertaining and educational content on online platforms like YouTube, a blog, etc. 

Do not get me wrong, I completely understand that the PhD route is difficult and is not for the faint-hearted. I've done a lot of research and know that this route comes with its own challenges like the securing funding, grant-writing, securing a tenure position, politics in academia, etc. 

My stats are on the lower side, therefore I am not applying to programs yet and need to improve my application. I was accepted to a special masters program at a good university. SMPs, for those that do not know what they are, are masters programs primarily built on getting attendees accepted to U.S. medical schools. Even though this program is very rigorous and has a lab-based research thesis component, would a traditional masters program be better suited for someone who is pre-PhD instead of pre-MD/pre-DO? In other words, should I apply to non-SMP masters programs? I am looking at Biology M.S. programs and am really enticed by Boston University's Vesalius Neurobiology and Anatomy M.S. program.

Masters programs, in general, are quite expensive and usually are bereft of the opportunities for funding/financial assistance that PhD programs are, so I want to be wise when I make this decision. 

 

Thank you and don't hesitate to ask for any clarification!

- hypocraticoath

Link to comment
Share on other sites

0 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

There have been no answers to this question yet

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. See our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use