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PhD in developmental biology


shadowxx
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Hi All, Pleasure to join such a great community!

I graduated with a bachelors in Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2006 with a GPA of 3.8 and had one paper accepted (2nd author). I applied to several biology schools but was rejecting because of a low GRE.

Now I am applied in a master's program in synthetic organic chemistry. I am planning on graduating a masters from this program with 3 papers (two 2nd author and one 1st author). I am planning on applying to several developmental biology programs for the fall '10 semester. I am also preparring to study for the GRE again.

These are the schools that I am currently intersted in:

1.) Sloan Kettering Program in Cancer biology

http://www.sloankettering.edu/gerstner/html/50725.cfm

2.) Columbia program in Developmental biology

http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/dept/gsas/ ... frame.html

3.) NYU program in Developmental Genetics

http://saturn.med.nyu.edu/research/dg/

4.) Princeton Developmental Biology

http://www.molbio.princeton.edu/index.p ... &Itemid=73

Does anyone know what kind of GRE sccore would have to get to be competitive for these programs? Does anyone have any suggestions about other programs in developmental biology in NYC, NJ area?

Thanks!

Shadowxx

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So are you saying that taking the GRE again is not neccessary? My orginial scores were quite poor.

I must say that I've never heard of an applicant being rejected due solely to his/her GRE score being too low. Did the programs you previously applied to actually tell you that your GRE score was the sole reason they didn't accept you? Or are you just assuming that you were rejected because of your GRE score?

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I must say that I've never heard of an applicant being rejected due solely to his/her GRE score being too low. Did the programs you previously applied to actually tell you that your GRE score was the sole reason they didn't accept you? Or are you just assuming that you were rejected because of your GRE score?

Thanks for the feedback!

Yes, I inquired about this, as did one of my teachers inquire with one of his associates. They told us that the weakest point on my application was low GRE scores, and that year a large number of students accepted their offers, so that also coupled with low funding lead to me being rejected.

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Thanks for the feedback!

Yes, I inquired about this, as did one of my teachers inquire with one of his associates. They told us that the weakest point on my application was low GRE scores, and that year a large number of students accepted their offers, so that also coupled with low funding lead to me being rejected.

Hmm. Was the problem with your subject GRE or with your general GRE, or both? If the problem was with your subject GRE, I'd say you're probably set now given that you will have completed a research Master's program. If the problem was with your general GRE, you might want to look into retaking it and getting a better score...

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Thanks for the feedback. I've just started studying for the general GRE again. I think if I get a good GRE score,coupled with my research experience, I should have a very solid application this time around.

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Thanks for the feedback. I've just started studying for the general GRE again. I think if I get a good GRE score,coupled with my research experience, I should have a very solid application this time around.

I agree. I recommend using all of the ETS materials - especially the PowerPrep software. For Verbal, really the only thing to do is to buckle down and study those word lists like mad. For Quant, figure out what areas you are having trouble with, and then dig out those old math books and drill. For Writing, there's no substitute to just sitting down and writing answers (under timed conditions) to the writing prompts provided on the ETS website.

If you have a hard time with independent studying, you may want to look into taking a test-prep classroom course. (If you can be self-organized and self-motivated though, there's really no need to take a classroom course.) Best of luck!

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