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UT Austin - Community and Regional Planning


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I have been doing some research on some of the schools I have been accepted to, and UT-Austin is one of them. One of my concerns is that the title of the program, for some reason, comes off weak. Why not City and Regional Planning like its UT-Arlington counterpart? Also, the fact that it's located in a school of Architecture bothers me a little. I know that this is a Tier 1 school, but does the Community and Regional Planning degree hold wait from UT? I really wish I felt more confident about the school, because Austin, TX is such a great city. I would love to live there. Can somebody offer me some insight into prestige or lack there of? I have been going over the website intensely, but not a lot seems to catch my eye compared to GATech's, Rutger's, or UNC's website.

Anyways, any information would be appreciated. I was just thinking today how I have never been at a bigger crossroad in my life than in the next 30 days. It's excitement, anxiety, fear and hope all rolled into one.

Edited by nateakadino
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I have been doing some research on some of the schools I have been accepted to, and UT-Austin is one of them. One of my concerns is that the title of the program, for some reason, comes off weak. Why not City and Regional Planning like its UT-Arlington counterpart? Also, the fact that it's located in a school of Architecture bothers me a little. I know that this is a Tier 1 school, but does the Community and Regional Planning degree hold wait from UT? I really wish I felt more confident about the school, because Austin, TX is such a great city. I would love to live there. Can somebody offer me some insight into prestige or lack there of? I have been going over the website intensely, but not a lot seems to catch my eye compared to GATech's, Rutger's, or UNC's website.

Anyways, any information would be appreciated. I was just thinking today how I have never been at a bigger crossroad in my life than in the next 30 days. It's excitement, anxiety, fear and hope all rolled into one.

In my opinion, the fact that it is located within the school of architecture makes it that much better of a program. Typically, you will find that the best (or most interesting) planning programs are those that are part of an interdisciplinary department (architecture, real esate development, planning, etc..). I think you will find your schooling much more interesting by choosing a program that is not stand alone. If it is a stand alone program, it is probably more oriented towards policy, administration, or economics. With a program like planning you really have to research the professors and visit the school if at all possible to get a sense of resources and curriculum. I have an undergraduate degree in planning (and thought I might continue with it), but ultimately decided to apply for a master of architecture...so I've done some of the same research and had some of the same questions as you.

On another note, the name of the program does not matter at all. Some are old school like "Master of Urban Planning" and some are newer like "community and regional planning." It is just a name and I wouldn't be concerned about it.

GATech and UNC are probably the highest ranked national universities in your list...and probably have the largest endowments, but they may not be the best for planning. Although, I know that Chapel Hill is highly ranked for planning. At any rate, a planning degree is a planning degree and I imagine they will all be quite similar unless you are able to get into a school like MIT or Harvard.

Also don't discount the quality of life factor. This was a huge decision for myself when deciding where to go...there were schools I liked, but they were outside of my target geographic area and so I did not apply to those.

Best of luck on deciding where to go!

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In my opinion, the fact that it is located within the school of architecture makes it that much better of a program. Typically, you will find that the best (or most interesting) planning programs are those that are part of an interdisciplinary department (architecture, real esate development, planning, etc..). I think you will find your schooling much more interesting by choosing a program that is not stand alone. If it is a stand alone program, it is probably more oriented towards policy, administration, or economics. With a program like planning you really have to research the professors and visit the school if at all possible to get a sense of resources and curriculum. I have an undergraduate degree in planning (and thought I might continue with it), but ultimately decided to apply for a master of architecture...so I've done some of the same research and had some of the same questions as you.

On another note, the name of the program does not matter at all. Some are old school like "Master of Urban Planning" and some are newer like "community and regional planning." It is just a name and I wouldn't be concerned about it.

GATech and UNC are probably the highest ranked national universities in your list...and probably have the largest endowments, but they may not be the best for planning. Although, I know that Chapel Hill is highly ranked for planning. At any rate, a planning degree is a planning degree and I imagine they will all be quite similar unless you are able to get into a school like MIT or Harvard.

Also don't discount the quality of life factor. This was a huge decision for myself when deciding where to go...there were schools I liked, but they were outside of my target geographic area and so I did not apply to those.

Best of luck on deciding where to go!

Thanks a lot. I definitely appreciate hearing a voice of reason- especially when my mind is racing over all kinds of imagined possibilities.

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