Jump to content

Research Assistant Position


dershark
 Share

Recommended Posts

I know that most paid research assistant positions are filled by knowing somebody who knows the professor but is there any way to search for these jobs? Are there any places research positions may be posted.

I am looking for clinical/developmental/school psychology research positions.

Thank you in advance for any help!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the schools I've talked to had a job board or a student listserv that they recommended in addition to networking. Usually the admissions contact for my schools was able to tell me what the most active job list was in their department, because a lot of people ask them about it.

 

I would also recommend looking in the departments of closely related fields, where a psychologist might be helpful to have on the study but not necessarily PI. Other departments at your institution probably have studies involving children or schools, so you could try contacting those PIs and offering yourself as a good person to be in contact with research subjects, in addition to whatever else a graduate research assistant would do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I know that most paid research assistant positions are filled by knowing somebody who the professor but is there any way to search for th knows ese jobs? Are there any places research positions may be posted.

I am looking for clinical/developmental/school psychology research positions.

Thank you in advance for any help!!

HTTP://www.indeed.com

its like the google search engine of job postings. It also includes university jobs higher ed jobs and aaaaaaall sorts of untapped job postings.

Most require a rigourous application process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK so you live in Lost Angeles, UCLA and USC

psych research is in many medical areas. Medical Psych research is generally in the Department of Internal Medicine.

Look at the psych dept of universities near by especially those I mentioned (I'm from LA so I'm very familiar with them area). Look through all there faculty pages just like the grad school pre-application process. Read through all there faculty pages and what their research interests are.

Send them an email and your CV (in development) as you gain research experience. Write what seems to be like a cover letter but as an email explaining your interest in their lab.

Many faculty will have a lab page and often a special page for "prospective students". now your aren't a PhD applicant but YOU ARE someone interested in JOINING THEIR LAB. So follow they process that any prospective student would, to become part of a research lab.

As an internship it won't be paid. You're gaining experience and hopefully a letter of Recommendation.

Need to gain research experience, that's how!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last, in developing your CV be sure to list relevant coursework such as stats calculus and other life science and physical science. Display your foundational courses in science so that you show you can think critically about findings in scientific endeavors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep. The old tried, true, and tested spam email a bunch of profs does indeed work.

 

That being said, you need to be smart about it. Only email profs that have similar research interests than you. Especially look for assistant profs or post-docs, these are the ones who are trying to churn out the most research. Make sure your email is well written, your CV is well-developed, and everything like that. 

 

You might have to start as a grunt worker for free. Doing lit reviews, cleaning up data, ect. But if you do a good job, you might get a paid position.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.