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Clinical Psych PhD- What are my chances?


Clinicalpsych111

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I wanted to know what other people think of my chances of getting in?

I have 3.21 undergrad gpa, 3 publications, 3 years clinical research, GRE- 156 V, 153 Q, 5 on writing section, poster presentations- one of which at an international conference. 

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On 11/30/2017 at 12:31 AM, Clinicalpsych111 said:

I wanted to know what other people think of my chances of getting in?

I have 3.21 undergrad gpa, 3 publications, 3 years clinical research, GRE- 156 V, 153 Q, 5 on writing section, poster presentations- one of which at an international conference. 

I know that applicants often want a clear cut answer as to the likelihood that they will be accepted. However, the truth is that there are so many factors that you cannot account for, including your competition. The answer to your question also depends on what programs you're applying to and how your stats compare to their admissions data. Besides these factors, there are myriad individual preferences when it comes to PIs making their selections, and there's just no way to know if the planets will align in your favor. If you do get an interview, just be yourself and learn as much as possible about the PI's research and think about what you can bring to the table, etc.

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Your question is vague. Getting in where?

Your chances may be different for Harvard University than for Capella University. Your chances depend on a lot of factors, and the information you posted here is insufficient for anyone to give you an answer. But here are a few cues:

1. Getting into APA-accredited programs is generally more challenging than getting into non accredited ones.

2. The schools where you are applying to might offer statistics on their minimum or optimal GRE and GPA requirements and expectations.

3. GPAs under 3.5 are not considered to be the most competitive ones while Clinical PhD programs are usually very competitive. Depending on your target universities, however, 3.21 may be acceptable. Again: check your universities' websites for more information on average GPAs. There are programs that gladly accept students in your GPA range, but since I don't know where you are applying to, it is difficult to evaluate your GPAs.

4. Your GREs 156V and 153Q put you into the ~70th and ~50th percentiles, respectively. While scoring under the 50% is not a great chance, scoring above 50% may be enough to save you from being cut off directly. Again, everything depends on the particular schools where you applied to. Your scores are fairly average, however. While your 156V is a bit lower than most optimal GREs for average clinical programs, your Q score is around the most typical range. Again, some schools don't even consider GRE scores, so without knowing your target institutions, it is hard to say anything.

5. Your research background sounds very competitive, but I don't know what you mean by publications. Again, if you are applying to heavily research-oriented programs, your research experience may put you into a very favorable position. Again: it all depends on your particular target institutions.

6. You must have submitted a personal statement. Its quality and content is likely to be crucial for the evaluation of your application. Depending on what you mentioned or failed to mention in it, your chances may be enhances or reduced. A strong statement is likely to call the attention of the admissions committee by conveying something unique and special about you.

7. Your letters of recommendation are likely to bear a heavy weight - depending on institution, of course. Some institutions, e.g. Pennsylvania State, are looking for recommendations stating that you have been your recommender's most truly exceptional student for the last few years. A strong recommendation letter may enhance your chances, a poor or mediocre one may worsen the situation.

What I have written here may not be of much help, but without knowing specifics about your case, it is hard to say anything.

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