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(Californian) Graduate Student voting rights?


LongGraduatedStudent
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I know as a Californian undergrad attending a Californian school (UC Berkeley) away from home (LA county), I am legally allowed to vote from home address by absentee ballot. As a graduate student in another state, would I still be able to continue voting from home? I've heard that the fact that one is being paid by the university makes it difficult.

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I don't know the answer to your question, but I do know that many public schools (depending on what state they are in) will request that you attempt to obtain residency in that state as soon as possible. In those cases you definitely would not be able to vote back at home.

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Depends on the state. In general, you can vote from home or from your new state (as long as you register in time). However, most public universities will require you to become a resident at some point for the purpose of tuition and fees. In that case, they may require you to register to vote in your new state as part of proving your residence.

yey! I love voting.

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Damn.

So private schools let you keep your permanent residence the same though?

I believe most do yes. Also, many states don't allow students to gain residency, so in those states the schools won't expect you to change your residency either.

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Proposition 8 repeal might be on the 2012 California November ballot, so I really want to be able to vote in California (to vote yes for repeal)

I'll bet you a nickle it's overturned before that!

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I'll bet you a nickle it's overturned before that!

That assumes that is entirely in the hands of the CA-SC, because the 9th punted the standing issue to them. If the CASC says there is not standing to appeal, "Yes on 8" will try to appeal the 9th CC's decision to punt. Basically, "Yes on 8" doesn't care to win, because they know their favor with people has dried up in California, they just want to keep the legal limbo going on forever. Also, no one knows when the CASC will even make their ruling

Removing Proposition 8 at the ballot, will probably be quicker than waiting for the courts.

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That assumes that is entirely in the hands of the CA-SC, because the 9th punted the standing issue to them. If the CASC says there is not standing to appeal, "Yes on 8" will try to appeal the 9th CC's decision to punt. Basically, "Yes on 8" doesn't care to win, because they know their favor with people has dried up in California, they just want to keep the legal limbo going on forever. Also, no one knows when the CASC will even make their ruling

Removing Proposition 8 at the ballot, will probably be quicker than waiting for the courts.

I certainly hope you're right, particularly about the "protectmarriage.com" people realizing that the people are sick of them. I find these people don't really have a sense of reality...

At least if it does show up on the ballot, and i get into UCLA, i'll be voting to strike it down!

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It really depends on what each residency gets you, deciding what you are going to do. This is NOT a decision to be taken lightly. Where you vote is one thing that is used as evidence of where you "domocile". If you have a good reason to keep your current residency, you can even if you collect a paycheck in another state, but you have to keep all your ducks in a row- vote there, always write it down as your permanent address, accrue evidence that you plan to return, etc.

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I just got admitted to one public school, with a very nice fellowship. That school is in a swing state, so voting there is slightly tempting if I go there.

My long term goal in life is to one day be able to permanent move back to Los Angeles County (the best county/county-level unit in the country :)). I am currently registered in Los Angeles county.

I will problem figure it out afterwards. One reason I am kind of concerned about this is because I have always contemplated running for political office in California, if I stay registered at my permanent address I'd be less likely to look like a carpetbagger if I actually do so.

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I'd imagine that the graduate admissions office at each school will have some guidence on what the residency requirements are and can give you the name of someone to contact with more info for your particular school.

Also, I'd imagine it all changes if you're married/have kids as you'd have to be registered where you all live/are enrolled in school.

When in doubt, I'd say register to vote in the state that you file your taxes.

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