MSW Assistantships? - Social Workers Forum - The GradCafe Forums
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MSW Assistantships?


BunnyMeadows

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I have been accepted at three public universities, and one private university.

 

I've received a scholarship from the private school, and just received a graduate assistantship from one of my top out of state choices that offers in-state tuition, discounted health care, and a $2500/yr stipend. This is in exchange for 8 hours of work per week with a faculty member. 

 

I haven't heard from financial aid yet.

 

Just wondering if anyone else has pursued this, or received anything?

 

 

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Hrmm... It's not a BAD offer for the amount of service required. In-state tuition is not bad.

 

My MSW GA came with tuition waiver, 60% health insurance, and $10,000 a year in stipend. But the appointment is for a lot more service --  20 hours per week. I have TA'd one course per semester, done some administrative work, and provided support for community outreach.

Edited by pippapants
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That is what I hoped for - and another school is considering me for that. However, the school that is offering the in-state tuition for 8 hours a week is my top choice, and where I want to settle after graduation. 

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Is this for advanced standing or for a two-year program? If it's for a two-year program, there may be a possibility that you could have your second year paid by a half-time appointment for if you build relationships and perform well your first year... Just a thought.

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Wow. Thank you for that insight. 

 

It's a FT two-year program. I have no social work experience, but lots of other experience in business, communication, PR, grant writing, nonprofit development/leadership. 

 

This program has been the most welcoming by far, the Dean is amazing, and I want to be there for other reasons. 

 

I have a possibility of a full-ride at another school, but we will see....

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Dude, I paid my first year at a state school with loans and was DONE with that when I did my financial aid entrance counseling (I didn't want any more than $20,000 for my MSW), so I started looking for professors who would take me on the next year. I built a relationship with my current boss early on in my first year when I applied for a research fellowship she oversees, and then I started bugging her about hiring me before she ever even started looking for a new GA. You really have to put yourself out there and let professors know you want to work.

 

I don't think my boss even interviewed anyone else. Ha. But she's told me multiple times this year how much she enjoys my work, and she wrote me an amazing LOR for PhD programs.

Edited by pippapants
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So, at my program, some professors have a graduate assistant, and some don't.  Of the professors who have a graduate assistant, some are research-based, some are teaching-based, and some are administrative.  Of those positions, some hired incoming first year grads and keep them for two years (such that the position wouldn't be open the next year), and some had second year grad students.  So I scoped out which professors had graduate students who were leaving and which professors I would be willing to work with.

 

Sure, we have a "generic GA application process," but if you're a second year student, you can often skirt that system by letting a professor know that you are looking for an assistantship and would be interested in working with them.  By the time I got done, I had several offers for GAs, whereas other people had none.  :)  It pays to be aggressive.

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