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Questions about MPP at UCLA


cathyxyz

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Hi, I'm an international applicant for MPP 2010 Fall. I'm accepted into UPenn(social Policy), Umich, Columbia( SIPA)CMU, Gtown, UCLA and USC.

Among those schools, I'm really leaning to MPP at UCLA. My interest lies in labor issues. I know MPP at UCLA has labor track, and this is unique advantage compared to other schools and really attracts me a lot.

I'm going to apply for PhD program after my graduation. So I'm quite curious about how many students in MPP at UCLA succeed in applying for PhD every year? Another question is does SPA provide many research opportunities with students?

Also, I notice that the UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education provide students a chance to complete a minor in labor studies. So can graduate student from MPP apply for this minor studies?

Many thanks!

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Hi, I'm an international applicant for MPP 2010 Fall. I'm accepted into UPenn(social Policy), Umich, Columbia( SIPA)CMU, Gtown, UCLA and USC.

Among those schools, I'm really leaning to MPP at UCLA. My interest lies in labor issues. I know MPP at UCLA has labor track, and this is unique advantage compared to other schools and really attracts me a lot.

I'm going to apply for PhD program after my graduation. So I'm quite curious about how many students in MPP at UCLA succeed in applying for PhD every year? Another question is does SPA provide many research opportunities with students?

Also, I notice that the UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education provide students a chance to complete a minor in labor studies. So can graduate student from MPP apply for this minor studies?

Many thanks!

Hi there. Congrats on your acceptances! A bit off-topic, but I saw that you are accepted at Penn. I had a friend who did their social work degree there and was very happy with the program. Personally, I'd highly recommend it, as Penn (aside from the brand) is super flexible about taking classes in other schools. So, if you're interested in labor issues (aside: why SIPA?), you can easily take classes at Penn GSE, Wharton, Law, and Fels, all of which have allied coursework in your area of interest. You can also do a dual-degree with the Fels MGA very easily, as I understand it, without costing you any more. If you ask me, that's a hell of a benefit.

Also, Philly is a wonderful town and you have very easy access both up and down the I-95 corridor.

Just thought I'd throw that in there.

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Hi there. Congrats on your acceptances! A bit off-topic, but I saw that you are accepted at Penn. I had a friend who did their social work degree there and was very happy with the program. Personally, I'd highly recommend it, as Penn (aside from the brand) is super flexible about taking classes in other schools. So, if you're interested in labor issues (aside: why SIPA?), you can easily take classes at Penn GSE, Wharton, Law, and Fels, all of which have allied coursework in your area of interest. You can also do a dual-degree with the Fels MGA very easily, as I understand it, without costing you any more. If you ask me, that's a hell of a benefit.

Also, Philly is a wonderful town and you have very easy access both up and down the I-95 corridor.

Just thought I'd throw that in there.

Thank you very much for sheding lights on Penn. I'd say what you mention about Penn is really attractive. As far as I know, the social work program at Penn is quite respected, but the social policy program is relatively new and small program. And it is an one-year program, I hope to accumulate more research experiences during my master studies, so I prefer a two-year program.

I'm interested in labor issues, and my focus is on Chinese labor issues. I don't see any professors at SIPA who share similar interests with me. But at UCLA, MPP program has a clear labor track and related faculty are excellent. I know some big names in this area like Ching Kwan Lee, Ruth M. Milkman, etc. It's very likely for me to work with them in the future. Also Campus resources also include labor related centers like UC Institute for Labor and Employment, UCLA Institue of Industrial Relations, UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education, etc. Finally, I find LA is a good place to study labor issues, because labor movement in California is really more intense than other areas. Those resources really make me believe that UCLA is the best choice compared to other schools.

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Hello Cathy,

You are right in thinking that Los Angeles is one of the best places to study labor issues. California is home to some of the largest, and most active, state and local labor unions in the country (I happen to belong to one: California School Employees Association). But it is also a hotbed of activist movements surrounding immigrant and other marginalized, non-represented laborers.

I think you will find a number of opportunities to perform research on real-life cases in Southern California. UCLA also has partnerships with a large number of public sector and non-profit organizations in the area. Of the two -- USC and UCLA -- UCLA is definitely the more "activist friendly" program.

I will be visiting UCLA tomorrow for their welcome day, though I admit that I will be keeping my eye out more for their international policy concentration (and opportunities in that realm), but just PM me for my general take on the program.

I got into many of the same schools you did -- Michigan, UCLA, SIPA -- and right now I am leaning towards U Michigan, but I am on a totally different career track so take that for what you will. :)

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Hello Cathy,

You are right in thinking that Los Angeles is one of the best places to study labor issues. California is home to some of the largest, and most active, state and local labor unions in the country (I happen to belong to one: California School Employees Association). But it is also a hotbed of activist movements surrounding immigrant and other marginalized, non-represented laborers.

I think you will find a number of opportunities to perform research on real-life cases in Southern California. UCLA also has partnerships with a large number of public sector and non-profit organizations in the area. Of the two -- USC and UCLA -- UCLA is definitely the more "activist friendly" program.

I will be visiting UCLA tomorrow for their welcome day, though I admit that I will be keeping my eye out more for their international policy concentration (and opportunities in that realm), but just PM me for my general take on the program.

I got into many of the same schools you did -- Michigan, UCLA, SIPA -- and right now I am leaning towards U Michigan, but I am on a totally different career track so take that for what you will. smile.gif

Hi! Thank you so much for your opinions. I've PM you~please check~

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Hi cathy. I got your PM and im going to give my opinion without explanation here anyway. Out of those schools that you got accepted to, I would think Michigan and UCLA are probably the strongest for your field of focus (Chinese Labor). For a more detailed explanation, go look at the msg i sent lol

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