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Meaning of an Offer


m.giugno

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Hi guys!

I received an offer, I'm a non-resident applicant and in the letter it is stated:

"This offer is considered a 12 month, half time appointment, and makes you eligible for medical insurance; plus, resident tuition will be paid for you. The assistantship saves you from paying the nonresident tuition ($6600 or more per year). Instead you are charged resident tuition and your advisor pays this for you (up to 9 hrs each fall/spring semester or 6 hrs Summer."

What does this phrase mean?

Do I need to pay some kind/partial tuition or not? It's unclear!

Please help :huh:

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Hi guys!

I received an offer, I'm a non-resident applicant and in the letter it is stated:

"This offer is considered a 12 month, half time appointment, and makes you eligible for medical insurance; plus, resident tuition will be paid for you. The assistantship saves you from paying the nonresident tuition ($6600 or more per year). Instead you are charged resident tuition and your advisor pays this for you (up to 9 hrs each fall/spring semester or 6 hrs Summer."

What does this phrase mean?

Do I need to pay some kind/partial tuition or not? It's unclear!

Please help :huh:

Congratulations on your offer!

Like theatrehippie said, it looks like the department is covering the difference between the in-state tuition rate (covered by the university/grad school) and the out-of-state rate. Most states let you apply for residency after having lived there for a year (maybe sometimes less?), so just be sure to look into making yourself officially a resident when you get there, in case they don't continue covering the difference year to year. This is something that I was asked to do by my department.

Also, not sure if it was part of your original question, but "half time appointment" means that you'll be working 20 hours a week—standard for a grad assistantship.

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They are only charging resident tuition on your behalf, and your advisor pays for the resident tuition. You don't need to pay any tuition.

I hope so! Is that a normal way of offer assistantship? It sound strange to me that they split my coverage.. :mellow:

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I hope so! Is that a normal way of offer assistantship? It sound strange to me that they split my coverage.. :mellow:

first of all congratulations! on your admission as well as your assistantship. it is pretty standard. they reduced your tuition to resident-status level tuition and then your prof pays it for you, provided you still work for 20 hrs a week (1/2 time, full time would be 40 hrs/week) and you're also kind of limited to the amount of courses you can take each semester, no more than 9 hrs during fall/spring and no more than 6 during summer.

good luck, hope you enjoy graduate school!

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Sounds like a great offer actually, congratulations! As others have said you'll be assessed tuition at the residential rate - which you won't be paying since your advisor's funds will pay it. The half-time appointments usually means that the assistantship is equivalent to a 20 hour/week job (although the amount of time you work per week will probably vary). A full-time appointment would have been equivalent to a full time 40 hour/week job. Good luck!

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