rising_star

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rising_star last won the day on August 8

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About rising_star

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  1. Here's my question: Can you really write a good lit review that will redeem you in her eyes in a weekend? My answer about most topics that aren't in my immediate focus area would be no. Maybe the work you've done with the tables gives you enough to do this but, I would be very careful with your proposed plan because you don't want to end up submitting a literature review which also leads her to question your writing ability, skill set, and/or knowledge. Yes, you disappointed your chair. It happens. We've all done it. (I won't even go into the long list of ways in which I've done that.) But you have to focus on moving forward. One thing you might do is have a meeting where you all lay out a clear set of tasks to be accomplished and deadlines by which they'll be done. Because, really, at this point, if you're trying to graduate ASAP, I would be focusing on your dissertation and what you need to do for that rather than on a literature review you're no longer being paid to work on.
  2. Conference Paper Commenting

    Make sure you get the paper in advance and read it thoroughly. Also, you'll want to be clear about how much time you have. In my experience the best discussants have a nice balance of praising what the author did well, offering critique based on other viewpoints/literature, and asking questions. P.S. Make sure you actually listen to the paper being delivered as sometimes there are differences between what people send in and what they present.
  3. is there an app?

    Usually when someone invents something because it's more convenient, they also make money off of it. But we don't really make any money for running this site so there's little incentive to develop an app for it. If someone built us one, we'd certainly take a look at it.
  4. is there an app?

    @jasper8625, was that an offer to develop an app?
  5. MA vs PhD Anthropology

    The main downsides are the additional time it will take. But, it sounds like you already have compelling reasons to do a MA first. If you can find funding, the research experience you gain during a MA program can definitely make you a more desirable applicant for PhD programs.
  6. Overwhelmed in the search for the right department

    I would look at MA programs in human geography, anthropology, and sociology. Doing a MA is a great way to help you narrow down your interests. It will also help you overcome the GPA if/when you go for a PhD somewhere.
  7. Trouble getting onto this site?

    Periodically we have to do forum software upgrades for security reasons. These aren't announced in advance, largely because our software provider doesn't give us any advance notice on these.
  8. Which method should I choose?

    There are a variety of different types of content analysis so it could be that you and your supervisor have different things in mind when you say that that's the analytical method you want to use. I urge you to read more about content analysis and present a coherent case to your advisor about what you want to do and why in a meeting with them. The SAGE Handbooks on research methods are a great place to start. That said, from what you've written, it may be that neither content analysis nor process analysis is the appropriate method. I'd suggest looking at some texts on qualitative research methods (Bernard's Research Methods in Anthropology is a great resource) and going from there.
  9. AdCom requires thesis, but I think it sucks

    I would send them what they asked for. You might ask if you can send an additional, more recent writing sample though.
  10. Font Size on WS Opinions

    Well, do you really think your writing sample is so great that you should get more space (and thus more of the adcom's time) than the other applicants?
  11. Narrowing Down Your List

    @samman1994, you probably don't need to pick the specific professor right now while you're in the application process. You should be able to wait until after being accepted and visiting to decide which lab you want to join.
  12. I moved over 1000 miles away for undergrad so moving away from home for grad school wasn't a big deal to me. I applied to schools near home and family but also lots of schools that weren't nearby when I was looking at MA programs. I ended up at one where I had family about 90 minutes away but, the family wasn't a factor. It was the program I wanted, had good funding, and gave me the chance to have an excellent advisor. For PhD programs, I looked everywhere in the USA and ended up over 2K miles from where I grew up. Part of being an academic (especially on the TT) is being willing to move almost anywhere for a job... I'm probably less flexible now that I'm done with grad school for a variety of personal reasons. Even still, I'd pick up and move wherever for the right opportunity (what's right of course will vary from one person to the next). The only way in which distance from home/family factored in was that I looked up the price of flights home for the holidays and calculated that into the budget when trying to ensure I could live on the stipend being offered. Oh, and the travel time to make that trip. Otherwise, it wasn't a major consideration.
  13. Of course each thesis is unique (otherwise it wouldn't be making a new contribution to the scholarship). But, there are commonalities in arguments which it would behoove you to identify long-term (Note: not entirely necessary for the writing sample of a PhD application). If you really want to get better at your argumentation, then it might be helpful to map out how each article/chapter you read works. That is, what's their thesis, what evidence do they support it with, and how do they use that evidence in making their argument? It's not just about language but also seeing what texts/sections people are drawing on when writing about your topic. So true about only a Professor being guaranteed to have tenure. There are Associate Profs at my institution that don't have tenure yet (often because the tenure and promotion processes are separated, especially when one comes in with credit of years spent at a previous institution). There are also Teaching Professor tracks at many schools now. In fact, I think the semantic move to "Teaching Professor" is precisely because some people devalue people who are "merely Lecturers" (and there's been evidence of that in this thread!). The University System of Georgia has a teaching-track where one can be promoted and receive tenure, just as there is a research track and the combo research/teaching/service which has historically been most prevalent. There are also tracks where Lecturers can be promoted to Senior Lecturer after six years (so the same timing as going up for tenure if one were on the tenure-track), suggesting another avenue of permanent employment that belies how people typically think of the term.
  14. Seeking: PhD programs for trans studies

    I saw a job ad today for someone specializing in Trans Studies so there must be programs/people out there... Good luck, OP!
  15. I wouldn't bother trying to get a second master's. Apply to PhD programs and see what happens. Be confident. You may want to consider interdisciplinary options in public policy and other social science fields, in addition to straight environmental science programs.