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Education job market


edapplicant
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I am considering accepting an offer for a PhD program in Education. Does anyone know where I can find information on the academic (and other) job market for Education? Does anyone know how the job possibilities compare to other social science/humanities? I'm looking at doing education policy studies and within that drawn to history or sociology of education. When it comes to jobs, would doing this kind of work in an education program be an advantage or disadvantage to doing it in history or sociology? How likely is it that one could teach outside of an education program? Any direction here would be great. Thanks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I teach HS and I'm finishing up my M.Ed (and I'm considering a PhD in Ed Psych). I know a few folks who are getting EdD's and PhD's in Ed.

If you get a Doctorate in Ed, you're teaching in an Ed dep't or working for a school district. Ed PhD/EdD's are virtually unhirable in other dept's. For reasons outside the scope of a single post, Ed dept's are pretty much at the bottom of the academic totem pole. That's not to say there aren't plenty of jobs, though (especially outside academia in the school system or the federal gov't).

Job possibilities aren't bad (probably better than just about anything in the social sciences excepting econ, hard psych and hard soc degrees)- even for not so great schools, especially if you're considering Curriculum or something. You probably won't be teaching at the college level though. At what level have you taught already? What's your content area?

What area of specialization is the PhD/EdD? These degrees really run the gamut. Some are basically "phone it in" degrees and others are research degrees. Oddly, the "phone it in ones" (which are mostly administration oriented EdD's) have the best financial return on their investment, but are generally unhirable in academia. Make sure you're getting the one that suits your financial or career interests.

If you're interested in Sociology - consider getting a degree in that too, if you haven't. If you are interested in "hard" sociology and are good at number-crunching (and know your way around SPSS), there are always jobs with the gov't.

Hope that helps!

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The academic market is tough, but there are certainly jobs available for those outside of the top 5 set (you just probably have to look at schools w/lesser reps than the one you attended) - it will hinge most on your advisor/other faculty you work with and how much you can publish.

I do agree that you will likely be constrained to ed programs afterward; however, there is a recent move toward a more quantitative focus w/ed doctorates, and if you are a really strong quant person, perhaps you could transition to another area...

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You should go to an academically oriented program or you're probably not working in academia, even in Education, unless you already have your own connections (maybe your program is a top one, I don't know). There are a lot of Ed doctoral programs that are not academic degrees, but professional ones (which is fine, if you're looking for that - they tend to have relatively good returns per dollar). Look at the faculty at some of the lesser schools in your area. Is it possible you'll get a job in academia from a lesser program? Yes. Is it probable? Not really, except maybe at the school you attend.

Also, have you looked at the placement rates of the program you applied to? That's the surest way to gauge this. Forget what me, the other guy, or anyone else said. Check for yourself. That's the best solution.

Like I said though, these are not bad degrees to have (unlike most academics, they have an actual skill set) so long as you're willing to work if you can't get something in the ivory tower. Also, for the love of God, learn to use SPSS if you haven't. I don't like it (I type out formulas myself in Excel), but it's the standard in the field. Plug and chug. Good skill to have and list on your resume. I wish I had picked it up sooner.

Ever read the OOH? Here's the sociologist entry.

http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes193041.htm

Ed prof salaries tend to be relatively miniscule compared to other dep't's too (@45-55). Trying to find the chronicle article about it. If I find it I'll post it.

In the mean time, here's the regular salary survey. Subscribe to the Chronicle (or at least the free article they e-mail you), if you don't already. Read it religiously. You will find a lot of useful info there.

http://chronicle.com/stats/aaup/

I still think you're better off financially getting a soc of ed degree, esp if your ug was soc, and I think you'd be insane to teach college with a doctorate in Education when you can make twice as much money doing consulting or working for the gov't, but you have to do what makes you happy (there are things besides finances to consider after all). It's 5-7 years of your life, not mine. I also have something of a distaste for the academy, so take it fwiw.

On an aside, have you taken high level history classes? They're way different at the grad level. Primary sources galore. Personally, I like them, but a lot of people think it's incredibly boring compared to the surveys. Also, at least with a Soc or Ed degree you have legitimate backup options and skillsets if the academy doesn't work out. History - not so much.

Hope that helps!

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Not really, except maybe at the school you attend.

Most of the schools I've been to and profs I've talked to don't like to hire their own (especially right after grad school) - and yes, look at the placement rates, but also look at the CVs and bios of professors at schools in the top 25 (or anywhere else you'd like to work)...there are plenty that aren't from the top 5.

I plan to be an Ed. Psych. professor, and yes, money isn't everything, but it isn't as dire a picture sono paints - there are perks you can negotiate for and there are schools that pay all their profs on the same level (at least to start).

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Most of the schools I've been to and profs I've talked to don't like to hire their own (especially right after grad school) - and yes, look at the placement rates, but also look at the CVs and bios of professors at schools in the top 25 (or anywhere else you'd like to work)...there are plenty that aren't from the top 5.

t_ruth,

This may be the case.

Perhaps my frame of reference is limited to my institution which likes to do this for whatever reason (most of the profs at my U are Teacher's College or from my school's grad program). Granted, my school has a placement problem. A very bad one, so that could be part of it. From what I've seen, this occurs at most similarly ranked (and not particularly prestigious) schools.

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