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"You could apply to schools overseas! ASHA's Mutual Recognition Agreement recognizes the certification programs of speech-language pathology in five countries: Canada, the U.K., Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand."

Will I be able to attend a university overseas and still be a licensed SLP in the states?

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"You could apply to schools overseas! ASHA's Mutual Recognition Agreement recognizes the certification programs of speech-language pathology in five countries: Canada, the U.K., Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand."

Will I be able to attend a university overseas and still be a licensed SLP in the states?

Yeap, it is true.  That is what the Mutual Recognition Agreement is all about.

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This is something I am actively considering for next year, because to go to school at some schools in the UK is still cheaper than fees for out of state schools, and I have lots of friends there. :P Sad, isn't it? The price of education in America. >.<

 

I think my mother might kill me though if I go spend another 3 years (or probably more!) abroad, though. lol But there is obviously paperwork for getting the license offically recognized,  but I haven't read up on it. Has anyone around here, or does anyone know anyone who went abroad for their Masters and came back to the US to work?

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"You could apply to schools overseas! ASHA's Mutual Recognition Agreement recognizes the certification programs of speech-language pathology in five countries: Canada, the U.K., Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand."

Will I be able to attend a university overseas and still be a licensed SLP in the states?

Yes! I looked into this option, but decided it would be too expensive of an option for me, personally. It sounds like a wonderful time though!

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It is certainly possible, but I don't think it's quite that straight forward. I read that the mutual recognition agreement does not mean reciprocity of certification. All of the participating countries do have at least similar requirements, but they are necessarily equivalent, so there may be some additional requirements needed before you could practice abroad. 

 

This still sounds like an amazing opportunity and the extra steps are probably worth it so don't let the "fine print" dissuade you if you're really interested!

 

http://www.asha.org/Certification/Mutual-Recognition-Agreement-FAQs--General-Information/ 

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This does not mean that the degree program is recognized. The mutual recognition program recognizes the certification bodies of those countries. A university is not a certification body, ASHA is, for example. My understanding is that this mutual agreement is for working professionals who are looking to relocate. A degree abroad does not guarantee certification by ASHA.

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