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Am I missing something?


Changing paths?
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This is a repost since I was just told that this section even exists. So please read and suggest.

So I recently decided to start looking into Graduate Geography programs concentrating in political/regional geography specifically in regards to Russia and the territories on its border. Now I got the AAG School guides handbook but they ran out of the 2009-2010 so I have the 2007-2008 one that I purchased at a reduced price. And it's lovely for looking up schools but I've noticed at least one exception and was wondering if I was missing any others? The Schools that just seem to have this program or some way for me to craft it are:

CSU Long Beach

UT Austin

UW Madison

U of Ohio

U of Montana

Now are there any others i should be aware of?

Also does anyone have any suggestions for a non geography major trying to get into a Masters geography program?

Thanks much!

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You might consider Indiana University. Although it is not directly through the geography program, you can get a P.hD. minor from the Russian and East European Institute and it looks like there are several geography faculty members with strong ties to the center.

I am also in the same boat as you and have had only one undergraduate course in geography. From what I have read on many department websites and heard from other people, it is not necessary to have a geography major and a lot of the students listed on the website do not have geography backgrounds. In fact, if you look at a lot of professor bios, many of them do not have geography degrees. This speaks to the fact that it is a very broad discipline that requires people and skills from many areas. What I have noticed is that it seems to help tremendously if you have a background in the social sciences (anthropology, sociology, etc. seem to be the most common), as there is a lot of overlap and the skills you already have will translate well. From what I have heard from professors and admissions officers I have talked to is that they are interested in bringing in a variety of people who are truly interested in geography and are willing to work hard and learn, so a good and focused statement and relevant research possibilities can go a long way (my professors have all told me to be very precise about what I want to study and why I want to be a geographer and not a sociologist, historian, etc.). They are also interested in bringing in people that will help the department grow, not just a bunch of GIS majors and people that can quote David Harvey all day long.

They also tend to give more weight to the quantitative section of the GRE, even if you do not plan to focus on mathematical applications. They also are looking to see that you have some knowledge of statistics, although most will allow you to take this when you arrive, but it certainly helps out to be set with it when you are coming in.

This is most of what I know about it, if you have any suggestions, please share them because I to want to make sure I am doing everything right.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Kansas and Michigan State come to mind. Any place with a Title VI center in that area might be a good idea. You can always just search through the websites of individual departments (there aren't so many dept websites that this would be really arduous). There's been a good bit of faculty movement since the 07-08 guide was published, so definitely consult dept websites as well.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 months later...

Also does anyone have any suggestions for a non geography major trying to get into a Masters geography program?

Thanks much!

In general, most people come into Geography "late". As a Tomm421 points out, most Geog profs have B* and M* is field other than Geog. In my Masters program, those of us with a B* in Geog and in the vast minority. Just keep in mind that, at their core, geographers are jacks of many trades, just putting a spatial spin on pretty much any "area". Having a degree in another field won't hurt, especially if you spin how it's completely relevant to your goals (if I can make genetics, web design, computer art, programming, and geography completely relevant AT THE SAME TIME, it's possible with anything ;) )

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